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sarah_ch
05-05-2010, 02:14 PM
Not sure... does CAS penalize for carry-through errors?
e.g., you need the answer from (a) to compute (b), but (a) is wrong so (b) is wrong.

Vorian Atreides
05-05-2010, 02:28 PM
No . . . I'm pretty sure that I saw this explicitly in the Syllabus Notes . . . I'll see if I can find an explicit reference.

tommie frazier
05-05-2010, 02:37 PM
in general, if your error in a doesn't make part b trivial, you are graded on the proper technique given the accepted assumption.

one could even skip a (pretend it asked you to find a loss ratio), and start b with "I assumed a loss ratio of 65%" and then go through it.

sarah_ch
05-05-2010, 02:44 PM
Thank you.
The things you worry about the day before the exam...

Vorian Atreides
05-05-2010, 02:53 PM
It might be helpful to look at the following rubric used for grading Exam 6. The first scenario is very telling about how the graders are looking at a problem in terms of grading it.

http://www.casact.org/admissions/exampapers/grading_rubrics_2008_Exam6.pdf

atkinsmt
05-05-2010, 03:01 PM
if your error in a doesn't make part b trivial

What does this part mean?

Vorian Atreides
05-05-2010, 03:08 PM
Basically, if the error in part (a) results in an answer that makes doing work for part (b) unnecessary, then you'll lose points for part (b) as well.

If you still need to do calculations for part (b), then you're graded on the process you present under the assumption that the answer to part (a) is correct.

nonactuarialactuary
05-05-2010, 03:35 PM
What does this part mean?

For example, suppose part A asks you to get revised relativities for classes 1, 2, and 3, and part B asks you to calculate the revised base premium if a regulator decides to cap all class level rate increases at 20%, given that the base rate was $100. Even if you can't get the relativities right in part A, you can bet that the total change for one of the classes will be over 20%, otherwise they wouldn't be asking part B. If you assume an answer to part A that makes the revised base rate also equal $100 (because nothing is over the 20% cap), you're not going to get credit for part B. The same goes for ridiculous assumptions. For example, setting all loss relativities other than base to 0.

fomoz
05-05-2010, 04:24 PM
sarah, do u know if there's parking around the TD insurance building? i looked in street view and it looks like there's only paid parking lots :/

sarah_ch
05-05-2010, 07:04 PM
sarah, do u know if there's parking around the TD insurance building? i looked in street view and it looks like there's only paid parking lots :/

I have no idea. Someone is driving me. All I know is I'm leaving at 5:45 because I don't want to get stuck in traffic on the bridge.

I would guess there is free parking though. It's not like it's downtown.

chicken_po_boy
05-05-2010, 10:36 PM
If I'm asked to calculate relativities for 3 territories, and I blow the question... can I still get 1/3 credit if I say the base territory is 1.00?

tommie frazier
05-05-2010, 11:01 PM
If I'm asked to calculate relativities for 3 territories, and I blow the question... can I still get 1/3 credit if I say the base territory is 1.00?

if the rubric is set to award 1/3 of a point to each relativity. I doubt that's the case.