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View Full Version : How do you abbreviate $1,000,000


silverfox
02-25-2011, 12:14 PM
People are so inconsistent. Make up your minds peoples!

silverfox
02-25-2011, 12:17 PM
I guess it's just as important to know whether you abbreviate $1,000 as 1m or 1K

Peterson28
02-25-2011, 12:18 PM
$1M

MountainHawk
02-25-2011, 12:30 PM
$1M

$1MM is lame.

limabeanactuary
02-25-2011, 12:57 PM
$1M

$1MM is lame.

You're definitely on my list now.

Bison
02-25-2011, 01:01 PM
Either $1m or $1M. Voted $1M since I use that more.

And potentially stupid question, but what's the rationale behind the extra M in $1MM?

ShakeNBakes
02-25-2011, 01:12 PM
$1,000,000 = $1M
$1,000 = $1K

JMO
02-25-2011, 01:17 PM
Don't use K:
1K = 1028

I think either 1m or 1M is OK. For powerpoint, I'm likely to go with M. Or put it in the heading that all data is in $M or even "$000,000".

The Economist magazine consistently uses $1m (or any other currency unit, for that matter), but they still spell out billion in full.

silverfox
02-25-2011, 01:17 PM
Either $1m or $1M. Voted $1M since I use that more.

And potentially stupid question, but what's the rationale behind the extra M in $1MM?

Some people use 1m as 1000. I think roman numeral m = 1000. So mm = 1000x1000. I think... It doesn't make sense to me, but mm eliminates all confusion.

Bison
02-25-2011, 01:29 PM
Don't use K:
1K = 1028

I think either 1m or 1M is OK. For powerpoint, I'm likely to go with M. Or put it in the heading that all data is in $M or even "$000,000".

The Economist magazine consistently uses $1m (or any other currency unit, for that matter), but they still spell out billion in full.

Really? You wouldn't use $250K for $250,000? And I'd say that many more people think 1K = 1000 (kilometers, kilograms, etc.) before the computer science version of K.


Some people use 1m as 1000. I think roman numeral m = 1000. So mm = 1000x1000. I think... It doesn't make sense to me, but mm eliminates all confusion.
Ah, I see where you're coming from. I can't say I've ever seen 1m=1000 before. I have seen the $1MM a fair amount, though. I just always kinda assumed it was to make sure it "stood out."

limabeanactuary
02-25-2011, 01:38 PM
If I'm using K or M/MM, I'm only talking order of magnitude anyway.

There's no big deal if 1K = 1000 or 1024. At the precision level, they're equal.

atfl
02-25-2011, 01:43 PM
1K = 1000
1 Ki = 1024 (and I suppose the i is dropped when it is understood we are talking about binary)

silverfox
02-25-2011, 01:58 PM
1K = 1000
1 Ki = 1024 (and I suppose the i is dropped when it is understood we are talking about binary)

I thought she was saying that K could be mistaken for full credibility standard (which I think is bullshit) of 1024.

cincinnatikid
02-25-2011, 02:32 PM
1,000 = 1k
1,000,000 = 1kk?

JMO
02-25-2011, 02:54 PM
Really? You wouldn't use $250K for $250,000? And I'd say that many more people think 1K = 1000 (kilometers, kilograms, etc.) before the computer science version of K.
I sometimes say 250 thou. Or, in power point, I'd go with a column heading of $000.

ElDucky
02-25-2011, 03:35 PM
1,000 = 1k
1,000,000 = 1kk?

Good thing numbers don't go up to 1,000,000,000

Pseudolus
02-25-2011, 03:42 PM
If I'm using K or M/MM, I'm only talking order of magnitude anyway.

There's no big deal if 1K = 1000 or 1024. At the precision level, they're equal.

Reminds me of my favorite rounding example: In my astrophysics class we were talking about modeling very, very, approximately the nuclear processes going on inside stars. How approximately? Well, without any further loss of precision we rounded pi to "1".

Lucy
02-25-2011, 03:44 PM
I sometimes say 250 thou.seriously? That looks weird and casual to me. I almost always see it as 250K.


Or, in power point, I'd go with a column heading of $000.In any formated document, this is a common practice.

JMO
02-25-2011, 03:45 PM
seriously? That looks weird and casual to me. I almost always see it as 250K.


In any formated document, this is a common practice.
Around here, I almost always see it as 0.25M.

limabeanactuary
02-25-2011, 03:46 PM
Reminds me of my favorite rounding example: In my astrophysics class we were talking about modeling very, very, approximately the nuclear processes going on inside stars. How approximately? Well, without any further loss of precision we rounded pi to "1".

\pi^2 = 10

Pseudolus
02-25-2011, 04:00 PM
\pi^2 = 10

Extra multiple of ten? Feh. Not worth worrying about. Just cross off all the \pis and be done with it.

Pseudolus
02-25-2011, 04:02 PM
However, rounding the number of seconds in a year to \pi * 10^7, now that's useful.

silverfox
02-25-2011, 05:15 PM
I think my survey has enough credibility now. K=25 for professional surveys.

/thread

PSU2002
02-25-2011, 05:17 PM
I actually will use 1M but put a line over the M. I had more than one instructor that would do this in college and picked it up from there.

A Student
02-25-2011, 05:31 PM
Finally, an important survey. I used to use 1K, 1M, and 1B, but I kept getting "corrected" to use 1mm. Eventually, I gave in and changed to 1mm, but now I learn that other cool people use 1M. I'm switching back, screw it.

MountainHawk
02-25-2011, 05:32 PM
Finally, an important survey. I used to use 1K, 1M, and 1B, but I kept getting "corrected" to use 1mm. Eventually, I gave in and changed to 1mm, but now I learn that other cool people use 1M. I'm switching back, screw it.
K, M, B. Totally correct.

Pseudolus
02-25-2011, 05:36 PM
Idunno about common practice in the bidniss world, but "mm" looks a) dumb, and 2) like you mean "millimeter".

Katie.
02-25-2011, 06:39 PM
I picked up mm when I worked with a lot of investment bankers. Seems to be the convention there.

Lucy
02-25-2011, 06:44 PM
My first casualty employer used MM. My current one uses M, or "($000,000's)"

nonlnear
02-27-2011, 12:27 AM
I picked up mm when I worked with a lot of investment bankers. Seems to be the convention there.
Investment bankers aren't exactly known for using best practices...

Saint Kepler
02-27-2011, 03:33 PM
K, M, B. Totally correct.

That's what I use.

JMO
02-28-2011, 08:58 AM
Finally, an important survey. I used to use 1K, 1M, and 1B, but I kept getting "corrected" to use 1mm. Eventually, I gave in and changed to 1mm, but now I learn that other cool people use 1M. I'm switching back, screw it.
Wise people use the form their boss prefers. Just sayin'

MountainHawk
02-28-2011, 09:21 AM
Wise people use the form their boss prefers. Just sayin'
What a JSA thing to say. ;-)

Tabulator
02-28-2011, 02:51 PM
Wise people use the form their boss prefers. Just sayin'

Exactly. I used to use "M" for thousand and "MM" for million, based on the Latin. But I changed to "K" and "M", respectively, based on the conventions preferred by my boss. (But I still secretly think my way is right.:danim:)

MightySchoop
02-28-2011, 04:05 PM
I use k, M, and B, myself.

cincinnatikid
02-28-2011, 05:01 PM
Exactly. I used to use "M" for thousand and "MM" for million, based on the Latin. But I changed to "K" and "M", respectively, based on the conventions preferred by my boss. (But I still secretly think my way is right.:danim:)

I'm assuming that by Latin, you mean Roman numerals? In which case, doesn't MM = $2,000?

Updated: I googled the actual Latin and now see the "Mille" argument.

CantGoogleMe
02-28-2011, 05:15 PM
mm = millimeter
MM = million

Not Mike
03-01-2011, 12:15 PM
Exactly. I used to use "M" for thousand and "MM" for million, based on the Latin. But I changed to "K" and "M", respectively, based on the conventions preferred by my boss. (But I still secretly think my way is right.:danim:)

I'm like you, I use MM for million in conversational email, but in business I use M if I abbreviate, but usually try to spell out million. I realize my audience doesn't understand that MM is "right", so no sense in that.

Len Myers
03-01-2011, 11:10 PM
Around here, I almost always see it as 0.25M.

The actuaries at a former employer all tended to round amounts to
(1/2)^n * (10)^m, with 0<=n<=2.

I started using m=1000, but the roman usage is dead, and euro-style is the norm. If inflation hits us again, expect T to come into wide use. :)

Lucy
03-02-2011, 12:53 AM
I'm like you, I use MM for million in conversational email, but in business I use M if I abbreviate, but usually try to spell out million. I realize my audience doesn't understand that MM is "right", so no sense in that.It might be right in Latin. It might even be one of the right choices in English. It is surely not the only right choice in English, and I don't think it's the preferred choice today.

Pseudolus
03-02-2011, 08:08 AM
How do I abbreviate $1,000,000? Report it on my taxes! Amiright?!

JMO
03-02-2011, 08:39 AM
How do I abbreviate $1,000,000? Report it on my taxes! Amiright?!
That will certainly reduce its size. ;)

Not Mike
03-02-2011, 09:15 AM
It might be right in Latin. It might even be one of the right choices in English. It is surely not the only right choice in English, and I don't think it's the preferred choice today.

I'm not sure it's an English/Latin issue. It's clearly not the only "right" choice in English (or maybe the US), which is why I'll use "M" at times because others don't realize that "MM" is a correct abbreviation.

This isn't really an issue of what's correct, it's an issue of what's accepted. For instance, most like to use "K,M,B" to denote Thousand, Million, Billion. If they really want to be consistent, they should should T,M,B or they should use K,G,T.

JMO
03-02-2011, 09:28 AM
This isn't really an issue of what's correct, it's an issue of what's accepted. For instance, most like to use "K,M,B" to denote Thousand, Million, Billion. If they really want to be consistent, they should should T,M,B or they should use K,G,T.

Thanks. I feel validated.

MountainHawk
03-02-2011, 09:52 AM
I'm not sure it's an English/Latin issue. It's clearly not the only "right" choice in English (or maybe the US), which is why I'll use "M" at times because others don't realize that "MM" is a correct abbreviation.

This isn't really an issue of what's correct, it's an issue of what's accepted. For instance, most like to use "K,M,B" to denote Thousand, Million, Billion. If they really want to be consistent, they should should T,M,B or they should use K,G,T.
K, M, G, T would seem reasonable as well.

Pseudolus
03-02-2011, 12:02 PM
or they should use K,G,T.

Wouldn't it be K,M,G,T? Aligning with the "-bytes" prefixes? Just "K, G, T" would be confusing.

Pseudolus
03-02-2011, 12:02 PM
K, M, G, T would seem reasonable as well.

What he said.

JMO
03-02-2011, 12:09 PM
More on 1000 vs. 1024 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix)

I was definitely not thinking of a magic 1024 for credibility.

silverfox
03-02-2011, 12:18 PM
Is that article where magic 1024 came from?

JMO
03-02-2011, 12:36 PM
Is that article where magic 1024 came from?
I already knew that 2^10 is 1024. The article just gives credibility to my comment. . .

I thought she was saying that K could be mistaken for full credibility standard (which I think is bullshit) of 1024.
And this is the part I was denying as the source of my initial remark.

Not Mike
03-02-2011, 12:38 PM
Wouldn't it be K,M,G,T? Aligning with the "-bytes" prefixes? Just "K, G, T" would be confusing.

Yes, that was my oversight, went straight from kilo to giga and right past mega.

Pseudolus
03-02-2011, 01:04 PM
Googling {"magic 1024" credibility} brings up sites about psychotropic fungi

ker8
03-02-2011, 06:09 PM
In general I use $1Mill or $1mill.

Actuary321
03-02-2011, 09:26 PM
Good thing numbers don't go up to 1,000,000,000B

I'm not sure it's an English/Latin issue. It's clearly not the only "right" choice in English (or maybe the US), which is why I'll use "M" at times because others don't realize that "MM" is a correct abbreviation.

This isn't really an issue of what's correct, it's an issue of what's accepted. For instance, most like to use "K,M,B" to denote Thousand, Million, Billion. If they really want to be consistent, they should should T,M,B or they should use K,G,T.I use K,M,B,T

K (Thousands) = 1,000
M (Millions) = 1,000,000
B (Billions) = 1,000,000,000
T (Trillions) = 1,000,000,000,000

epeddy1
04-07-2011, 06:06 PM
I worked at a brokerage in operations for a while, and 1M was pretty standard to mean 1000 when talking about number of shares of stocks, bonds, etc. It was on all the forms. I hated it.

1K = 1,000
1M = 1,000,000

Kris Kross
05-11-2011, 01:50 AM
1 million

QQQ
05-19-2011, 12:34 PM
I would call this rounding. If it was $100,000,000 then I would use $0.1B

Vomik
06-06-2011, 06:17 PM
I already knew that 2^10 is 1024. The article just gives credibility to my comment. . .


And this is the part I was denying as the source of my initial remark.

Still a little confused why you'd think people are speaking in base-2 and not base-10. Maybe I'm missing something but if you say K = 1024 but then go ahead and use M for 1,000,000 why aren't you using the same logic for M = 1,048,576

JMO
06-07-2011, 08:47 AM
Still a little confused why you'd think people are speaking in base-2 and not base-10. Maybe I'm missing something but if you say K = 1024 but then go ahead and use M for 1,000,000 why aren't you using the same logic for M = 1,048,576
K is commonly used in computer jargon, where it is naturally binary. M is in a business context. Somewhere in this thread there is a discussion of Greek vs. Latin prefixes, which follows a similar pattern. I would never use K with a $, but M (or m) is always with a currency symbol, such as $.

MountainHawk
06-07-2011, 09:43 AM
K is commonly used in computer jargon, where it is naturally binary. M is in a business context. Somewhere in this thread there is a discussion of Greek vs. Latin prefixes, which follows a similar pattern. I would never use K with a $, but M (or m) is always with a currency symbol, such as $.
M is computer jargon as well.

JMO
06-07-2011, 09:46 AM
M is computer jargon as well.
Sorry, my tekkie days are long past. In those olden times, we only went as high as K.
:heynow: :D

And my point was that it depends on context. Somehow for me, K implies a computer context while M (or m) doesn't.

Vomik
06-07-2011, 09:54 AM
K is commonly used in computer jargon, where it is naturally binary. M is in a business context. Somewhere in this thread there is a discussion of Greek vs. Latin prefixes, which follows a similar pattern. I would never use K with a $, but M (or m) is always with a currency symbol, such as $.

It's usually written as kB (or kb if referencing bit vs byte), but megabyte is written as MB (or Mb.) So technically a capital K is less confusing when it comes to computer terminology than capital M.

But I agree that I'd use whatever is common at the company I work at.

1695814
08-26-2011, 11:27 AM
http://excel.tips.net/T003528_Notation_for_Thousands_and_Millions.html?a wt_l=Ofnq2&awt_m=JcTct1AK3sQF4X


Notation for Thousands and Millions

Summary: When working with very large numbers in a worksheet, you may want the numbers to appear in a shortened notation, with an indication as to whether the number represents thousands or millions. There are a couple of ways you can utilize this type of notation, as discussed in this tip. (This tip works with Microsoft Excel 97, Excel 2000, Excel 2002, Excel 2003, and Excel 2007.)


Jim wonders how he can get Excel to automatically display numbers using "k" for thousands and "m" for millions. As an example, if a cell contains the value $470,000 he would like it displayed as $470k; if it contains the value $1,107,432 he would like it displayed as $1.1m.

One obvious method is to create a formula that will display the information as desired. The following formula will take into account the magnitude of the number in cell B2 and then provide a formatted text string appropriate to that magnitude:

=IF(B2 < 1000,B2,IF(B2 < 1000000,"$" & ROUND(B2/1000,1) & "k","$" & ROUND(B2/1000000,1) & "m"))Remember that this is a single formula and should be entered entirely on one line. The drawback with such an approach, of course, is that the formula takes up space within your worksheet. To get around this you could, instead, create a custom format that will simply affect the display of the number in the cell.

To create a custom format if you are using a version of Excel prior to Excel, choose Cells from the Format menu, display the Number tab, and click Custom at the left side of the dialog box. If you are using Excel 2007 then you should display the Home tab of the ribbon and click the small icon at the lower-right corner of the Number group. Again click Custom at the left side of the dialog box.
Here's the custom format you should actually use:
[>1000000]$#.0,,"m";[>1000]$#,"k";$#,##0

This format will display both millions and thousands using the desired notation. If the number is below a thousand then it will be displayed without any special notation. As appropriate, values are rounded to one decimal place.
Personally, I would use
[>1000000]$#.0,,"M";[>1000]$#,"k";$#,##0
but that's just me...and 126 other voters, I guess.

colby2152
08-27-2011, 04:03 PM
$1,000,000 = $1M
$1,000 = $1K

I go with lowercase... $1m / $1k

ElDucky
08-27-2011, 04:06 PM
Chump change

Pseudolus
08-27-2011, 04:20 PM
How do I abbreviate $1,000,000? Give it to my wife. Amiright, fellas?!

Hero3128
08-27-2011, 06:04 PM
Whatever you do, don't write "one million". People won't know what you're talking about. Seriously. I once gave a quiz to a class full of prospective engineers that included the words "Ten billion". About a third of the class did not know how much a billion was.

MathinTucson
08-29-2011, 08:24 AM
Whatever you do, don't write "one million". People won't know what you're talking about. Seriously. I once gave a quiz to a class full of prospective engineers that included the words "Ten billion". About a third of the class did not know how much a billion was.

A billion is ambiguous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales

JMO
08-29-2011, 09:02 AM
Whatever you do, don't write "one million". People won't know what you're talking about. Seriously. I once gave a quiz to a class full of prospective engineers that included the words "Ten billion". About a third of the class did not know how much a billion was.

That's because billion is truly ambiguous. In the US, it's 10^6, but in the UK, that's "a thousand million" and they save billion for 10^9.

ETA: Ahhhhh. Ninja'd
A billion is ambiguous.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_and_short_scales

Anyway, for an engineering class I would expect you to use scientific notation. That's NOT ambiguous.

Hero3128
08-30-2011, 01:24 PM
If you're in an AMERICAN classroom as I was, 1 billion = 1,000,000,000. How lame to use the excuse that a billion means something else in the UK. Do you also drive on the left side of the road in the USA, because that's what they do in the UK?