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actuary44
10-22-2011, 08:35 PM
Hi all!

Just finished CAS Exam 4 yesterday and got a preliminary pass. So now I'm here, hoping to get started soon. However, I'm kind of at a loss where to begin. Reading the text reference in the syllabus for Exam 5, it looks like most of those materials are available for free download. Are these materials enough? Or do I need a separate manual/source?

Looks like TIA has a whole online seminar on this, ACTEX has a study manual. Any of these necessary? Useful?

Any input as to what materials you all are using, and maybe how you would rate them, would be greatly appreicated!

Vorian Atreides
10-23-2011, 12:43 AM
For the time being, I would just get the two main sources (Friedland and Werner & Modlin) and start reading them and taking notes.

Most likely, you'll need to master Ch 7-10 in Friedland and Ch 4-8 in W&M and be solid on Ch 11-13 in Friedland and Ch 9 & 11 in W&M to do well on the Exam.

And these two text are pretty easy to read and get the general idea of what's going on. I wouldn't worry about a study guide until mid-Jan unless you have other obligations (like kids) that require a longer time-frame to approach your studying.

Also, you could do a quick search of prior threads that cover your specific question. Most that might have some insights are focused on their Exam sitting this next week and will not likely see your post until after Thanksgiving.

IKnewIt
10-27-2011, 12:09 PM
I highly recommend getting a study manual, because they'll have done the leg work of going through old exam 5 & 6 to find all the ones applicable to new 5. I can't imagine doing this by yourself.

I used ACTEX when I took and passed this last sitting, but I honestly hated it and strongly recommend not getting it. There were lots of typos, they'd repeat the same question a dozen times in the end of chapter questions since it's come up a dozen times in the last 30 years, and they included questions from VERY old exams with questionable applicability to today's exams. Most of that was probably done so they could advertise having 1100+ questions (I think that's the number they put, but it's been close to a year, so my memory is a bit fuzzy). Also, they specifically mentioned in some of their solutions that they weren't done the same way as the book does it... Why wouldn't they follow the procedure in the book? Beats me...

A coworker of mine used TIA to pass, and I'd highly recommend going that route. I took a look at some of the review questions and practice exams, and they were put together much better.

Staky41
10-27-2011, 12:31 PM
I used all10 --- the 2 original source materials are pretty condensed, and I thought it was just about exactly the same as my study manual. BUT - I think a study manual is totally worth the money just to have lots of practice questions & practice exams. I didn't pass last fall - but I think that was mainly due to not being prepared to take an upper level exam (first one). I was WAAAYYYY too slow. I didn't realize that you basically need to read the question and start answering it immediately with no delay.

It sounded to me like All10 and TIA are the most popular manuals. People have complaints about both. I thought All10 covered the material well with good practice questions/exams, but had tons of errors in it. I tried TIA for Exam 6 this sitting and it was good too, but I'm not really a fan of the online videos like most people are. They didn't have much for practice exams/problems for Exam 6 - but I think they have more for Exam 5 so that would be good. TIA is about double the price... so that might come into play in your decision too... or maybe not if your company is covering it.

snoo
10-27-2011, 01:20 PM
I highly recommend getting a study manual, because they'll have done the leg work of going through old exam 5 & 6 to find all the ones applicable to new 5. I can't imagine doing this by yourself.

I used ACTEX when I took and passed this last sitting, but I honestly hated it and strongly recommend not getting it. There were lots of typos, they'd repeat the same question a dozen times in the end of chapter questions since it's come up a dozen times in the last 30 years, and they included questions from VERY old exams with questionable applicability to today's exams. Most of that was probably done so they could advertise having 1100+ questions (I think that's the number they put, but it's been close to a year, so my memory is a bit fuzzy). Also, they specifically mentioned in some of their solutions that they weren't done the same way as the book does it... Why wouldn't they follow the procedure in the book? Beats me...

A coworker of mine used TIA to pass, and I'd highly recommend going that route. I took a look at some of the review questions and practice exams, and they were put together much better.

This. Go with TIA. I used TIA and bought Actex for extra problems (you won't need them). The Actex manual is such a clusterf*** I don't know how anyone could use it.

shug0972
10-27-2011, 02:11 PM
I used All10 for Exam 5 and TIA for exam 6. I thought All10 was adequate for Exam 5 since it was simply a reproduction of the two big texts that were very well written, but I did wasted quite a bit of time trying to spot many of the errors with the text / past paper question solutions etc. I was also not impressed by many of their practice exam questions which were simply not the style of question I would expect for the actual exam.

I managed to pass using only All10, but if I could choose again I would have probably gone for TIA instead after using them for Exam 6.

Bobby
10-27-2011, 11:14 PM
TIA is a must.

actuary44
10-27-2011, 11:22 PM
Thanks for all the comments and suggestions. I think I'm leaning towards TIA.

dballs33
12-20-2011, 01:29 PM
I was wondering... Is mastering TIA itself sufficient to pass? Or, do I need to read source article materials listed on the syllabus? My first upper-level exam here, and I always just resorted to mastering the study manuals and not worry about source materials.

edit: How about that CAS Study Kit purchasable online? I noticed it includes one of the source materials that is not free.

Vorian Atreides
12-20-2011, 05:23 PM
The source material is easy to read. I would recommend reading that first and then use study guides to supplement and help identify where to master the material.

You might find it worthwhile to get the Study Kit just to be familiar with the PAM. You'll get a copy of this for the Exam, and know where to find info can be very beneficial. (Note: not every Exam asks questions that require the PAM, but when they do, it's often really easy points.)

Wolf Follower
12-20-2011, 05:44 PM
I was wondering... Is mastering TIA itself sufficient to pass? Or, do I need to read source article materials listed on the syllabus? My first upper-level exam here, and I always just resorted to mastering the study manuals and not worry about source materials.

edit: How about that CAS Study Kit purchasable online? I noticed it includes one of the source materials that is not free.

FYI - the CAS Study Kit is actually just the PAM. I'd definitely get it though, for the reasons mentioned above.

WF

dballs33
12-20-2011, 10:19 PM
Thanks for the help! I'll get that kit. I actually posted that before I realized it's only $8 hah.