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Bama Gambler
10-24-2011, 10:07 PM
So I've signed up to coach my 5 y/o's basketball team. Any tips? Any books you recommend?

Devastator
10-24-2011, 10:43 PM
slide the feet on defense

MountainHawk
10-24-2011, 10:47 PM
hack-a-shaq is key. Kids can't hit free throws at that age.

Chuck
10-24-2011, 11:10 PM
1) Teach aggressiveness on defense - the other side has the ball - go take it from them.
2) On offense - everybody will want to move towards the ball all the time. Teach them to sometimes move towards the basket and away from the ball.
3) Shoot, shoot, shoot whenever they can - Law of large numbers.
4) Teach them to pass the ball - not to where their teammate is, but to an open space near them. Teach the receiver to move to the ball.
5) Rebounding - everyone runs to and under the basket. Teach them to take up space and push opponents away from the basket.

There are lots of fun drills to teach each of these things.

Force of Interest
10-25-2011, 01:08 AM
lots and lots of bounce passes, layups, and a proper defensive stance

llcooljabe
10-25-2011, 01:22 AM
http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/05/11/090511fa_fact_gladwell

A bunch of people were making fun of Gladwell for this article in the Grantland thread. I thought it was interesting. I don't know enough about Basketball to evaluate it though.

Andy The Clown
10-25-2011, 02:48 AM
So I've signed up to coach my 5 y/o's basketball team. Any tips? Any books you recommend?


Well 5/6 year olds cannot play basketball. Are you playing with a 10 foot basket?

My advice just teach ball skills and using both hands.

There is no reason for 5/6 to have a team ( if team means playing another team). It should just be dribble, dribble, dribble.

llcooljabe
10-25-2011, 10:05 AM
Well 5/6 year olds cannot play basketball. Are you playing with a 10 foot basket?

My advice just teach ball skills and using both hands.

There is no reason for 5/6 to have a team ( if team means playing another team). It should just be dribble, dribble, dribble.

Aren't all "leagues" for 5/6 yos like that? My kid's (5) been playing soccer for the past 3 years. they spend the first 40 min teaching skills, then they have a scrimmage with a couple of those pop up goals. My kid's gotten quite a bit better in the 3 years, simply bc they spend so much time teaching skills.

For bball, I would hope it's similar, no, for that age group?

tometom
10-25-2011, 11:24 AM
I remember that age. Just teach the fundamentals. Defense, passing, shooting, dribbling. The most important thing is probably dribbling. Kids that age get too focused on scoring, thus they only practice shooting, but being able to dribble around is more important on offense because you do it a larger percentage of the time than shooting.

I really liked that article that llcooljabe linked to. Not something I'd do at the 5/6 yo level because that age should really be about having fun, but I have no problem with the what the coach did on a 12 yo level.

I come from a school that was really small. My senior year we only had 8 guys on the basketball team and only 4 of us were any good, the other 4 guys subbed in and out freely. We were the best conditioned team in our league because we never got breaks. We were playing the #1 team in the state that had 3 times as many good players. We came out with a game plan to stall, keep the score low, but for some reason they chose to press us. (I think they figured since we only had 8 guys they could wear us down) Well, they learned pretty quick that we were twice as fast as them. We'd have the ball up the court and in the hoop before they knew what hit them. We were up 25-20 after 1Q. After that, they just sat back in a zone and let their tall players clog the lane so we couldn't do anything. We shot a decent % outside but not good enough to keep up with them. We were pressing which helped, but once they got in a half court set, they just had too many tall guys to guard and were getting easy buckets. We ended up losing like 88-75. But for an unranked small school it was pretty eye opening what we had done.

BG5150
10-25-2011, 11:39 AM
Teach the 1-3-1 3/4 court press-and-trap. Best defense there is.

gadzookz
10-25-2011, 12:13 PM
So I've signed up to coach my 5 y/o's basketball team. Any tips? Any books you recommend?

:wave:

Same here. My son played basketball last year, I helped a couple of times, and I have volunteered to asst coach this year. They've organized a coach's clinic for us next week. I'll let you know if I get any good tips.

I'm assuming your son is in an instructional league and not a competitive league at this age? If it's like my son's league, you will have a wide range of talent. From kids who struggle to reach the net when shooting, kids who are afraid of the ball, and other kids who can shoot from 10-15 feet away.

I believe the goals last year were 7 feet, and this year they look like 8 feet.

I've never coached basketball before, but have coached 5-8 year old baseball and martial arts. I'd say my general advice for this age group is (1) positive reinforcement in even the smallest things & (2) don't try to correct more than 1 or 2 things at a time. Kids can listen to and respond to a single correction. But if you telling them to do this with their feet and bend their knees and put their arms like this and aim for that, 9 times out of 10 they're going to do exactly what they did wrong the previous shot.

tommie frazier
10-25-2011, 12:16 PM
my kid had a program and it was all passing and dribbling and layups on a 7ft rim.

they never played games, but had skill comptetitions. dribble relay races, had to pass it without dropping, etc. most layups in a set time.

Keep It Real, Yo
10-25-2011, 12:20 PM
Make sure they all get a participation trohpy and are told that their future jobs will be rewarding and fulfilling

yankeetripper
10-25-2011, 12:32 PM
Wait until the 2nd practice to install the triangle offense.

Bama Gambler
10-25-2011, 12:40 PM
:wave:

Same here. My son played basketball last year, I helped a couple of times, and I have volunteered to asst coach this year. They've organized a coach's clinic for us next week. I'll let you know if I get any good tips.

I'm assuming your son is in an instructional league and not a competitive league at this age? If it's like my son's league, you will have a wide range of talent. From kids who struggle to reach the net when shooting, kids who are afraid of the ball, and other kids who can shoot from 10-15 feet away.

I believe the goals last year were 7 feet, and this year they look like 8 feet.

I've never coached basketball before, but have coached 5-8 year old baseball and martial arts. I'd say my general advice for this age group is (1) positive reinforcement in even the smallest things & (2) don't try to correct more than 1 or 2 things at a time. Kids can listen to and respond to a single correction. But if you telling them to do this with their feet and bend their knees and put their arms like this and aim for that, 9 times out of 10 they're going to do exactly what they did wrong the previous shot.Thanks! Yes noncompetitive. Last year they were not allowed to steal the ball from the other team. They had to stand on x on defense. It was pretty much - one kid dribbles ball down the court, defense stands on their x, kid shoots, everyone tries to rebound.

I think I'm going to try and make practice as fun as possible. I want the kids to enjoy coming to practice. We will run around a lot. I'd like to work on the fundamentals (dribbling, passing and shooting) but make it as fun as possible. If the kids are not sweating at the end of practice, then I failed. :)

Dr T Non-Fan
10-25-2011, 02:45 PM
I usually wait for some other sucker to volunteer.....


Oh....hmm....awkward.....

BG5150
10-25-2011, 03:53 PM
I think I'm going to try and make practice as fun as possible.
Hookers & Blow.

vito
10-26-2011, 01:18 PM
So I've signed up to coach my 5 y/o's basketball team. Any tips? Any books you recommend?
"The Art of War" by Sun Tzu.


On a more serious note, I coached my son's teams for several years. You will love working with the kids. The parents... not so much.

llcooljabe
10-26-2011, 01:39 PM
are parents of 5 yos that bad?

yankeetripper
10-26-2011, 01:42 PM
are parents of 5 yos that bad?

not usually. I've found the parents start to become dicks about age 9 when the parents become more cometitive about winning and are worried about you ruining their stars chance at a college scholarship. At 5-6 they just like to see their preciouses snowflakes running around semi-aimlessly.

yankeetripper
10-26-2011, 01:44 PM
I think I'm going to try and make practice as fun as possible. I want the kids to enjoy coming to practice. We will run around a lot. I'd like to work on the fundamentals (dribbling, passing and shooting) but make it as fun as possible. If the kids are not sweating at the end of practice, then I failed. :)

You already have your own best advice. If you make practice fun the kids will learn whether they know it or not.

And instilling good fundamentals in a positive way is the best way to prepare them for the next level when games start to count.

The Arbitrary
10-26-2011, 02:59 PM
You already have your own best advice. If you make practice fun the kids will learn whether they know it or not.

And instilling good fundamentals in a positive way is the best way to prepare them for the next level when games start to count.
Just make sure they have the fundamentals. I started coaching a team in 6th grade (I'm still with them 3 years later) and they couldn't dribble consistently with their strong hand, forget about the stuff they should have been doing at 10/11.

At 5/6 years old, focus on dribbling and passing skills wise on offense, and staying spread out from a strategy stand point. Best way to point that out is play a little monkey in the middle (they'll enjoy this) and show them how hard it is to play defense when they people on the outside are spread out. Also teach them to try to work toward the basket. It seems simple, but little kids take the easy way out and will pass out rather than try to work the ball in. But seriously, if you can get the kids to dribble well with their strong hand, and try to dribble with their off hand, and they can throw decent chest passes, you've done your job.

Defensively, just work on good position and active hands (trying to tip passes, going for rebounds). Have some fun by teaching them to box out, which at that age should really just be trying to get inside the other guy. Good drill is to have them work on sliding their feet while the guy their defending dribbles, but they're not allowed to steal it just shadow them.

If the league allows it, make them play man to man defense over zone. Zone is lazy, every kid should play man to man to learn the proper way to play defense. When they get old and lazy, that's when you play zone.

tommie frazier
10-26-2011, 03:03 PM
one last thing for practices-as many touches as possible. they don't learn by watching, and they get squirmy. have them engaged in something all the time.

vito
10-26-2011, 04:03 PM
one last thing for practices-as many touches as possible.
When you have a grown man with a bunch of 5 year old boys, I hope this is not interpreted incorrectly.

vito
10-26-2011, 04:13 PM
are parents of 5 yos that bad?
At around age 9-10, you'll get one or two parents who are convinced that their child is on the path toward a full-ride scholarship. They are always telling you how you need to do things better as a coach, specifically, how their child should have a more prominent role.

At age 5, the parents have good intentions, but can still be a problem. For example, parents love to show up at practices and coach from the sidelines. I'm not saying that their advice is any better or worse than mine as the coach, but the poor kids can't focus when they have 2-3 voices to respond to.

greenman
10-26-2011, 05:15 PM
One word: suicides

whisper
10-26-2011, 05:18 PM
So I've signed up to coach my 5 y/o's basketball team. Any tips? Any books you recommend?

Get an NBA player as a ringer.

Guerilla poster
10-26-2011, 06:11 PM
Is it like 5 year olds playing hockey, everyone crowds around the puck?

Mick Fan
10-26-2011, 11:34 PM
Is it like 5 year olds playing hockey, everyone crowds around the puck?

Or five-year olds playing soccer, aka "mob ball."

gadzookz
11-02-2011, 03:50 PM
Thanks! Yes noncompetitive. Last year they were not allowed to steal the ball from the other team. They had to stand on x on defense. It was pretty much - one kid dribbles ball down the court, defense stands on their x, kid shoots, everyone tries to rebound.

I think I'm going to try and make practice as fun as possible. I want the kids to enjoy coming to practice. We will run around a lot. I'd like to work on the fundamentals (dribbling, passing and shooting) but make it as fun as possible. If the kids are not sweating at the end of practice, then I failed. :)

You already have your own best advice. If you make practice fun the kids will learn whether they know it or not. Yes, definitely. At this age, fundamentals and making the sport fun are the primary goals, IMO.

At around age 9-10, you'll get one or two parents who are convinced that their child is on the path toward a full-ride scholarship. They are always telling you how you need to do things better as a coach, specifically, how their child should have a more prominent role.

At age 5, the parents have good intentions, but can still be a problem. For example, parents love to show up at practices and coach from the sidelines. I'm not saying that their advice is any better or worse than mine as the coach, but the poor kids can't focus when they have 2-3 voices to respond to.

Tips I read while coaching little league baseball was to not get into a confrontational situation with the parents. Say something to the effect of "that sounds like a good idea" and invite them to come out and help the team. Or to the yelling parent, ask if they would like to help out...you typically will have a portion of practice where the team is broken into smaller groups of 3-5 kids...have that parent work with the group that doesn't include their own kid so that their kid can practice in peace.

Thankfully, I just had one dad do this in little league on the first practice...after that the mother brought the kid to most of the practices.

gadzookz
11-02-2011, 04:54 PM
Have you had your first practice yet? Our first practice is coming up on Saturday, and our "coaches clinic" is tonight. I know we'll get team rosters and the practice/game schedule.

I have no idea what else is going on tonight. It could be anything from just an informational meeting (roster, rules, meet the other coaches) to actual instruction on how they want our practices to operate. My little league took the former approach. My asst coach and I met after this meeting but before our first practice to develop a practice plan. This worked well for baseball, and I would repeat this approach for basketball if Im not given any other direction. We had a 60-minute practice.

(A helpful basketball website I found that reinforces this is here (http://www.breakthroughbasketball.com/coaching/samplepractice1.html))

1. Team Meeting preferably less than 5 minutes. However, I think it went a little longer the 1st practice because we wanted to introduce coaches & have all the players introduce themselves. We had the players tell us their name, school, favorite sports team, etc.

After the first practice, this section definitely didn't take 5 minutes. We repeated any important safety rules (at this age in baseball, we had explicit rules about not having a bat unless given one by coach or parent.) We talked up the fun things we had planned for practice, and congratulated them on the prior practice/game acheivement.

2. Warm-ups 5-10 minutes not that kids at this age need much stretching, but any sort of running or group exercise gets the blood flowing, and helps work any nervousness and undirected excitement into a common athletic event. For baseball, this could be something as simple as running the bases. Play a quick game of Simon says. For basketball, perhaps something more entertaining than running a lap...dribbling a ball up and down the court. You could make 2-3 lines and make it a dribbling relay race.

3. Fundamentals and some drill to reinforce the fundamentals - 20-30 minutes. Here is where the team is typically broken into 2-4 groups. Each group focuses on a different fundamental. These should be fun types of drills, and most kids wont even realize that they are learning something.

4. Group game - 25-35 minutes. This could be scrimmage or other team games that focus on one of the fundamentals.

5. Wrap-up - end of practice. Congratulate team on good effort in practice. Verbally repeat/remind of any specific skill/fundamental topic that was the focus of that practice. All hand in "go team" type of cheer.

Candy! (the coaches took turns bringing something small for the kids. Fruit gummies and rice krispy treats were the common treat.) We let parents bring gameday snacks.


Some of my coaching tips from baseball experience:

Be early. My son's basketball coaches always arrived exactly when practice started, up to 5 minutes late. What a waste of time. Players who showed up early/on time were just shooting around and not getting any help.

I was at baseball practice 15 minutes early. Toward the end of the baseball season, I needed very little of this time to prep or talk with the other coach. So, we'd start warming up with the kids who showed up early. Typically, catching and throwing. More of the kids started showing up early, and that little bit really helped the ones who weren't getting any practice at home.

Repeated verbal recognition & compliments go a long way to encouraging and motivating your players. I've also found that using their name a lot helps them feel a personal connection, and it helps you remember names. I did OK with names, but my asst coach needed multiple practices to get names down.

Be flexible in your schedule. What I outlined above was a rough schedule. The practice before our first game, we spent almost the entire practice in a full scrimmage.

Have more drills than you plan to use. I went to practice with extra drills in my pocket that I could use in case (1) a drill I planned to use took up a lot less time than expected or (2) another drill was a flop with the kids. There were a lot of good baseball drills on the internet, and I also altered a few and made one up on my own.

Water breaks. I'm sure we'll need some with basketball. We definitely took breaks for outdoor baseball practice, especially on hot, sunny days.

Weekly e-mails. I sent an e-mail to all parents each week before the game. I had several parents thank me for this. It just included a brief reminder of the game, time of the game, which park, which diamond, request that kids arrive 5-10 minutes early (baseball games were on a time limit, and you could lose an inning if you don't start on time), and which family was in charge of snacks that week.

Team "mom" - it was nice having a parent other than one of the coaches organize the team snack schedule. My only role with this was to refer to it once a week and put the reminder in the weekly e-mail.

DixieFlyer
11-02-2011, 05:07 PM
When you have a grown man with a bunch of 5 year old boys, I hope this is not interpreted incorrectly.

it shouldn't be, unless the coach works for the TSA

AL THE LAB
11-02-2011, 05:15 PM
It really depends on what kind of coach you want to be. You can have the kids play "cheap" (cherry pick on missed shots, always have your 2 guards chase the opposing dribbler causing turnovers) so that they win every game by 10+ or teach them fundamentals so they have fun and learn. I've seen both.