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Packet_Storm
02-26-2002, 09:17 PM
I speak spanish on the side, and was wondering if language other than English is nessary in the field.

Troy McClure
02-26-2002, 09:34 PM
On 2002-02-26 20:17, Packet_Storm wrote:
I speak spanish on the side, and was wondering if language other than English is nessary in the field.



Not necessary, as most international business is done in English, but it can be a huge asset if you find the right position!

DW Simpson
02-26-2002, 09:46 PM
I concur that it's a huge asset. One example, we seem to always have Florida positions, working on international business, that require Spanish/English speakers.

Carlos
02-27-2002, 02:10 AM
El uso del español puede llegar a ser importante, pero no considero que su dominio sea indispensable.

Ditto for other languages.

In my opinion, a full command of one's own mother tongue is as important if not more, than devoting oneself to the exploration of other languages.

Elisha
02-27-2002, 02:27 AM
Claude,
I speak German OK from a couple of internships abroad, High School and College, anything overseas possible (only 2 exams, 1.5 years P&C exp) or do I pretty much need to at least have an ACAS?

Don Quijote
02-27-2002, 03:52 AM
Estoy de acuerdo con Carlos. La capacidad a comunicar y trabajar en un idioma adicional a ingles deberia abrir la puerta a algunos puestos / experiencias adicionales, pero estamos hablando al margin. Ud. no va a sentir limitada si solo domina ingles.

On the other hand, even in compition for jobs in an English environment, the second or third language can be advantage, showing some ability beyond mathematics and creativity / flexibility if you can really manage both languages well.

Of course, you can also read my book in the original!

Anonymous
02-27-2002, 07:57 AM
If there were a language other than English that would be important/advantageous/useful to know, which would you recommend?

DW Simpson
02-27-2002, 09:03 AM
Quote: Claude,
I speak German OK from a couple of internships abroad, High School and College, anything overseas possible (only 2 exams, 1.5 years P&C exp) or do I pretty much need to at least have an ACAS?

I found at least 1 casualty job in Germany in our database, but that is for an ACAS or FCAS. Although it's been humorously parodied, my advice would be to fill in a form (http://www.dwsimpson.com/cform.html), so that a recruiter can give you a more informed answer than I can. Certainly the probability of an actuarial student being placed into Europe isn't nearly as good as a designated actuary, but until a recruiter discusses your background with German firms, it's hard to say.

Quote: If there were a language other than English that would be important/advantageous/useful to know, which would you recommend?

While Spanish is sometimes required to work on Latin American/South American assignments based either there or in North America, a second language is rarely required for European actuarial positions. Especially since many of them are in Switzerland or the UK.

My rough guesstimate, from what I've seen, is that Mandarin Chinese is sometimes required for our positions. French is always helpful for jobs in Quebec. I can recall seeing Korean, too.

But Spanish is the one I see most often.

JO
02-27-2002, 10:00 AM
On 2002-02-27 06:57, Anonymous wrote:
If there were a language other than English that would be important/advantageous/useful to know, which would you recommend?


French is a good one as there are tons of jobs in the Montréal area. On a larger scale though, I would recommend Spanish as markets in South America are rapidly emerging..

Dr T Non-Fan
02-27-2002, 01:33 PM
You can proofread the Spanish brochures to make sure nothing is being promised that hasn't been priced for.

Anonymous
02-27-2002, 03:53 PM
I would recommend Spanish as markets in South America are rapidly emerging..

I wouldn't call it emerging.
According to the Economist, middle class people are flooding out of S/C America since early 1990. Guess where are they moving to?
US and Spain.
In the case of Spanish, you can receive the full reward of that lanuage skill without even moving out of the U.S. In many parts of CA, TX anf FL, non-latinos are the minorities.

DW Simpson
02-27-2002, 04:17 PM
Quote: I wouldn't call it emerging.

Reuters (http://www.reutersbusinessinsight.com/content/rbfs0031p.pdf) begs to differ.

JO
02-27-2002, 04:35 PM
Here you go!

Well I guess they must call it the "Big Five" now..

Anonymous
02-27-2002, 05:05 PM
D.W. Simpson,

The article was written in June well before the recent collapse of the Argentine economy.
People and capital are fleeing Argentina in droves.

A significant percentage of Argentines are of Italian decent. Italy grants those with Italian parentage (may include grandparents) immigration rights.

DW Simpson
02-27-2002, 05:42 PM
Ok. Here's a more recent one (http://www.millimanglobal.com/milliman_global_ii.html) on Chile then.

Yes, certainly the Argentina projection in that article is unfortunate, and I'm sure I could find a more recently written article. However, the Argentinian collapse doesn't portend South America's and Central America's demise. That was a unique situation that everyone is aware of.

The point remains valid that Spanish is an important language for international insurance markets. Unless it is your contention that hundreds of millions of people have moved en masse to the US & Spain.

Anonymous
02-27-2002, 06:00 PM
and here is the link from Economist's front page:
http://www.economist.com/world/la/displayStory.cfm?story_id=999559

sure there may be some money to be made in the insurance business, but how many of you are willing to move your whole family to a country where the middle class is fleeing?

DW Simpson
02-27-2002, 06:04 PM
I've lost track of what we're arguing about. I think rather than preach to me, since I must admit to not much of an opinion about it except to point to published information that I know exists, you should tell all the insurance companies & investment banks that are spending billions to acquire or build insurance companies in South & Central America to stop wasting their money and time. Because the Economist, the pre-eminent anti-American rag of our time, said so. (that last part is my opinion only, of course)

DW Simpson
02-27-2002, 06:08 PM
Quote: how many of you are willing to move your whole family to a country where the middle class is fleeing?

I just understood where you're coming from. I think you think that I'm advocating jobs there, when in fact I haven't mentioned that at all. The original example that I gave was that there are actuarial jobs based in Florida, looking for Spanish speakers, where an actuary would travel to South & Central America, but not be based outside the US, nor would their family.

Anonymous
02-27-2002, 06:20 PM
On 2002-02-27 17:08, D.W. Simpson Webmaster wrote:
Quote: how many of you are willing to move your whole family to a country where the middle class is fleeing?

I just understood where you're coming from. I think you think that I'm advocating jobs there, when in fact I haven't mentioned that at all. The original example that I gave was that there are actuarial jobs based in Florida, looking for Spanish speakers, where an actuary would travel to South & Central America, but not be based outside the US, nor would their family.


Yes, I've actually gotten calls from recruiters(but not from you Claude, when are you going to call me? I wait and wait by my phone everyday and sing Carly Simon's song when the phone rings...."it must be him, it must be him or I shall die"....:smile:. Just teasing Claude! ) about jobs in Florida working with companies in Latin America, travel required of course. I remember one call for a job in St Louis even. I guess, my Spanish name gives me away...Ricky Martin.

Guerilla poster
02-27-2002, 07:11 PM
Excuse me, the Economist is not anti-american. And it is definitely not a rag beats the crap out of anything this country calls a news magazine.

If you think the Economist is anti-American, you should really leave this country for once in your life and see what real anti-American media exists. The Economist is about as pro American a magazine as you can find that is published outside the US.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Guerilla poster on 2002-02-27 18:14 ]</font>

DW Simpson
02-27-2002, 07:22 PM
*Sigh*. I was a subscriber for 3 years until it started giving me a headache. You're right, it could be much worse.

Guerilla poster
02-27-2002, 07:24 PM
Agreed, it can cause a headache but generally it is very pro-American for a foreign media.

Enough Exams Already
02-28-2002, 08:50 AM
The original example that I gave was that there are actuarial jobs based in Florida, looking for Spanish speakers, where an actuary would travel to South & Central America, but not be based outside the US, nor would their family.


That wouldn't be too bad, even if it was extended travel (3-4 weeks at a pop) so long as it wasn't too frequent.

DW Simpson
03-07-2002, 03:09 PM
A position like this came in today -- Position #10548 (http://www.dwsimpson.com/cform.html?10548): Southeast firm seeks life reinsurance FSA; Spanish-speaker preferred. Work on reinsurer's Latin American book of business with a focus on pricing. Support the sales/marketing team; possibility that Latin American underwriters may report to this Fellow.