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View Full Version : Is it customary to tip a limo driver?


Course 4 Escapee
03-30-2004, 10:12 AM
I'm being picked up at the airport by a limousine hired by my company. Do I tip? If so, how much?

Double High C
03-30-2004, 10:17 AM
y wouldn't you?

(unless tip is prepaid)

Traci
03-30-2004, 10:31 AM
I would tip the same as for a comparable cab ride.

But it's been a while for me -- so I dunno -- maybe a $1 or so per 5 minutes?

aces219
03-30-2004, 10:39 AM
15%

aces219
03-30-2004, 10:40 AM
15% is customary. However, you may want to check with your company because many companies include the tip in the amount they pay the car service. I know that when I was interviewing, it was all taken care of, same thing when I took a limo to and from the airport for work.

Maine-iac
03-30-2004, 11:14 AM
I've rarely been in the situation, but when I was, the company prepaid the tip.

(If the company pre-paid for the limo but not the tip, how do you know what 15% is?)

Michel de Nostradamus
03-30-2004, 11:19 AM
I've rarely been in the situation, but when I was, the company prepaid the tip.

(If the company pre-paid for the limo but not the tip, how do you know what 15% is?)
In that case, I would pay $5 or $1-2/bag.

Buru Buru
03-30-2004, 11:33 AM
I was under the impression that you don't have to tip your company car service. The tip is always prepaid by the company. Or at least that was the case in the 2 companies that I worked for.

DW Simpson
03-30-2004, 11:51 AM
I tip regardless of whether it's pre-paid. You never know how much of the pre-paid tip made its way to the driver, and even if he received or will receive some or all, he still has to declare it. On the other hand, he can handle cash tips anyway he pleases with regards to the IRS.

I do the same thing with restaurant tips. If I pay the check with a credit card, the tip still gets paid in cash, since some restaurants pool their credit card tips and redistribute them, or worse.

Wigmeister General
03-30-2004, 12:14 PM
I'm being picked up at the airport by a limousine hired by my company. Do I tip? If so, how much?

10% is customary.

bm1729
03-30-2004, 12:21 PM
I do the same thing with restaurant tips. If I pay the check with a credit card, the tip still gets paid in cash, since some restaurants pool their credit card tips and redistribute them, or worse.
So then your waiter gets a share of ever other waiter's credit-card tips, but he gets to keep 100% of your tip? That would only be fair if everyone did what you did, in which case there would be no credit-card tips to begin with.

(Do I have too much time on my hands, Claude?)

DW Simpson
03-30-2004, 12:31 PM
The fair (http://www.actuary.ca/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=6050) is something that comes once a year, in October.

bm1729
03-30-2004, 12:37 PM
The fair (http://www.actuary.ca/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=6050) is something that comes once a year, in October.
:rofl:

yummy
03-30-2004, 09:47 PM
I would definitely suggest tipping the driver. Nevertheless, since it's the company who is providing the limo, I wouldn't stay within the customary limits of 10-15% as suggested, but would give whatever I myself feel like giving the guy (reasonable amount of course).
I am almost sure that the fee for the limo included some sort of tip.

Don Quijote
03-31-2004, 01:38 AM
My company includes the tip in the prearranged fare, and therefore, does not reimburse any additional tip you might give in cash. While that won´t stop me from tipping for what I think is exceptional service, it does stop me from adding in $10 just because I would for a taxi.

joeorez
03-31-2004, 07:14 AM
Ask the company whether they prepay the tip. If they do, it's up to the limo driver's company to give him his tip. Politely tell the driver the tip has been prepaid - in fact I write "INCLUDED" in the area of the form I sign.

I am sorry if the driver is not getting his tip from his employer, but I don't see why that is my problem - in effect I would be double charging MY employer for this when I submit my expenses.

DW Simpson
03-31-2004, 08:13 AM
I don't see why that is my problem - in effect I would be double charging MY employer for this when I submit my expenses.

The point is not submitting it to your employer. You can call it an expense for being human, if you will.

joeorez
03-31-2004, 01:41 PM
I don't see why that is my problem - in effect I would be double charging MY employer for this when I submit my expenses.

The point is not submitting it to your employer. You can call it an expense for being human, if you will.

Why stop with limo drivers? All those who feel you are not getting a fair compensation package from your employer step forward, so that we the public can make up the difference out of our own pockets.

DW Simpson
03-31-2004, 02:35 PM
That's why they call it discretionary income, Joe. We're free to use our discretion as to when and where to apply it.

The economic foundation isn't going to come crumbling down by slipping an occasional extra five or ten to people who perform services. I don't imagine that they're buying summer homes with the extra cash that they surreptitiously manage to squirrel away, it's more likely that they'll use it to buy lunch at one of the other jobs that they hold.

Legally Blonde
03-31-2004, 02:54 PM
Way to go Claude---I am with you.
And if the guy does manage to buy a house from all the tips he squirreled away, more power to him.

Wigmeister General
03-31-2004, 02:57 PM
May he furnish that house on the tips he didn't leave at the restaurant.