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Howard Mahler
11-01-2004, 01:32 PM
New England Actuarial Seminars Part 5 Seminars:
4 and a half days.
Taught by Sholom Feldblum (2 days) and Howard Mahler (2.5 days).
Rosemont, Illinois (Outside Chicago): March 17-21, 2005.
Iselin, New Jersey: March 20-24, 2005.

The registration form for Spring 2005 is up.

http://www.neas-seminars.com/Misc/

My Study Aids as well as the Study Schedule will be sent upon registration.

This is my third year teaching Part 5, and I have again expanded my study aids: 645 pages, 285 past exam questions, and 324 other questions.
(Study Aids not sold separately.)

I do not know when Sholom's study aids will be ready.

Howard Mahler

Mahler Study Aids for use in Spring 2005 Exam 5 Seminars
1 McClenahan, “Ratemaking”
2 Bouska, “Exposure Bases Revisited”
3 Schofield, “Going from a Pure Premium to a Rate”
4 Werner, “Incorporation of Fixed Expenses” (new)
5 Jones, “An Introduction to Premium Trend”
6 Anderson, “Insurance to Value”
7 Kelley, “Homeowners Ins. to Value - An Update”
8 Finger, “Risk Classification”
9 Krakowski, “Quantifying the Impact of Non-Modeled Catastrophes on Homeowners Exp.”
10 Burger, et. al., “Incorporating a Hurricane Model into Property Ratemaking”
11 Brown & Schmitz, “Study Note Reading on Deductibles.”
12 Marker & Mohl, “Rating Claims-Made Insurance Policies”
13 Boor, “A Macroeconomic View ...” & “The Impact of the Insurance Economic Cycle ...”
14 Bourdon, “An Introduction to Capitation and Health Care Provider Excess Insurance”
15 Tiller-Sherwood “Individual Risk Rating”
16 “Statement of Principles Regarding Property and Casualty Insurance Ratemaking”, and “Standard of Practice: Trending Procedures in Property/Casualty Insurance Ratemaking”
17 Prevosto, “Study Note: ISO Statistical Plans”, and
Moncher, “Study Note: NCCI Data Collection Calls and Statistical Plans”[/b]

The Barber of Seville
11-01-2004, 03:57 PM
I'm not a fan of exam seminars. So many students are looking for an easy way out. They think they'll go to this exam seminar, and some brilliant speaker will open up all the mysteries to them and make everything clear. By listening to some speaker for a few hours, they'll save themselves hundreds of hours of work.

But it don't work like that. In reality, exam sems turn out to be a bunch of young'uns sitting in a hot room falling asleep, because they stayed out too late partying and playing games with the other kids.

Listen, friends, and I'll let you in on a little secret. There is nothing on the CAS syllabus that is so incredibly difficult that you can't learn it on your own. If you want to pass, you just need to hole up in a quiet room and learn the material. There are no shortcuts. It's just something you gotta do, and no exam sem is going to make it any easier. So spend that time and money doing it on your own. That way, you can take breaks when you want, you can go at your own pace, and you don't have to waste time in transit, or time listening to something that you already know.

Be like Mike, and Tiger, and all the other Nike spokesmen:

Just do it.

Avi
11-01-2004, 04:01 PM
/yawn

de gustibus non est disputandum

JTBenson
11-01-2004, 04:40 PM
Barber,
To each his own. One style works best for you. That style didn't work for me. I struggled with the material until the exam seminars. I ALWAYS felt I knew the material much better the week after the seminar than before. There are some seminars that were useless, but for most of them, they really helped me.

GefilteFish144
11-01-2004, 04:54 PM
In general seminars work, but you have to go in having spent a significant amount of time studying (say, 150-200 hours). If you come into a seminar expecting to learn the material from scratch, you're wasting your time.

I found that the Exam 9 seminar was very helpful, as there were a number of concepts I learn that I know helped me on the exam. And even if my attention span wanders part of the time, I know I can always look to the study aids afterwards.

Macavity
11-01-2004, 05:50 PM
Yeah I learned that out the hard way. I did <10 hours of studying before my seminar for Exam 3 and 4 and came out of the seminar so well prepared, knowing exactly what I needed to do to pass, and increasing my knowledge and ability by a huge %.

That don't work on upper level CAS/SOA exams, and I got skull screwed at my last seminar :( Gotta put in ~100 hours or so to benefit from these seminars, unless you've seen tons of the material on the job.

ThE BlacK ScoRpioN
11-01-2004, 08:40 PM
I'm not a fan of exam seminars. So many students are looking for an easy way out. They think they'll go to this exam seminar, and some brilliant speaker will open up all the mysteries to them and make everything clear. By listening to some speaker for a few hours, they'll save themselves hundreds of hours of work.

But it don't work like that. In reality, exam sems turn out to be a bunch of young'uns sitting in a hot room falling asleep, because they stayed out too late partying and playing games with the other kids.

Listen, friends, and I'll let you in on a little secret. There is nothing on the CAS syllabus that is so incredibly difficult that you can't learn it on your own. If you want to pass, you just need to hole up in a quiet room and learn the material. There are no shortcuts. It's just something you gotta do, and no exam sem is going to make it any easier. So spend that time and money doing it on your own. That way, you can take breaks when you want, you can go at your own pace, and you don't have to waste time in transit, or time listening to something that you already know.

Be like Mike, and Tiger, and all the other Nike spokesmen:

Just do it.

I think you forgot the :viola:

Vegas or Bust
11-01-2004, 09:59 PM
Thank you Mr. Mahler. I was on the NEAS site this afternoon looking for the date of your seminar. I'll see you in Chicago.

Ginda Fisher
11-01-2004, 10:54 PM
I took a lot of seminars, and I generally paid fees and expenses out of my own pocket, so I guess that's an endorsement.

There was very little on the syllabus that I couldn't have learned on my own. But I found good seminars to be valuable:

1) There were a couple of topics (notably accounting) where I had so little background that I didn't know where to start. I found a seminar invaluable.
2) There were several harder papers that I'm quite sure I could have mastered on my own, but for which I found seminars a very efficient way to study. That is, I think it took fewer hours to master the material with the help of a seminar. The Brown paper on minimum bias is one example. (Since replaced a couple of times with papers I find more accessible, but there's always something hard.)
3) For some of the easy-but-overwhelming quantity stuff (the old part 8, now 7) I found sitting in a seminar a refreshing change of pace, and no less efficient than studying on my own. I needed some refreshment halfway through studying for that exam. I'm not sure I would have paid entirely out of pocket for this one, though.
4) Seminars are a great place to network. You meet your peers from dozens of companies. I found two jobs indirectly through contacts I made at seminars. You might not want to stress this particular benefit while trying to talk your boss into funding your trip. . .and I don't think it's worth the time and price of admission, but it's a valuable fringe benefit.

Everyone studies differently. I was able to concentrate through most of a "five days of hell" ordeal, so I could get a lot out of a semimar. Some people do better with lots of smaller doses and might find them less valuable. Some seminars are terrible - I skipped the Part 6 seminar because a friend had gone the prior year and a full day was spent with the "instructor" reading questions, and having the students "vote" on the correct multiple choice answer. (He stopped doing them years ago.) I think my probability seminar hurt me in the long run, because it led me to believe I could get though stats by memorizing formulas, when I actually needed to understand them. But a good seminar is time well spent for many people.

Student2002
11-02-2004, 12:55 PM
I attended NEAS Exam 5 seminar in 2003... yada-yada-yada, I will be writing it again in 2005. [The seminar was VERY helpful, but I just need more practice and more hours.] I have Mr. Mahler notes for most readings, and I was wondering if it is possible to get just an update of the notes. I don't see any point going to the seminar again, particularly since my company will not pick up any cost.

MNBridge
11-02-2004, 01:09 PM
Barber would you also recommend that students do not attend college.

Just buy the textbooks and learn the material. :shake:

GefilteFish144
11-02-2004, 01:58 PM
I attended NEAS Exam 5 seminar in 2003... yada-yada-yada, I will be writing it again in 2005. [The seminar was VERY helpful, but I just need more practice and more hours.] I have Mr. Mahler notes for most readings, and I was wondering if it is possible to get just an update of the notes. I don't see any point going to the seminar again, particularly since my company will not pick up any cost.

Syllabus doesn't change all that much from one exam to the next, so any new or updated readings are fairly easy to pick up yourself. If you can get a new All 10 that's almost as good as Mahler's notes. I've found that when new readings are added questions tend to be straightforward. The longer a reading is on the syllabus, the more they try to trick you, and that's where seminars help the most.

Wesley_Willis
11-02-2004, 02:03 PM
WTF dude. H.M.'s just trying to drum up some business and make some c$sh money. No one cares if you don't like going to seminars.

Student2002
11-08-2004, 02:03 PM
WTF dude. H.M.'s just trying to drum up some business and make some c$sh money. No one cares if you don't like going to seminars.

Wrong! Actually Mr. Mahler contacted NEAS and asked them to make a price for his notes only (since I am a past seminar attendee), which was very nice of him. Thank you Mr. Mahler!

horsePower
11-08-2004, 02:38 PM
I wish NEAS wouldn't be so cheap on postage and send out the study notes earlier.

I took Part 9 last sitting and didn't get to read through a lot of the notes because by the time I got them (at the seminar) I didn't have enough time to read them (500 pages on experience rating and retrospective rating :roll: )

And the recommended reading schedule is pretty useless after you have already read through the papers.

Wesley_Willis
11-08-2004, 03:21 PM
WTF dude. H.M.'s just trying to drum up some business and make some c$sh money. No one cares if you don't like going to seminars.

Wrong! Actually Mr. Mahler contacted NEAS and asked them to make a price for his notes only (since I am a past seminar attendee), which was very nice of him. Thank you Mr. Mahler!

a) I was replying to BoS, not you.
b) What you said still doesn't negate my main point.

:horse: :horse: :horse:

Student2002
11-08-2004, 03:32 PM
Wesley,

Oh, so your earlier post was to The Barber of Seville! I was under the [wrong] impression that it was addressed to me. Now I kind of see it [the post] from a new perspective.

GefilteFish144
11-08-2004, 03:43 PM
I wish NEAS wouldn't be so cheap on postage and send out the study notes earlier.

I took Part 9 last sitting and didn't get to read through a lot of the notes because by the time I got them (at the seminar) I didn't have enough time to read them (500 pages on experience rating and retrospective rating :roll: )

And the recommended reading schedule is pretty useless after you have already read through the papers.

Yep, I ran into that problem as well. I was slogging through those hundreds of pages of experience and retro rating till I realized that much of the stuff he went over was somewhat useless. And getting the recommended study schedule in September was a joke! But on the bright side, it will really help us out in our studying next year. :shake:

Howard Mahler
12-03-2004, 03:34 PM
bump

great3981
12-11-2004, 05:18 PM
Wrong! Actually Mr. Mahler contacted NEAS and asked them to make a price for his notes only (since I am a past seminar attendee), which was very nice of him. Thank you Mr. Mahler!

Any progress on this front? I am not as big a fan of the seminars, but I will definitely have to order a manual and I understand that you and Feldblum's are better than All 10.

Howard Mahler
12-11-2004, 09:24 PM
NEAS Part 5 Study Aids are not sold separately.

I have made special arrangements for people who took the seminar in the past.

Howard Mahler


Wrong! Actually Mr. Mahler contacted NEAS and asked them to make a price for his notes only (since I am a past seminar attendee), which was very nice of him. Thank you Mr. Mahler!

Any progress on this front? I am not as big a fan of the seminars, but I will definitely have to order a manual and I understand that you and Feldblum's are better than All 10.