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Anonymous
10-12-2001, 01:42 PM
I am wondering if anybody got any offer during the last month. It seems that bad economy does have a negative impact on actuarial field. One of my friend who lost his job in Sep.11 attack is still looking for a job.

Anonymous
10-12-2001, 01:49 PM
I got an offer last week, but it was way low. I have worked with some of the larger consulting offices with good benefits. I figured this small company would have lesser benefits, but I thought they would make it up with salary. I was way wrong. When I left my last employer, I was making X and due for a raise, this company offered my 7% less than X. Even though the job market in NYC SUCKS right now, I'd rather collect unemployment than set myself back by so much!

Patience
10-12-2001, 02:21 PM
I got a call from one recruiter who said he was loaded with possibilities for pre-ASA.

I gave him this site to do some fishing.

Huki
10-12-2001, 02:24 PM
On 2001-10-12 13:49, Anonymous wrote:
When I left my last employer, I was making X and due for a raise, this company offered my 7% less than X. Even though the job market in NYC SUCKS right now, I'd rather collect unemployment than set myself back by so much!


Wow, X must be pretty low to start with if unemployment looks better than 0.93*X.

Anonymous
10-15-2001, 07:11 PM
It's not that X was so low, in fact, it is because X was pretty high that I am not willing to take a 7% pay cut right now. By not working, I have been studying my ass off and am virtually guaranteed to pass in November. I'd rather wait for the right offer than take such a large paycut.

davespencer
10-18-2001, 07:43 AM
The job market is pretty much as it has been all year. Lots of pre-associate and associate level positions, very few fellowship slots, although I've seen an increase in those this past month. Flexibility on geography is the key to maximizing your options.

DW Simpson
10-18-2001, 08:54 AM
We have seen little change in the strong actuarial job market, and with Fellowship positions in proportionally just as great supply as student and Associate opportunities. In fact, we have approximately 2,300 open actuarial jobs in our database as I write this, whereas at the beginning of the year, it was closer to 1,500.

Anonymous
10-18-2001, 09:33 AM
Anonymous2 to Anonymous: You seem to lack common sense. You choose to forego a few months of salary in order to avoid a pay cut of - what? $5000 tops if you're still a student? - and that's spread out over a year so at roughly $400 a month. Way to go. You stand to lose a few thousand dollars a month by not working - but you saved that $400! Maybe you can buy a rack to store all of that whine. You should have stayed on at your old employer until you found a better job elsewhere.

Anonymous
10-18-2001, 01:39 PM
New Anon to Anon2:

Let's take a look at this:

Anon takes the job with a 7% pay cut. He goes back to WORK, doing the same job for less money. It takes him a year, or two, to return to his previous salary level. Then the pay raises continue normally beyond that.

Or,

he takes some time off, relaxing. He obviously is not worried about money, otherwise he would have found another job before leaving his previous position. He stays unemployed for one year (assuming worse than any likely worse case scenario) and returns to work at the same level of pay. Pay increases continue normally beyond that.

In scenario two, he ends up in the same position as scenario one, except he just got to take a year sabbatical.

Which would you prefer?

davespencer
10-21-2001, 09:52 AM
In my years of experience, I have found many employers leery of hiring somebody who has been out of work 6 or more months. Staying out an entire year is a risky gamble.

Anonymous
10-22-2001, 09:25 AM
to dave spencer:

Flexibility on geography is the key to maximizing your options.

what does this mean, that to get a job you have to move to some hell hole like NY, NJ, Boston, or Connecticut?

an2001on
10-22-2001, 10:52 AM
Afghanistan would probably be closer to hell hole now

Anonymous
10-22-2001, 10:53 AM
On 2001-10-22 09:25, Anonymous wrote:
what does this mean, that to get a job you have to move to some hell hole like NY, NJ, Boston, or Connecticut?


looks like someone woke up on the wrong side of the bed this morning.
what are you? Osama bin Hicks?
or you just upset that NY yankee is heading to another world series

the dude was merely saying that you can get more jobs opp. if you are willing move. I don't see any reference to any particular part of the U.S.
chill out bud, sit your azz down and have some fried okra

kooky cookie
10-23-2001, 10:53 AM
davespencer said:
"Lots of pre-associate and associate level positions, very few fellowship slots..."

Is the market usually more favorable for ASAs than FSAs?

In your experience, what's the salary differential for two people w/ same years of experience, etc, and the only difference being one is ASA, the other is FSA?

Thanks!!

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: kooky cookie on 2001-10-23 10:54 ]</font>

DW Simpson
10-23-2001, 12:24 PM
We're seeing that the market is equally favorable for Associates vs. Fellows.

Here is a chart lifted from our <font face="arial">salary survey</font> (http://www.dwsimpson.com/salary.html) that compares total compensation (salary + bonus) at similar years of experience. These are for the middle 80% of actuaries regarding compensation -- the ranges represent the 10th percentile and 90th percentile. The top 10% and the bottom 10%, in terms of compensation, of actuaries are excluded. The data are through last month ("N/A" = Not Available due to limited information):

<table align="center" border="1"><tr><td>Life & Health
Yrs. of Exp.</td><td>ASA range</td><td>FSA range</td></tr>
<tr>
<td>3-4 years</td><td>64-78K</td><td>N/A</td></tr>
<tr><td>5-6 years</td><td>67-85K</td><td>80-107K</td></tr>
<tr><td>7-9 years</td><td>70-94K</td><td>88-127K</td></tr>
<tr><td>10-14 years</td><td>74-127K</td><td>99-135K</td></tr>
<tr><td>15+ years</td><td>82-195K</td><td>105-225K</td></tr>
</table>

<table align="center" border="1"><tr><td>Pension
Yrs. of Exp.</td><td>ASA range</td><td>FSA range</td></tr>
<tr>
<td>3-4 years</td><td>67-83K</td><td>N/A</td></tr>
<tr><td>5-6 years</td><td>71-97K</td><td>82-105K</td></tr>
<tr><td>7-9 years</td><td>73-100K</td><td>95-136K</td></tr>
<tr><td>10-14 years</td><td>79-135K</td><td>113-160K</td></tr>
<tr><td>15+ years</td><td>105-205K</td><td>120-280K</td></tr>
</table>

Claude

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: D.W. Simpson Webmaster on 2001-10-23 12:26 ]</font>

Anonymous
11-19-2001, 11:29 PM
hi
I wanted to know if anyone would be willing to take me on as a volunteer unpaid intern. I dont have a work permit but I can undertake volutary work.
I have a Master's degree in economics and about a years experience in statistical modelling with a very good company. I am planning to take both exam 1 & 2 in May 2002. I should have a proper work permit by March 2002.
Any takers?

Anonymous
11-20-2001, 12:17 AM
If your work is satisfactory at the end of the trial period, we'll double your salary. Fair enough?

davespencer
11-30-2001, 08:47 AM
What city do you want. I've helped one other person with the same situation. 770-929-0528

Anonymous
12-04-2001, 06:37 PM
On 2001-11-30 08:47, davespencer wrote:
What city do you want. I've helped one other person with the same situation. 770-929-0528

Hi,
I am looking for oppurtunities in the Los Angeles region. I tried to contact you at that number but I guess you must have gone out. I've sent you a mail at the address listed with your message,I hope you dont mind.
Thanks a ton!