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View Full Version : How to get revenge on a terrible landlord


cheeznstix
03-22-2005, 04:41 AM
Most of us have probably had bad experiences with landlords. I feel like I have hit an all time low with my current landlord. I won't bore you with the details, but my current situation is completely ridiculous. Many of my neighbors at my apartment complex and I are outraged and we just want revenge. So please, all of you clever actuaries out there, how do we give management a taste of their own medicine without incurring any liabilities on ourselves? No lectures on playing nice, please. That time has come and gone. Revenge is the name of the game now. (Note: We are poor and cannot afford to hire attornies and hold management accountable for their legal responsibilities.)

Loner
03-22-2005, 06:53 AM
You don;t necessarily need to hire an attorney - sometimes a call to the fire inspector will get them in a heap of trouble if they have code violations.

It could also land you on the street if your building gets condemned.

Pseudolus
03-22-2005, 06:57 AM
Live well?

Tim><
03-22-2005, 08:26 AM
Get together and run a giant meth lab. The Narcs will tear the place up eventually.

IAm@Work.com
03-22-2005, 08:47 AM
...I feel like I have hit an all time low with my current landlord. I won't bore you with the details, but my current situation is completely ridiculous....This group is going to want to fit the punishment to the crime. Without even a clue as to what you are suffering, you will not get useful suggestions. For all we know your "all time low" is that he wants the rent on time when the prior landlord always gave you an extra week. I'm guessing it's more than that, but until you tell us, we only have our imaginations.

Happy Salvador
03-22-2005, 08:54 AM
Hire some goons to beat the snot out of him.

Darth Tater
03-22-2005, 09:13 AM
Simple:

All you need is a screwdriver, funnel (Heck, make one out of paper), and 5 lbs of sugar. So far sounds cheap, eh?

Before you are ready to move out (one or two days before), unscrew as many of the panels from the light switches as you see fit. Then, use the funnel to pour the sugar into the walls of the structure. Put the panels back on and clean up any traces of the sugar -- destroy all objects used in this event. Within a month, there should be an infestation of a variety of ants, roaches and likely a number of other crunchy critters.

Enjoy.

Jack
03-22-2005, 09:28 AM
Does the dispute have anything to do with heat? A friend of mine lived in an apartment where the thermostat was locked and the temp in the apartment was often in the low 50's.

What he did was put a metal tray with ice cubes on top of the thermostat and covered it with a plastic bag. His apartment was warm and toasty from that point on.

Westley
03-22-2005, 09:38 AM
Are there rules about putting signs in your windows (read your lease)?

Signs of "Horrible landlord" and "Don't live here" or "Call 201 555 1212 to find out why I hate this place" tend to have an impact on future rentals.

Griffin 9
03-22-2005, 09:42 AM
This group is going to want to fit the punishment to the crime. Without even a clue as to what you are suffering, you will not get useful suggestions.No we won't. If revenge is worth taking, then it's worth taking to the extreme.

Snageye
03-22-2005, 09:48 AM
dont do anything rash

Griffin 9
03-22-2005, 09:53 AM
The sugar and the meth lab are good, emotionally healthy ways to get your revenge. If you know when prospective tenants are being shown apartments, then that's a good time to put out empty boxes of rat poison.

Griffin 9
03-22-2005, 09:54 AM
"Call 201 555 1212 to find out why I hate this place" tend to have an impact on future rentals.I called that number, and got directory assistance in Hackensack, New Jersey.

MountainHawk
03-22-2005, 09:56 AM
I called that number, and got directory assistance in Hackensack, New Jersey.

Isn't that enough of a reason to hate living there?

E. Blackadder
03-22-2005, 10:03 AM
It would truly be inapproprate to suggest revenges without knowing what they're for. :D . If you can't be bothered to fill us in, we can't be bothered to tell you how to make the landlord's life a living heck.

Of course, if you think the landlord reads this forum, then sure, keep your cloak of anonymity on.

lawfi5h
03-22-2005, 10:05 AM
When you move out, put saran wrap on the top of all the toilets.


Comedy will ensue.

Loner
03-22-2005, 10:14 AM
Go to the durty bookstore. Find the nastiest magazines you can.
Take out the subscription cards.
Fill in his name and address.

GadgetGeek
03-22-2005, 10:19 AM
How important is your security deposit? Are you moving out soon?

alt.shenanigans and alt.revenge newsgroups used to have some good ideas in them. Haven't checked them lately.

Apollywog
03-22-2005, 10:22 AM
Go to the durty bookstore. Find the nastiest magazines you can.
Take out the subscription cards.
Fill in his name and address.
That's what I have suggested to my friend who hated her manager. And of course, have those magazines mailed to his office...!

Brad Gile
03-22-2005, 10:22 AM
Simple:

All you need is a screwdriver, funnel (Heck, make one out of paper), and 5 lbs of sugar. So far sounds cheap, eh?

Before you are ready to move out (one or two days before), unscrew as many of the panels from the light switches as you see fit. Then, use the funnel to pour the sugar into the walls of the structure. Put the panels back on and clean up any traces of the sugar -- destroy all objects used in this event. Within a month, there should be an infestation of a variety of ants, roaches and likely a number of other crunchy critters.

Enjoy.

That sounds like felonious destruction of property to me. Do that on my rental property and I'll be happy to relocate you in jail. :)
Do you really advocate criminal activity?


Brad

Lee Mellon
03-22-2005, 10:26 AM
The meth lab idea is quite effective. If there's been a lab on the property, the property is considered contaminated and usually irredeemable. He can keep it but cannot rent without warning and the resale value is in the toilet. If you get caught though, you can spend time with some really interesting people.

Mold. Dryrot. Insects.

If you get everybody in the building to flush at the same time you can probably blow out the main. Could be expensive to the flushers once the conspiracy was broken.

Maxprime
03-22-2005, 10:27 AM
You can always report him to the BBB or something of the sort (in Texas we have a Landlord association similar to that). But if you do something illegal, you're going to be the one who gets screwed in the end.

My suggestion? Do stupid pranks like spamming the everliving daylights out of him (mail, phone, email, etc.) or set up an autodialer to call him every hour of the night. :)

Westley
03-22-2005, 10:29 AM
Of course there's the old pizza delivery trick - just make sure Domino's doesn't have caller ID.

Apollywog
03-22-2005, 10:34 AM
or the month before your lease ends, start making a mess in the apartment and not clean up at all....!

Titania
03-22-2005, 10:47 AM
DON'T damage the property outright. I know someone who made a bad choice of roomate (who decided to destroy the apartment before he moved out, long story), and now my buddy's getting sued.

I like the sugar/insect idea...it's hard to show that you deliberately started the infestation if you clean of the sugar on moving day.

I like loner's dirty magazine idea, too. :lol:

Maine-iac
03-22-2005, 12:15 PM
If the landlord is truly lousy, then the sugar thing is going to be a trial and a hassle to the new tenant, not to the care-for-nothing landlord.

This revenge thing is childish. If the guy is a bad landlord, find out what your legal options are. If you can't afford a lawyer, contact your local version of Legal Aid. Landlord/tenant issues are one of the main categories that they deal with. They know what your options are, and you might do some real good instead of making things worse for the next sucker of a tenant.

GadgetGeek
03-22-2005, 12:59 PM
Another idea that keeps your nose clean and makes his life miserable would be to get all the tenants who agree his is a lousy landlord to give notice in the same month. That will mess with his cash flow and leave him scrambling to get x units ready to lease at the same time and find new tenants etc.

Griffin 9
03-22-2005, 01:03 PM
This revenge thing is childish.That's why the RF is the perfect place to ask this question.

The Waiting Hurts
03-22-2005, 01:48 PM
(Note: We are poor and cannot afford to hire attornies and hold management accountable for their legal responsibilities.)Most places have free legal counsel that can give you advice about what to do and how to get your landlord to live up to their responsibilities. Sometimes all it takes is a simple call (threat) from a lawyer.

Can you and your building mates take him to landlord/tenant court about the issuse you are having? I can't imagine that it's >$100 to file the papers (actually, I can't imagine that it's much >$60, obviously this varies by state), which you can do yourself, you don't need a lawyer.

Loner has a good idea with calling building inspections. You'd be surprised how far this can go.

Westley
03-22-2005, 01:57 PM
Most places have free legal counsel that can give you advice about what to do and how to get your landlord to live up to their responsibilities. Sometimes all it takes is a simple call (threat) from a lawyer.

Can you and your building mates take him to landlord/tenant court about the issuse you are having? I can't imagine that it's >$100 to file the papers (actually, I can't imagine that it's much >$60, obviously this varies by state), which you can do yourself, you don't need a lawyer.

Loner has a good idea with calling building inspections. You'd be surprised how far this can go.Quit responding and Go Study!

Maine-iac
03-22-2005, 02:03 PM
This revenge thing is childish.

That's why the RF is the perfect place to ask this question.Point taken. :)

Werewolf
03-22-2005, 02:05 PM
Place some kind of food behind the outlets, something that will really smell when it decomposes. Then move out.

Darth Tater
03-22-2005, 03:06 PM
That sounds like felonious destruction of property to me. Do that on my rental property and I'll be happy to relocate you in jail. :)
Do you really advocate criminal activity?


Brad

I endorse, to some degree, whatever someone is willing to endure the punishment for and that they can justify to themsleves. Sanity is relative of course.

Would I participate in something like this? You can decide...I own my own home now....but I like you would attempt to "relocate" someone that I felt did this to me as well.

FWIW...I'd say you might have a tough time proving that someone did such a thing unless you read it on a forum like this.

This will be my last post on this issue...I think this person is possibly a troll and is jsut fishing for responses.

Of course I don't endorse this sort of thing...I am a tax paying, law abiding citizen -- mostly.

Emily
03-22-2005, 05:56 PM
Simple:

All you need is a screwdriver, funnel (Heck, make one out of paper), and 5 lbs of sugar. So far sounds cheap, eh?

Before you are ready to move out (one or two days before), unscrew as many of the panels from the light switches as you see fit. Then, use the funnel to pour the sugar into the walls of the structure. Put the panels back on and clean up any traces of the sugar -- destroy all objects used in this event. Within a month, there should be an infestation of a variety of ants, roaches and likely a number of other crunchy critters.

Enjoy.

That sounds like felonious destruction of property to me. Do that on my rental property and I'll be happy to relocate you in jail. :)
Do you really advocate criminal activity?


Brad
I guess Brad is OK with the meth lab idea.

I think we need to know what he did. You want the consequences of his actions to be a logical result of his misbehavior, so he'll regret what he did. I think the sign idea is pretty good in any case. If there was a way to communicate to potentional renters why he was a bad landlord it would definitely hurt him where it counts.

Loner
03-22-2005, 06:22 PM
You should at least do some google work and find out what tenants' rigths are in your area. You may be able to get revenge and remedy your problems at the same time.
For instance, in New Jersey if your landlord refuses to fix something in your apartment you have the right to have it fixed yourself and deduct the bill from your next month's rent. Just give him a copy of the receipt along with your reduced check.

cheeznstix
03-22-2005, 08:17 PM
This group is going to want to fit the punishment to the crime. Without even a clue as to what you are suffering, you will not get useful suggestions. For all we know your "all time low" is that he wants the rent on time when the prior landlord always gave you an extra week. I'm guessing it's more than that, but until you tell us, we only have our imaginations.

Well, if you want specifics, here are just a few that my neighbors and I have experienced. To preserve annonymity (just in case my landlord ventures onto this forum), I won't point out which ones I have actually experienced.

Rats, rats, rats. Pest control supposedly comes every week, but I doubt it since the rats are still here. And we do not live in some slummy neighborhood where rats are in plenty. This is a nice suburban area.

Bees. Someone found a nest of hundreds of bees under their sink a month after move-in. Obviously the nest wasn't there upon move-in, but there was a small crack underneath the cabinet that allowed the bees to enter from the outside. When the nest was discovered (after being stung a couple times), the landlord was alerted immediately. Pest control came by. When the tenant returned back to the apartment, he/she saw from the outside of the apartment hundreds of bees crawling up and down the windows. Apparently management hires cheap pest control that has no idea what they're doing. They sprayed something and the bees went everywhere. Management's response to the tenant? Too bad. Find somewhere to stay for a couple of days. Took about a month to take care of every last bee.

The water gets shut off frequently because management doesn't pay the water bill. We pay our water bill to management on time, but management doesn't pay the city on time. End result? We get no water.

Almost all of our maintenance requests have been ignored. People have had broken dishwashers for 6 months, poor hot water pressure for 3 months, etc etc etc.

Someone ordered a $2000-3000 computer. Wasn't home when it arrived. So it was left in the leasing office. One of the people in there signed for it. Computer is missing. The person who signed for it no longer working for the complex. Management denies misplacing the computer and claims they are unable to get in touch with the former employee that signed for it. I'm not sure how this one turned out since I haven't spoken to the affected tenant since.

None of us neighbors want future residents to go through this crap. When possible, we tell people to stay away from this complex. But all of us have to live here until our lease is up. Unfortunately, we can't just pack up and leave without significant penalties (i.e. must pay rent for entire lease term). So as we bear through the last couple of months or so, we want to get back at management. Nothing illegal of course. Just some good old fashion payback.

cheeznstix
03-22-2005, 08:27 PM
You don;t necessarily need to hire an attorney - sometimes a call to the fire inspector will get them in a heap of trouble if they have code violations.

It could also land you on the street if your building gets condemned.

Ahh yes, we have played this card several times. It seemed like a great idea when we read about it on a tenant's rights website. Called the city to get them to come to the premises and cite violations. It was surprising how long this took. The time it took to set up an appointment with the city, have them send an official letter to management, the period management has to fix the problem, complaining to the city when management didn't fix the problem in their alotted time, city getting on management again, etc. took over 1 month.

2pac Shakur
03-22-2005, 08:27 PM
Most of us have probably had bad experiences with landlords. I feel like I have hit an all time low with my current landlord. I won't bore you with the details, but my current situation is completely ridiculous. Many of my neighbors at my apartment complex and I are outraged and we just want revenge. So please, all of you clever actuaries out there, how do we give management a taste of their own medicine without incurring any liabilities on ourselves? No lectures on playing nice, please. That time has come and gone. Revenge is the name of the game now. (Note: We are poor and cannot afford to hire attornies and hold management accountable for their legal responsibilities.)


Make the landlord take an actuary exam.

Uncle Gary
03-22-2005, 10:58 PM
Make the landlord take an actuary exam.:lol:

Good but I'm not sure how to make him fall for that.

No one gonna suggest Kramer's cement in the wash machine if there are any on site he owns? Ok I'll do it.

Dump some cement mix into the washing machine, turn on, get out. Don't put your clothes in at the same time.

E. Blackadder
03-23-2005, 12:39 AM
then (1)[Terms of Service #4 violation omitted by author.] their cars and/or the office and be done with it. Be sure to buy all the necessary Dual Use ;-) equipment out of state, pay cash, and wear gloves. Dispose of the gloves at least five miles away; or

(2) On a day when your rent might be expected, celebrate by going to a store and buying a fish, wrapped in standard fishwrap. Go to your office, chit-chat a bit, and give them the rent check. If it later happens that you accidently misplaced the fish in the office where it wouldn't be found for several days (ideally in a wall-crack or similar orifice, possibly the roof), then you'll just have to get another one for your rent-paying celebration.

If these ideas aren't to your taste -- and I hope they aren't -- take 'em to small claims court the day you get your deposit back. At least in some states, contracts of adhesion can be altered by a court. possibly (http://www.lawyers.com/lawyers/A~1001072~LDS/CONTRACTS.html)

Katie.
03-23-2005, 04:13 PM
If these ideas aren't to your taste -- and I hope they aren't -- take 'em to small claims court the day you get your deposit back. At least in some states, contracts of adhesion can be altered by a court. possibly (http://www.lawyers.com/lawyers/A~1001072~LDS/CONTRACTS.html)
Bet you anything this place also screws them out of their deposits. That happened to me in college. Sucked.

Griffin 9
03-23-2005, 04:14 PM
Bet you anything this place also screws them out of their deposits.The deposits were invested in lottery tickets months ago.

Double High C
03-23-2005, 04:31 PM
c-i-l-l the lan-lord!

Loner
03-23-2005, 04:45 PM
Bet you anything this place also screws them out of their deposits. That happened to me in college. Sucked.

The standard Nu Yawk City preemptive defense against this is simply not paying your last month's rent. Or so I've been told.

llcooljabe
03-23-2005, 07:34 PM
I don't know the laws about where you live. In Ontario, a landlord cannot make you sign a second 12 month lease. So after your first 12 month lease is up, all you need to do is to give 60 days notice to move out. There is no committment.

Waterloo, Ontario is a huge college town, with every joe owning a house and renting to students. Consequently almost everybody signs a 12 month lease from september to september. A friend of mine and his roommates had a terrible landlord. They took advantage of this rule, and each saved a little money and gave their notice for October 15. The landlord could not re rent the property for another year. Worked wonders.

Probably won't work for you. Other ideas I have heard of go along the lines of Loner's magazine one. Call up your local lawn care company. Most of them will come and spray your lawn, then bill you for it. I'm sure this will work for other business types too.

Sign him up for everything and anything--magazine subscriptions, web promotions--preferably something that may get his name on every telemarketers list.

Another: call your local news station and have their "Fox 5 help" crew bust him on camera.

Elisha
03-23-2005, 07:38 PM
Bet you anything this place also screws them out of their deposits. That happened to me in college. Sucked.
Isn't likelihood of getting a 100% of your deposit back (or a high percentage if you leave the place in as good or better condition) rather low in general? Out of a sample of 2, I never got what I think I should've back.

Actuary321
03-23-2005, 08:23 PM
Isn't likelihood of getting a 100% of your deposit back (or a high percentage if you leave the place in as good or better condition) rather low in general? Out of a sample of 2, I never got what I think I should've back.How hard did you challenge? Most states have fairly strict requirements about what can be charged against a deposit. In fact, in many states, rent cannot be charged against a deposit and cleaning deposits are often not legal (though many landlords use them anyway).

turpin
03-23-2005, 09:05 PM
I am not a lawyer and can not offer legal advice, but I think suing a landlord in for your deposit is an excellent idea. They should save all their receipts pertaining to the rental property for taxes anyway, so when they can't produce receipts pertaining to the deposits, that is pretty good evidence that the money wasn't spent properly.

Incredible Hulctuary
03-24-2005, 04:43 AM
None of us neighbors want future residents to go through this crap. When possible, we tell people to stay away from this complex. But all of us have to live here until our lease is up. Unfortunately, we can't just pack up and leave without significant penalties (i.e. must pay rent for entire lease term).How will the landlord force you to pay the entire remaining lease? They'd have to take you to court and given the circumstances I don't see how they'd win or how they'd even want to go to court.

Your town or state must have a rent office of some sort. Have every affected tenant register their complaints, preferably in the same day so this landlord sticks out in the office's minds. If people are too busy to call or visit the office during business hours, gather a collection of written complaints. If it goes to court the judge will ask if there were complaints. Ask them about your legally permissible options such as paying for the repairs and deducting it from your rent, or just plain withholding your rent (if that is allowed) until the landlord is brought into compliance.

The "bad landlord" sign is a good idea if everybody does it. Even if you're not supposed to do it, how will the landlord get you to take them down except by taking you to court? Like I said before, they won't want to go to court.

How many of you are in the building or complex? If you all join together you probably could afford an attorney; you shouldn't need to hire attorneys individually. The court case probably wouldn't be more than 10-15 hours (of course, ask your attorney for an idea of how long these cases usually run for), and you may even be able to sue to recover the legal fees. The mere threat of a lawsuit from the lawyer may be sufficient.

Traci
03-24-2005, 11:05 AM
I agree with Hulcuary.

The lawn service thing - and other ideas like that - only hurt the people providing the service -- the landlord isn't going to end up paying for service he didn't order -- so you've just screwed a completely innocent party out of goods/services.

Bad for your karma ...

HangerAngler
03-24-2005, 11:43 AM
If you are planning to withold rent, then prepare to have the landlord file a Landlord/Tenant suit against you. If you are withholding for what you think is a valid reason, then [at least in my county], you are required to go to the Prothonotary's office and place the withheld amount in escrow there.

One thing that is legal in Pennsylvania (check the Landlord-Tenant Act in your own state) with regards to repairs that the landlord neglects: if the tenant has notified the landlord of a repair required to make the place habitable, and the landlord takes a long time without responding, then the tenant can simply call an appropriate repair person and have the bill sent to the landlord. I know a property manager who rented to someone whose garage door opener wasn't functioning. For some reason, the management company didn't fix it for a little while, and the tenant called an electrician. The electrician charged a $100 trip fee, ~$200 diagnostic fee, and another $200-some-odd dollars, and all they wound up doing was replacing the button. State law dictated that the management company had to pay that bill.
This kind of action should apply to that bee situation.

W.r.t. security deposits: in Pennsylvania (against, do your state-specific research), if the tenant has provided (in writing) a forwarding address to the landlord prior to moving out, then the landlord must sent them their remaining deposit and an itemized list of deducted repairs within 30 days. If landlord does not send within 30 days, then the tenant can file a landlord/tenant suit and get DOUBLE DAMAGES. So if he wrongfully withholds your deposit (of say, $650) past those 30 days, then you can file suit and get $1300.

I don't recommend doing anything that damages the property. Odds are that your lease has clauses concerning the condition of the property when you arrive and when you leave. If the landlord gets a pest inspector to track the cause of any infestation back to your apartment, especially to places that could only have been reached via malicious tampering, then you are going to face a landlord/tenant suit. He will likely win that one. Then there will be a judgement against you, which will show up on your credit report.

Brad Gile
03-24-2005, 11:50 AM
I don't recommend doing anything that damages the property. Odds are that your lease has clauses concerning the condition of the property when you arrive and when you leave. If the landlord gets a pest inspector to track the cause of any infestation back to your apartment, especially to places that could only have been reached via malicious tampering, then you are going to face a landlord/tenant suit. He will likely win that one. Then there will be a judgement against you, which will show up on your credit report.

Well, in Pennsylvania, there are possible criminal penalties as well:
http://members.aol.com/StatutesPA/18.Cp.33.html


Brad

Griffin 9
03-24-2005, 11:53 AM
Cross him off your Christmas card list, but don't tell him. That way, he'll send you a card next Cristmas but won't get one in return.

Actuary321
03-24-2005, 12:17 PM
How will the landlord force you to pay the entire remaining lease? They'd have to take you to court and given the circumstances I don't see how they'd win or how they'd even want to go to court.I had an interesting situation wrt this. I moved out of state and left in the middle of the lease. I left at the beginning of a month and had paid rent for that month. I left the deposit and asked the manager to use that for any portion of the next month's rent until he was able to rent the apartment. We bought a house when we moved.

The next time we moved, again out of that state, we went to buy a house in the new town and found that we had an unpaid debt to the landlord for the balance of the lease (about 6 months). I was quite upset and called a lawyer friend. He gave me some advice about things that I could do. He was the one that told me a security deposit can only be used for damage to the unit, not for cleaning or rent. I talked it over with the landlord and he did some research (it had been over 2 years since we moved out) and found that he had rerented the unit about 10 days after the rent money we had left ran out. He agreed to clear that off my credit report. Had the unit been more difficult to rent I could have had a serious problem getting into the next house because the landlord wanted the full amount to wipe out the bad credit report.

Katie.
03-24-2005, 12:48 PM
I didn't fight not getting my deposit back before because it was out of state...the amount it would cost me to go to court there would not have been worth it. I'm sure they count on things like that. Oh well, I sort of think you have to expect to lose your security deposit. At this last place, my deposit was only $100 (I couldn't believe it) and they refunded some of it (I owed about 3 months on the water bill that they stopped sending me so they took that out of the deposit). It was a pleasure doing business with an ethical company like that.

turpin
03-24-2005, 07:59 PM
Ask your landlord where he lives so that you can deliver payment in person directly. Now you know where he lives, the better for taking revenge in ways that affect him directly.:dsmile:

Checkin' Answers
03-25-2005, 09:57 AM
Do what I did in college. Find some really poor-quality future tenants, then recommend them highly to your landlord. Untold grief for him, no problems for you.

Brad Gile
03-25-2005, 10:10 AM
Do what I did in college. Find some really poor-quality future tenants, then recommend them highly to your landlord. Untold grief for him, no problems for you.

A decent screening procedure will probably prevent any such grief.

Brad

Griffin 9
03-25-2005, 10:14 AM
A decent screening procedure will probably prevent any such grief.A guy who doesn't want to spend money on repairs probably doesn't spend a lot of money screening prospective tenants.

krank
03-25-2005, 10:20 AM
Most of us have probably had bad experiences with landlords. I feel like I have hit an all time low with my current landlord. I won't bore you with the details, but my current situation is completely ridiculous. Many of my neighbors at my apartment complex and I are outraged and we just want revenge. So please, all of you clever actuaries out there, how do we give management a taste of their own medicine without incurring any liabilities on ourselves? No lectures on playing nice, please. That time has come and gone. Revenge is the name of the game now. (Note: We are poor and cannot afford to hire attornies and hold management accountable for their legal responsibilities.)

Have one of you neighbors throw a hammer party

turpin
03-25-2005, 12:06 PM
Have one of you neighbors throw a hammer party
No, no, no. You have to take the ball out of your court, and put it into his. Have one of his neighbors through a hammer party.

Your landlord is an ordinary person, not just a landlord. Stop thinking of how to take revenge on the landlord, and start thinking about how to take revenge on the ordinary person.
:evil2::bat: :dsmile: :burn:

micaelagb
03-25-2005, 12:16 PM
W.r.t. security deposits: in Pennsylvania (against, do your state-specific research), if the tenant has provided (in writing) a forwarding address to the landlord prior to moving out, then the landlord must sent them their remaining deposit and an itemized list of deducted repairs within 30 days. If landlord does not send within 30 days, then the tenant can file a landlord/tenant suit and get DOUBLE DAMAGES. So if he wrongfully withholds your deposit (of say, $650) past those 30 days, then you can file suit and get $1300.Good luck on that. NJ has the same thing, but you have to prove that you left the house in good condition. I cleaned our house until it was spotless, and still got hit with a $400 cleaning "fee". She repainted all the rooms for $900 (she hadn't painted the house before we moved in and said we could repainte it however we liked. The original paint condition was atrocious--the kitchen hadn't been painted since the '80's, the kid's room had sticker marks all over it, and there was a white line rubbed in the blue paint in the den where her sectional sofa rubbed through the paint), replaced a sink for $1000 (it had paint in it--a $5 can of paint stripper would have taken off any dried paint, if any). More for re-asphalting the driveway (it was in great shape), replacing the carpets (it was at least 10 years old when we moved in), put in a custom pink toilet that we had replaced out of our own pocket with a white one because her original pink toilet sprung a leak (it broke on a weekend and we had to fix it because she wouldn't return our calls--sent her a bill and she never paid us back). Sent us a $2000 bill IN ADDITION to the security deposit ($1950) after we moved out. That certainly didn't get paid--I disputed the whole thing and demanded back the security deposit.

Basically, I was told that if I didn't have pictures of the original condition of the house (she didn't clean anything before we moved in--in fact, she was still loading her stuff on a moving van as our movers were unloading stuff) and pictures of how I left the house, then I couldn't prove anything. Thank goodness I own my house now--but I've advised my sister (who's in college and renting) to take pictures of everything when you move in, and again when you move out. And get witnesses both times, too. That's what the NJ renter's protection website tells you to do.

Checkin' Answers
03-25-2005, 05:06 PM
A guy who doesn't want to spend money on repairs probably doesn't spend a lot of money screening prospective tenants.

Bingo! My old landlord only rented to males, since they would either ignore repair issues or fix things themselves. He also refused to advertise, since that might cause "darkies" to show up looking for a place to live. So, he relied on current tenants to find people for the next year.

We paid him back by setting him up with a set of guys who had been booted out of their last 2 places for non-payment of rent and excessive police noise complaints. And, we got $100 off our last month's rent!

Griffin 9
03-25-2005, 05:09 PM
He also refused to advertise, since that might cause "darkies" to show up looking for a place to live.There you go - send some litigious "darkies" over to rent from this guy.

Lucy
03-25-2005, 07:00 PM
I don't like any of the property-destruction ideas (like sugar in the walls) not only because you might get in trouble, but mostly because the party who'll be injured is the next tenant. Landlord didn't clear out the rats, why would landlord clear out the ants?

If you can arrange to have everyone leave at the same time, that would hurt the landlord. Or if there are lots of units, get as many as possible to leave, and have the rest post "terrible landlord" signs in their windows.

(And find out if you can force him to pay for maintance you need to do.)