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-   -   Best way to learn VBA. (http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actuarial_discussion_forum/showthread.php?t=88423)

Guest 05-18-2007 02:43 PM

I just ordered an online ebook on VBA for Access.
- You also download files to work examples with from the site.


The 'programming' aspect is starting to actually make sense.

Automating a simple task: VBA recorder.
Learning to 'program' (with objects / methods / etc.): Book (with example files and walk throughs)
Reference: Help
Help on programming issues: Internet (MrExcel.com)

spencerhs5 05-24-2007 10:47 PM

I was wondering, on average, what VBA skills are needed in the profession. I basicly know C programming (although its been awhile and im verrry rusty). Is the VBA needed mostly for coding in excels VBA macro, is there much (if any) using the graphical code building function of VBA... and would there really be much of a reason to try and learn other things in Visual Studio i.e. SQL or C#?...

Griffin 6 05-25-2007 06:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by atomic (Post 1880335)
Is it because Excel is used by non-actuarial sectors to visually organize and manipulate data?

You will find that this is just as important as a program's ability to handle data. After all, the Actuarial Department is not a separate company.

concactu 05-28-2007 02:27 PM

i want to learn VB this summer. all this terminology thats being tossed around this thread is foreign to me.
any advice on where i should start. I'm pretty good at excel and vaguely familar with access but i'd like to be fluent in VB programming.

spencerhs5 05-28-2007 05:37 PM

im using a copy of excel 2007 vba for dummies, its pretty easy to understand and mildly entertaining although if you dont have 2007 you would wont the appropriate manual. he explicitly states that in the first chapter

Brad Gile 05-28-2007 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by concactu (Post 2121607)
i want to learn VB this summer. all this terminology thats being tossed around this thread is foreign to me.
any advice on where i should start. I'm pretty good at excel and vaguely familar with access but i'd like to be fluent in VB programming.

Start with post #1 in this thread (which is aptly titled, "Best way to learn VBA")!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bama gambler
I'll rank my choices.

1. Good book. Any of the VBA books by Walkebach will do. This will help you write clean, readable code.

2. VBA Help files. Type what you want to do in help. They have some good examples.

3. Internet. Google it or post your question on a discussion board.

Avoid the macro recorder until you have honed your skills. It writes sloppy code and there is no macro recorder in Access.

These are all tools. The best way to learn any programming language is to practice writing code using good tools. Experiment and enjoy it.

Brad

Saskatchewary 05-28-2007 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spencerhs5 (Post 2121660)
im using a copy of excel 2007 vba for dummies, its pretty easy to understand and mildly entertaining although if you dont have 2007 you would wont the appropriate manual. he explicitly states that in the first chapter

I have the same book (while using Excel 2003 :oops: ) and I find it very helpful. One downside is that I find I'm still spending a lot of time on the internets looking for help (mostly on syntax for functions not mentioned in the book). Maybe it's time I progress past the :qunq: dummy :qunq: stage of VBA literature. But I still second the recommendation. It's a great book even if you're not using Excel 2007.

spencerhs5 05-28-2007 06:30 PM

yup its a great book, and i foresee most actuaries using 2007 very soon due to the major advancements in it. We now have the ability to use 1 million rows and 16 thousand columns! along with a bunch of other useful new features.

Griffin 6 05-29-2007 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spencerhs5 (Post 2121687)
yup its a great book, and i foresee most actuaries using 2007 very soon due to the major advancements in it.

Is 2010 very soon?

JMO 05-29-2007 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Griffin 6 (Post 2121867)
Is 2010 very soon?

That depends. Do you mean Earth-soon or Mars-soon?


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