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-   -   Entry Level Field Change (http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actuarial_discussion_forum/showthread.php?t=324193)

Joker25 07-17-2017 11:44 AM

Entry Level Field Change
 
Here's my situation:

I recently, about a month and a half ago, started my first job out of college at a Retirement Consulting firm. I quickly realized that this is not the direction I want my career to go in. The culture is good and I don't mind the hours but the issue I'm having is that the work is simply underwhelming. Turns out that I'm not interested in pension. Essentially what it boils down to is the fact that I would not want to do my boss' job. This has me thinking that I'm wasting my time in an entry level position where I have no interest in progressing. I interned in life insurance and found that to be much more interesting, at the very least more analytical. In the end, I would like to get out of pension and back into life.

My question is this, should I try to cut my losses and apply for jobs in life now or should I adhere to the philosophy that you should stay in your first job for a year. My concern is that if I leave now I will appear as a job hopper or lacking commitment but if I stay for too long I might become over qualified for an entry level position in life.

In summary, should I be more concerned about finding an entry level position in the field I want to end up in or about making sure my resume looks good for when I want to make that switch.

Colonel Smoothie 07-17-2017 11:48 AM

Apply as soon as possible. Nobody I know who left pensions for another field regrets that they did it too soon.

ALivelySedative 07-17-2017 02:34 PM

Move now. Be able to state to your potential future employer why the move would be beneficial to you both, not just to you.

Joker25 07-17-2017 03:13 PM

Follow up question. If I do end up applying, should I put my current job with less than two months time on my resume?

JMO 07-17-2017 03:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joker25 (Post 9032329)
Follow up question. If I do end up applying, should I put my current job with less than two months time on my resume?

Yes. And don't quit that job (not even mentally) until you get an offer in hand. This may take a while.

TypeIIIError 07-17-2017 04:24 PM

I was on the P&C side and started looking for jobs within six months for personal reasons. Every interview I had asked me why I was looking to switch so early on into my first job. I had an answer ready and still got an offer from every company.

Think it only becomes a red flag if you have a history of it (>=2 times).

hjacjswo 07-17-2017 04:32 PM

To be fair, a lot of the work at entry level can be underwhelming. In interviews, I would just be straight up and say that you want to get out of pension due to the future of the industry.

Westley 07-17-2017 04:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joker25 (Post 9031932)
...
I quickly realized that this is not the direction I want my career to go in.
...
Essentially what it boils down to is the fact that I would not want to do my boss' job.
...
I interned in life insurance and found that to be much more interesting, at the very least more analytical.

A few thoughts:

Agree with comments above, leave asap. That's best for you, best for your current employer (assuming you'll eventually leave, the sooner you do the sooner they can look for their next person), best for your next employer. And def agree w/ JMO.

"I would not want to do my boss's job" - congrats on thinking the correct way about the career path IMO. If that's how you feel, then get out now.

A little weird that you interned in life and ended up in a field you didn't like. Think about that for a bit - how did you miss the issue that this wouldn't be interesting for you - you had an internship that in hindsight you liked (are you sure this isn't just a "grass is greener" phenomenon?) and either didn't get an offer (which is a sign of a particular problem) or you got an offer and decided to reject that in favor of going into a field that is pretty known as being undesirable (a different problem). So, worth considering a bit about how that happened to ensure that history doesn't repeat itself. If you accept a bad choice now, it will get a lot harder to make the next switch.

And, recommend that if you turned down the life offer from your internship, consider calling them and just saying that you made a mistake and want to know if there's an opening. Might feel like swallowing your pride, but as long as you handled it professionally, they probably won't feel that way.

lllj 07-18-2017 07:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Westley (Post 9032486)
either didn't get an offer (which is a sign of a particular problem)

Not all companies hire their interns into full time roles regularly. Have worked places with great interns who helped a lot over the summer but there was no budget for full time hires. I don't think it's a fair assumption that there was some problem if he didn't get hired.

Or maybe they did hire but had 10 interns and 1 spot and he was second best - also not uncommon.


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