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-   -   Leaving school off resume (http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actuarial_discussion_forum/showthread.php?t=344398)

Kenny 10-18-2019 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NormalDan (Post 9733871)
:
I'm definitely pro-1 page. The point of the resume is to get to a longer conversation, so in my view the 1 page is the top page of information about me. If you have 2 pages of information then that first page must be incredible and they'll hear all about the second page in the interview.

:iatp:

I don't list my "experience" by job, I have a section for experience that highlights projects and/or experience that are relevant to the position. Work history is a completely different section and it is literally just names of companies and dates of employment.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Westley (Post 9733870)
Yeah, don't have an education "section", just list it someplace. I have two degrees and they take two lines. FCAS and MAAA are a third line. They're at the top of the resume, with no special formatting or section breaks, before you get to the meat of the resume.

I have an education and professional designations section that includes my degrees and letters, usually in reverse chronological order so the degrees are at the bottom of the list.

urysohn 10-18-2019 12:15 PM

The one-page rule is obsolete after 5 or 6 years of experience. Just don't feel pressured to fill up that entire second page with random prattling and all will be good.

BruteForce 10-18-2019 01:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Woodrow (Post 9733854)
I stopped following the one page rule a while ago.

I assume nobody will look past the first page, so I put the stuff I want them to see on there, but my full resume is 2 or 3 pages long.

Quote:

Originally Posted by NerdAlert (Post 9733858)
Oh yeah, I missed this bit the first time. I think the one page rule is completely bogus. My resume is 2 pages. Make it as long as it needs to be.

I agree with the part about putting the stuff you want them to see on the front. The second page is for less relevant previous jobs, education, volunteerism, and "other" experience. I will say, though, that I know people are reading that page because I always get asked about my secondment, and that's in the bottom half of the second page.

Quote:

Originally Posted by urysohn (Post 9733894)
The one-page rule is obsolete after 5 or 6 years of experience. Just don't feel pressured to fill up that entire second page with random prattling and all will be good.

I agree that it's fine to have a resume longer than one page, as long as you have enough actuarial experience to back it up. EL's should stick to the one page rule.

General Apathy 10-18-2019 01:18 PM

I would leave it on if just for the off chance it starts a conversation. I actually still have my high school because it is a unique one.

ao fan 10-18-2019 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucy (Post 9733863)
20%??? Put it on one line, at the bottom.

I'd wonder if you left it off. I might wonder legal things, like whether you have a degree, and I might wonder illegal things, like whether you are trying to disguise the fact that you are an 86 year old career changer.

A woman in another industry told me that in her field, it's becoming common to only list the last 10 years or so of your experience. If that were the case, you could, of course, leave off the education. But we are a conservative industry and that would be weird here.

I haven't looked for a job in ages, but I approve of the only listing the last 10 years or so. how the heck am I supposed to even remember in detail a job I had left almost 14 years ago? I could see listing it just as a company name and title for completeness, but describing what you did there seems so old.

Colonel Smoothie 10-18-2019 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ao fan (Post 9733975)
I haven't looked for a job in ages, but I approve of the only listing the last 10 years or so. how the heck am I supposed to even remember in detail a job I had left almost 14 years ago? I could see listing it just as a company name and title for completeness, but describing what you did there seems so old.

Yeah you know what, I might even forget what school I attended...eventually...

Vorian Atreides 10-18-2019 02:49 PM

As I see it, you should be ready to talk at depth about anything you put on your resume (regardless of length).

If something like school is left off, it might be brought up in an interview; so you should be ready to talk about it to some extent (perhaps not to the same extent as things on your resume).

But things I can see someone would be interested in is major (possibly minors if interesting) and school type (public, private, big name, online-only presence, etc.)

Lucy 10-18-2019 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ao fan (Post 9733975)
I haven't looked for a job in ages, but I approve of the only listing the last 10 years or so. how the heck am I supposed to even remember in detail a job I had left almost 14 years ago? I could see listing it just as a company name and title for completeness, but describing what you did there seems so old.

I recently changed jobs and stuff I did 20 years ago suddenly became relevant. And it turned out that with a little brushing up, I was still pretty knowledgeable in that area.

But everyone's situation is different. I certainly agree that you shouldn't put anything on your resume that you aren't prepared to discuss.

Climbing Bum 12-20-2019 08:13 AM

I disagree with the "It's ok to have two pages comments". It looks so much cleaner to just have it on one page, and you'll be lucky if most Execs read two pages anyway. Anyone doing true due diligence will read your LinkedIn so the extra info is still available.

@CS I think it's worth a line at the bottom, and don't think you need more than that. I do realize that's 3 lines of wasted space, possibly 4 if you have 2 degrees. If you have a masters in something relevant you could just put that and drop the bachelors. If it's a dual major it can still go on one line.


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