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-   -   What can this career-changer do to be a more attractive hire? (Resume advice) (http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actuarial_discussion_forum/showthread.php?t=211800)

mindthegap 02-18-2011 06:32 PM

What can this career-changer do to be a more attractive hire? (Resume advice)
 
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I realize that I have some factors working against me: I have a Master's degree in an unrelated field and my work experience is not in a business environment.

But I have some things that I feel would be attractive to an employer. Excellent GPA, 2 exams (got a 10 on 1/P), SAT 790 Math/780 Verbal (back when it was only out of 1600), and GRE 800 Math/720 Verbal. I also am an independent worker and BELOVED at my job. Both my current positions require good interpersonal skills.

I have tried to get both entry-level and intern positions but with no luck.

1. What things can I invest in doing/learning to make me a more attractive candidate?

2. Are there things on my resume that should be removed or re-framed? Is there something on here that is scaring employers?

Thank you all for your wisdom and willingness to help.

herrMrtn 02-18-2011 08:44 PM

The usual advice:

1) Drop Word and PowerPoint, or at least put them after Excel and Access.
2) Inconsequential job descriptions should be dropped. Talk about your accomplishments on the job. Your potential employer can probably infer that you graded homework while working as a math teaching intern.
3) More white space. The value of words is overrated. A sparsely spaced résumé containing noteworthy information is better than a dense one packed full of fluff.

JohnLocke 02-18-2011 08:47 PM

Do a lot of crunches...make sure you dress nice...perfume/cologne is appreciated...don't underestimate the importance of make-up...if you have it, flaunt it

Guest 02-18-2011 10:21 PM

Here is the big issue:

If you are restricting yourself to CAS you are already losing about 80% (made up number) of positions. I hope that isn't the case, otherwise you have no right to complain...

Guest 02-18-2011 10:22 PM

Oh and just to get it out of the way early:

PODUNK

Sommelier 02-18-2011 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mindthegap (Post 5040073)
But I have some things that I feel would be attractive to an employer. Excellent GPA, 2 exams (got a 10 on 1/P), SAT 790 Math/780 Verbal (back when it was only out of 1600), and GRE 800 Math/720 Verbal. I also am an independent worker and BELOVED at my job. Both my current positions require good interpersonal skills.

I have tried to get both entry-level and intern positions but with no luck.

1. Don't restrict yourself to P&C.
2. Don't restrict yourself geographically.
3. Don't ever tell an interviewer that you are BELOVED at your current job. I rolled my eyes about as high as they could go when I read that.
4. Your resume reads like a list of things that you've done. Great. How have you added value to the places you've worked? What have you accomplished?
5. Pass another exam - with a weak resume in an unrelated field, you're probably going to need more than two exams.
6. What is a class marshal? (Unless I'm misreading, it seems like a typo.)

Colonel Smoothie 02-19-2011 12:31 AM

Macros are a good skill to have, but it is better to state what kind of macros you have written and what you have used them for. The scope of macros is huge, and they can be used for anything from pulling pranks to serious work, to removing entire corporate divisions through automation. So, simply stating that you can write them won't give the employer very much information about yourself over the other candidates.

Instead, maybe remove some of the irrelevant jobs you've had and devote a section to the types of computer projects you've accomplished. Also, I'm assuming you use VBA unless you're working with a dinosaur version of Excel, so you might as well put that on your resume as it will more easily catch HR's eye while they quickly glance at your resume - it's a lot easier to see VBA while skimming than a parenthesized phrase like (macro).

mindthegap 02-19-2011 05:50 AM

Thanks for the tough love guys.

1. I send out slightly different versions of the the resume for SOA and CAS jobs. This is the CAS one. Is this overkill?

2. I've been told that having more than two exams is going to make me too expensive as an entry-level hire.

3. To all you jaded actuary types: It is possible to be beloved at your job. Obviously you have never spent much time in a Unitarian Universalist church. Its one big touchy-feely lovefest. And no I would never say that to an interviewer. Actuaries can't handle feelings. ;)

campbell 02-19-2011 06:36 AM

YOU CAN'T HANDLE THE TRUTH!

Oh, I guess you can.

So to respond to your latest post, more exams = better. Whoever is telling you that more than two exams will be too much is not helping you. Get as far in exams as you can.

Yes, there may be some dumbass employers who may take the attitude that more than 2 exams means a too-expensive-entry-level hire, but that is extremely short-term thinking and you probably wouldn't want to work for such an employer....they'd probably be shortchanging you all the time.

annuitize 02-19-2011 11:44 AM

Why does your resume say "Anon" after it?


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