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-   -   Done with the exam? Share your Exam 1/P study notes here! (http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actuarial_discussion_forum/showthread.php?t=92250)

Tom 09-27-2006 02:53 PM

Done with the exam? Share your Exam 1/P study notes here!
 
You can post your notes online using the upload button after clicking post reply, or you can always email them to me at tom(at)actuarialoutpost.com. If that isn't easy enough, just PM me here and I can send you my fax number or we can work something else out!


Any questions about what/how to post, can be answered here!

Thanks! :wave:

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All posts in this thread that do not have notes attached will be deleted!

Members who donate notes* will be added to a user group much like the site supporters. This group will have added privileges such as a larger avatar and a custom user title other than 'member.'

Please note that some notes may be out of date, contain information that may no longer be tested, or not cover all required information for your exam. Please check your exam syllabus for a list of required study topics for your exam, before using these notes.

Notes that have been donated have not been checked for accuracy! If you do find an error in any of the notes, please feel free to point them out to me (or the original poster) via PM and I can edit the post where they were uploaded to call the error to everyone's attention.

Please only post notes that you own or have permission to post. Please respect otherís intellectual property and only post notes that meet our copyright policy.

Thanks again,

Tom :wave:



*a respectable amount


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theteacher 11-19-2006 06:16 PM

Discrete Distributions
 
2 Attachment(s)
I typed up these tables to help me memorize the discrete distributions. I started each study session by filling in everything I could remember, then reviewing the things I didn't remember. I did the same with the continuous distributions, but I can't find the file :sad:

I found that knowing all the distributions like the back of my hand was somewhat helpful during the exam, but not nearly as helpful as having done tons of problems.

Tom 12-08-2006 12:35 PM

We had a member that did not have Microsoft Word to open theteacher's notes, so I'm posting it in Wordpad format for people that do not have access to Microsoft Office. Enjoy :tup:

:link: Discrete Distributions Wordpad Version.rtf

Kazodev 12-08-2006 01:12 PM

In the formula for Variance of Uniform you have a mistake, the term you are subtracting should be I believe. Also, at least for me, where it says it's coming out weird, is that supposed to be ?

daaaave 12-08-2006 02:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kazodev (Post 1875637)
In the formula for Variance of Uniform you have a mistake, the term you are subtracting should be I believe. Also, at least for me, where it says it's coming out weird, is that supposed to be ?

I agree with both of these comments. Also, I don't find it useful to have a formula for the variance of random variable that is uniformly selected from an arbitrary set of n elements, but I can see it being useful to have a formula for the variance of a discrete uniform[1,n] random variable. (I don't actually know what that variance is off the top of my head, so I obviously don't find it that useful, but I do find it useful to know that the variance of a uniform[0,1] random variable is 1/12.)

Kazodev 12-08-2006 02:14 PM

In general the variance of U[a,b] is I think.

daaaave 12-08-2006 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kazodev (Post 1875799)
In general the variance of U[a,b] is I think.

In the continuous case, yes. This follows immediately from the fact that the variance of U[0,1]=1/12 and a U[a,b] is a shifted and rescaled U[0,1]. The discrete case has a correction factor and so it isn't just n^2/12.

Kazodev 12-08-2006 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by daaaave (Post 1875828)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kazodev (Post 1875799)
In general the variance of U[a,b] is I think.

In the continuous case, yes. This follows immediately from the fact that the variance of U[0,1]=1/12 and a U[a,b] is a shifted and rescaled U[0,1]. The discrete case has a correction factor and so it isn't just n^2/12.

Ah you're right, the variance for discrete is is

Nonpareil 01-24-2007 05:37 PM

You can download my notes for Exam P at: http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/down...for-Exam-P.doc

It's mostly formulas, with a few shortcuts, and some comments, based on my own experience with the exam and what I've learned from this forum.

volva yet 02-19-2007 11:57 PM

http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...d.php?t=102752


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