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  #11  
Old 03-28-2007, 10:51 AM
cincinnatikid cincinnatikid is offline
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Let me see if I understand your plan, Ace...

You intended to for a couple of years at an insurance company, pass a few exams, burn all your bridges over a couple of thousand dollars, then jump over to a consulting firm that will chew you up and spit you out in 6 months (since you will no doubt have little or nothing to contribute there).

Brilliant career move.
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  #12  
Old 03-28-2007, 10:59 AM
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ReddEye ReddEye is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cincinnatikid View Post
...burn all your bridges over a couple of thousand dollars...
Devil's Advocate: How is one burning all their bridges in this scenario?
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  #13  
Old 03-28-2007, 11:02 AM
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SamTheEagle SamTheEagle is offline
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Originally Posted by ReddEye View Post
Devil's Advocate: How is one burning all their bridges in this scenario?
Clearly, anytime you switch jobs, you're burning all of your bridges.
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  #14  
Old 03-28-2007, 11:11 AM
Ace2415 Ace2415 is offline
 
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I just wanted to clarify that this was simply a hypothetical situation, I'm just trying to get some feedback from both sides.
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  #15  
Old 03-28-2007, 11:11 AM
Westley Westley is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cincinnatikid View Post
You intended to for a couple of years at an insurance company, pass a few exams, burn all your bridges over a couple of thousand dollars, then jump over to a consulting firm that will chew you up and spit you out in 6 months (since you will no doubt have little or nothing to contribute there).
I would suggest that you should learn more about insurance companies, consulting firms, and the OP before you dispense any additional career advice.
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  #16  
Old 03-28-2007, 11:19 AM
Westley Westley is offline
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Originally Posted by Ace2415 View Post
I just wanted to clarify that this was simply a hypothetical situation, I'm just trying to get some feedback from both sides.
My advice, which is related, but not totally on point: People who do well in consulting do well because they like consulting. They enjoy the competition of presenting in front of a client and trying to convince that client that they can do better than the other firms presenting. They enjoy the challenge of digging into the data and understanding and learning and explaining something that the client doesn't see. They enjoy building relationships and networking, and they especially enjoy the position of being a trusted advisor that their client turn to for help and answers. They don't mind that the client often has unreaslistic expectations with respect to timing, they can comfortably discuss issues around budget, and they have exacting standards for quality from themselves and their cow-orkers. They realize that the price for doing a job that they enjoy might include more late nights than others, and some hectic travel (ps: business travel is not fun, especially when working as a consultant).

If you like that, I'm not sure why you wouldn't want to start on it now. If you don't like that, the consulting firms don't pay you well enough to make up for the additional hours they demand.

You describe a common path, and one that makes sense, but ime you will either wish you had gotten into consulting sooner (a mistake you can correct right now) because it's a great fit for you, or you will regret moving to consulting and go back to insurance (although if you get a big bump going to consulting, there's likely some residual benefit as you will not take a huge pay cut when you go back).

Last edited by Westley; 03-28-2007 at 11:26 AM..
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  #17  
Old 03-28-2007, 08:36 PM
DrNO811 DrNO811 is offline
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I would suggest that you should learn more about insurance companies, consulting firms, and the OP before you dispense any additional career advice.
He does have a somewhat valid point. Generally, if you leave as soon as acquiring your Fellowship after a company invested resources in training you and in paying for your exam progress, they will not hire you back unless they are desperate for the experience (or unless you are a particularly smooth talker).

As far as chewing him up is concerned...I think that depends on the speed of exam passage. If you pass all your exams and don't have three years of work experience, I think you would fail miserably in consulting (again, unless you are a particularly smooth talker). Obviously, learning curves are different for everyone, but I think that the majority of people in this profession aren't really contributing much until they have between 2 and 5 years of experience. (This is from a P+C side...I can't really speak to the learning curve of the Life/Health side.)
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  #18  
Old 03-29-2007, 01:07 AM
Dreamer Dreamer is offline
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All that fancy client talking and really getting involved w/ people that supposedly happens in consulting companies doesn't really apply to entry level does it?

I interviewed with a big four firm and after at least 5 years exp. and fellow status one becomes a "project manager" - this is where your responsibilities shift from doing purely techy things to managing other people and really starting to the fancy client work.

Why not work for an insurance company for a few years, pass some exams; get the associate's at least before transitioning?
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  #19  
Old 03-29-2007, 09:19 AM
cincinnatikid cincinnatikid is offline
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Originally Posted by DrNO811 View Post
He does have a somewhat valid point. Generally, if you leave as soon as acquiring your Fellowship after a company invested resources in training you and in paying for your exam progress, they will not hire you back unless they are desperate for the experience (or unless you are a particularly smooth talker).

As far as chewing him up is concerned...I think that depends on the speed of exam passage. If you pass all your exams and don't have three years of work experience, I think you would fail miserably in consulting (again, unless you are a particularly smooth talker). Obviously, learning curves are different for everyone, but I think that the majority of people in this profession aren't really contributing much until they have between 2 and 5 years of experience. (This is from a P+C side...I can't really speak to the learning curve of the Life/Health side.)
This was very much my point. Someone who under-performs at work to focus solely on exams and then leaves a company as soon as they complete the exams for no better reason than more money (or "I didn't really want to be here to begin with, but I thought it was an easy place to pass exams") is quite likely to be burning their bridges.

I also believe that people who focus their attentions on passing exams and miss a great deal of the actual day-to-day dealings are semi-delusional if they think they are as qualified as they may appear of paper as soon as their receive credentials. They will likely be overwhelmed and underprepared to jump to any other work environment where they will be expected to provide some working knoweldge and/or expertise, let alone a fast-paced work environment.
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  #20  
Old 03-29-2007, 09:21 AM
cincinnatikid cincinnatikid is offline
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Originally Posted by Dreamer View Post
All that fancy client talking and really getting involved w/ people that supposedly happens in consulting companies doesn't really apply to entry level does it?

I interviewed with a big four firm and after at least 5 years exp. and fellow status one becomes a "project manager" - this is where your responsibilities shift from doing purely techy things to managing other people and really starting to the fancy client work.

Why not work for an insurance company for a few years, pass some exams; get the associate's at least before transitioning?
This is a much better reasoning and career progression, imo. But I don't know anything about insurance companies, consulting firms, or you personally, so take that for what it's worth.
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