Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Cyberchat > Non-Actuarial Topics
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions

DW Simpson Global Actuarial & Analytics Recruitment
Download our Actuarial Salary Survey
now with state-by-state salary information!


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1191  
Old 10-20-2019, 07:14 PM
Lucy's Avatar
Lucy Lucy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 2,955
Default

I don't have a tray large enough to cook a spatchcocked turkey.

(Yeah, I roast birds in the oven, where I set a dial and that's the temperature. This oven is pretty accurate, especially on convention.)
Reply With Quote
  #1192  
Old 10-20-2019, 07:15 PM
Lucy's Avatar
Lucy Lucy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 2,955
Default

My largest tray might work for spatchcocked chicken. But that would be close.
Reply With Quote
  #1193  
Old 10-21-2019, 10:34 AM
crabber crabber is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 10,495
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
I don't have a tray large enough to cook a spatchcocked turkey.

(Yeah, I roast birds in the oven, where I set a dial and that's the temperature. This oven is pretty accurate, especially on convention.)
A few years back I trashed all my crappy department store trays in exchange for a stack of standard half-sheet size pans. One of those will fit a 12 lb spatchcocked turkey.
Reply With Quote
  #1194  
Old 10-21-2019, 11:46 AM
crabber crabber is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 10,495
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Egghead View Post
Spatchcock chicken is amazing. Haven't done a turkey that way, probably because I'm afraid the finished product would be too weird-looking to serve at the big meal. I know, that's dumb, because I could just cut it up and serve on a platter. But I guess I'm a traditionalist.
I've done it for a couple Thanksgivings. I can't say the improvement was so mind-bogglingly better than other methods that it's worth the comments from traditionalists (which I've received). I do think there are legitimate advantages. It cooks so much faster than a stuffed bird. Also, if you're doing it on a grill, it frees up your oven for other stuff (especially if you're doing it over a pan of stuffing dressing, then it's two items that would otherwise be competing for oven space). And because the shape is so much less awkward than a traditional roast, I find it easier and way faster to carve up into a nice-looking platter (I swear one of these years I'll remember to take a picture!). Plus more crispy skin!
Reply With Quote
  #1195  
Old 10-21-2019, 11:51 AM
Jasper07734's Avatar
Jasper07734 Jasper07734 is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,805
Default

So this thread is not about Bohemian Grove?
__________________
The revAOlution will be complete when the language is perfect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper07734 View Post
I was thinking [that the AO is] more like Pocket Pool: You think you're driving your point home hard, until you realize that you're really only busting your own balls
Quote:
Originally Posted by William F. Buckley, Jr.
Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views.
Spoiler:
Reply With Quote
  #1196  
Old 10-21-2019, 11:54 AM
Jasper07734's Avatar
Jasper07734 Jasper07734 is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,805
Default

Once in a while I dabble with attempts at indoor smoking. I know it's possible to a limited extent, but, I don't think I'm doing it right.

I have a large roasting pan with a rack that I try to set up with a tray to catch drippings so the wood chips don't get soaked. I'm having trouble getting the wood chips to actually smoke, though. I end up with good slow-roasted meat (small cuts of brisket are what I use to practice on), but like I said, it's still not smoking smoking. Is there a way to tweak the process for better results (other than getting a real smoker, which is impossible at this time because apartment)?
__________________
The revAOlution will be complete when the language is perfect.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper07734 View Post
I was thinking [that the AO is] more like Pocket Pool: You think you're driving your point home hard, until you realize that you're really only busting your own balls
Quote:
Originally Posted by William F. Buckley, Jr.
Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views.
Spoiler:
Reply With Quote
  #1197  
Old 10-21-2019, 12:06 PM
crabber crabber is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 10,495
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasper07734 View Post
Once in a while I dabble with attempts at indoor smoking. I know it's possible to a limited extent, but, I don't think I'm doing it right.

I have a large roasting pan with a rack that I try to set up with a tray to catch drippings so the wood chips don't get soaked. I'm having trouble getting the wood chips to actually smoke, though. I end up with good slow-roasted meat (small cuts of brisket are what I use to practice on), but like I said, it's still not smoking smoking. Is there a way to tweak the process for better results (other than getting a real smoker, which is impossible at this time because apartment)?
One of the cooking competition shows a few years back popularized the indoor "smoke gun" device (a quick Amazon search shows quite a few hits) but I've never tried one.
Reply With Quote
  #1198  
Old 10-21-2019, 01:49 PM
Lucy's Avatar
Lucy Lucy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 2,955
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by crabber View Post
A few years back I trashed all my crappy department store trays in exchange for a stack of standard half-sheet size pans. One of those will fit a 12 lb spatchcocked turkey.
My roasting pans are perfectly good, and I have them in sizes that fit anything from a regular chicken up to as large a bird as I'm comfortable handling. I also have three half-sheet trays, which I use for cookies and brownies, but they are shallower than what I would want for a greasy bird. The roasting pans are about 1.5" to 2" tall, the half sheet trays maybe 3/4".

Hmm, I suppose they are so large they wouldn't overflow, so maybe they'd work. Of course, I usually roast a 20 pound turkey at Thanksgiving (and I don't like turkey enough to cook it other than for Thanksgiving.)

Do you elevate the spatchcocked bird off the dripping when you cook it? With what? Also, isn't it awkward to use such a large pan to make the gravy?

(I don't usually bother with gravy, either, but for Thanksgiving, that's a requirement.)

I've considered spatchcocking a chicken, just to try it. But to be honest, my chicken usually comes out super, so I don't really feel the need to find a better method of cooking it.

(And when it doesn't, it's because I've wandered off and not paid attention to it, something that seems just as likely with another cooking method.)

I'm surprised at the comment that it's easier to carve. I'd think it would be slightly more awkward with the bird flat against the bones like that, and not elevated. But maybe I'm just used to carving a roast bird. I cheat. For the white meat, I cut horizontal slices in towards the rib cage. If the thigh is large enough to be more than one serving (true for a turkey, but usually not for a chicken) I cut it off the bird and carve it to the side. So I guess the thigh would be the same.
Reply With Quote
  #1199  
Old 10-21-2019, 02:22 PM
crabber crabber is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 10,495
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
Hmm, I suppose they are so large they wouldn't overflow, so maybe they'd work. Of course, I usually roast a 20 pound turkey at Thanksgiving (and I don't like turkey enough to cook it other than for Thanksgiving.)
I've never tried this with such a large bird, so I can't comment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
Do you elevate the spatchcocked bird off the dripping when you cook it? With what?
I have stainless steel "cooling racks" that I use to elevate meat off the bottom of the pan. Sometimes I use balled-up wads of aluminum foil to get additional height if I want to get more airflow under the meat. This trick works really well for chicken wings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
Also, isn't it awkward to use such a large pan to make the gravy?
Hmm, I can't say I've solved this other than just pouring off the drippings into a separate gravy pan. One time I placed the bird above a roasting pan of dressing there weren't pan drippings to make gravy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
I'm surprised at the comment that it's easier to carve. I'd think it would be slightly more awkward with the bird flat against the bones like that, and not elevated. But maybe I'm just used to carving a roast bird. I cheat. For the white meat, I cut horizontal slices in towards the rib cage. If the thigh is large enough to be more than one serving (true for a turkey, but usually not for a chicken) I cut it off the bird and carve it to the side. So I guess the thigh would be the same.
It's not like I've got years of experience being the host of large Thanksgiving dinners so I get that people have traditions and certain ways of doing things that work well for them. I just think trying to carve chunks of meat off a hot bowling ball shaped roast to be a really awkward endeavor. With spatchcock turkey, the roast is splayed out so carving it up is not the exercise of trying to jockey around figuring out which angle the knife should go. I can see where all the joints are and separate with one knife stroke straight into the cutting board. I'll use a carving/boning knife to separate each side of the breast from the bone, then carve up the breast with the skin still intact pretty much the same way you might do with a chicken breast.

The downsides to spatchcock turkey is that it can be awkward without the right equipment. You would want a roasting pan that's big enough and a really sturdy cooling rack, and someone with strong forearms depending on the size of the turkey. The hardest thing for me is taking out the spine. Turkey has some thick bones to cut through - you really need a very good pair of kitchen shears.

EDIT: I thought I might as well post a link to one of my favorite and most used baking pans. It's just such a darn good product. It would work well for an application like this.

Last edited by crabber; 10-21-2019 at 02:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #1200  
Old 10-21-2019, 02:49 PM
Lucy's Avatar
Lucy Lucy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 2,955
Default

I have good kitchen shears, and sharp knives. And I sometimes dismember whole birds anyway, like if I want to broil chicken pieces. I'm sure I could do it.

I have a suggestion for a pretty serving presentation -- it's what I do with my New Year's goose, which I roast whole, but then serve buffet-style to people who wander in and out of the party.

I cut off the last two joints of the wings, and the legs, and tail, and set them aside. Then I remove the large pieces of skin covering the stuffing at the neck and vent, and slice them into "serving sizes" and set those aside.

Then I remove the thighs, and set them aside.

Then I remove the large piece of breast meat on each side, in two large pieces, and slice down into serving pieces. And I take each slab of sliced breast meat, still "assembled" (like a loaf of sliced bread) and lay them on the serving platter, side by side, with the thicker (backbone) side towards the center. I place the neck end close to one end of the platter.

Then I slice off all the little bit of meat, like the top joint of the wing, and the meat around the wish bone that wasn't included with the breasts, and the bit on the bottom around the "shoulder blade" and put it between the neat breast slabs.

Then I slice the thighs, and and other parts of lower-animal meat (like the oysters) and place it below the big pieces of breast meat. I cover it with the serving pieces of skin, and place the legs and wings approximately where they were before I started cutting up the bird.

So, I end up with the bird looking sort of like it did before I started, but mostly deboned. (The wings and legs still have bones) and everything is pre-cut into easy serving-sized pieces.

The downside is that for a pretty presentation, you need to cut up the entire bird, and if you expect substantial leftovers, it's nice to have bigger uncut pieces (since it keeps better that way -- less surface area means less oxidation.) But if you plan to make curry or something with the leftovers, it's still fine.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.28597 seconds with 12 queries