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Old 03-09-2012, 08:06 PM
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nonpareilpearl nonpareilpearl is offline
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Question Question about UK actuary exams

Hello! I'm in the US and I am currently studying for the US actuary exams. I'm not sure where to post this, but I figured this would be a good place to start. I hope to move from the US to the UK, hopefully sooner rather than later, but I'm not sure how the UK actuary exams/career path differs from the US. Has anyone else here done this or have any advice/thoughts to offer? Any and all input appreciated.

(In the interest of full disclosure there are two places I'm considering moving to - the UK and Australia, so I'm posting a similar question over in the Australia/Pacific section of the board.)

Thanks!
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Old 03-12-2012, 11:38 AM
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spencerhs5 spencerhs5 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nonpareilpearl View Post
Hello! I'm in the US and I am currently studying for the US actuary exams. I'm not sure where to post this, but I figured this would be a good place to start. I hope to move from the US to the UK, hopefully sooner rather than later, but I'm not sure how the UK actuary exams/career path differs from the US. Has anyone else here done this or have any advice/thoughts to offer? Any and all input appreciated.

(In the interest of full disclosure there are two places I'm considering moving to - the UK and Australia, so I'm posting a similar question over in the Australia/Pacific section of the board.)

Thanks!
They all recognize each others credentials, but if you plan on moving sooner rather than later why not just take the exams for where you intend to live? The organisations also have a schematic for which exams get credit from the other contries.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:02 PM
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I was under the impression that it would be easier to move as a "skilled migrant" - I believe for the UK that is 3+ years (if I'm not confusing it with Australia...). I was planning to study and take exams to keep up my credentials in the US so that I could move with some experience under my belt and thus have an easier transition. Is that not the way to go?
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Old 03-13-2012, 04:14 AM
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GargoyleWaiting GargoyleWaiting is offline
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I've no direct experience in recruiting people from the US into the UK, but in general, to get all the paperwork through there is a requirement for the employer to demonstrate that they couldn't get an appropriately skilled person from within the UK. This will be much easier to do if you've been working in an actuarial role in the US. And I suspect that means you need to be doing the US exams?

In which case, I'd say go with that and keep an eye on which US exams get you the best exemptions from UK exams (http://www.actuaries.org.uk/students...emptions-exams) - if you reach fellowship while you're still in the US there's a straight mutual recognition arrangement with the UK profession.

Career paths seem pretty similar - start off with low level spreadsheet/data work and move up from there as you get expertise in the company and exams.
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Old 03-16-2012, 09:59 AM
MetsMan MetsMan is offline
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You can continue to pursue the US credentials. I have known students in the UK who had moved there (from Asia) and were sticking with the US based exams.

Though unless you have a passport from an EEA country, it will be difficult to get a work visa for the UK without having a company sponsor you. In the past year the UK Visa program has changed, and some prior avenues for 'skilled workers' have been closed.
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