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  #21  
Old 01-21-2019, 05:50 PM
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I feel like you're in the wrong profession if you lack one of the key attributes that it takes to make it in a field. For most actuaries that enjoy their job, detail oriented comes naturally. As with any profession, the skill that makes you good at your job should come naturally to you in order for you to enjoy it. Otherwise you're just coaching yourself to like your job which isn't ideal.
This doesn't really apply to EL. Have yet to meet the EL person who was not flummoxed by the complexity of the workbooks they first see. Its quite normal. With training and experience, that complexity becomes routine.

It's when they still have issues with the complexity after a few years that you should worry.
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Old 01-21-2019, 09:07 PM
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One thing you can do is ask others what they would do to check. I donít mean ask them to check it for you. But ask them to you in a sentence or two what they would check. Also how long they would spend.

Another thing- you have to figure out a way to check it that doesnít completely bore you.

This is a normal part of learning to do analytical work. Normally somebody either makes too many mistakes, or is too careful and therefore too slow. It takes a while to learn the balance. You will get there.
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  #23  
Old 01-21-2019, 09:08 PM
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My manager told me that I should go compete in an excel competition. Have any of y'all ever heard of such tournaments?
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  #24  
Old 01-22-2019, 06:06 AM
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yeah man, the problem is that I do my work way too fast. I'm fast in excel and that might be another problem.

My manager told me that I should go compete in an excel competition. Have any of y'all ever heard of such tournaments?

And do you any of you compete?
https://www.modeloff.com/

Yes, being too rapid in Excel can be a problem, because you decide you can fix problems rapidly, rather than setting things up so that they're more reliable to begin with (which takes more time and thought).
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Old 01-22-2019, 07:08 AM
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Don't check your work by looking at your code. Whenever possible, check your work by independently calculating the right answer, and checking that your formula produces that. Do that as you work, not a day later. (The explaining thing is good a day later ) But I find it enormously more efficient to get it right the first time than to check my work.

If your complicated index thing gives you the right answer in the first two rows, you can probably just copy it down the column.
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  #26  
Old 01-22-2019, 07:13 AM
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lol you really think I have control over this?
It depends on the project. If you have a whole project, you might be able to say, "hey, I think i could do this faster and more reliably if I coded it in R instead updating this suite of spreadsheets." If your office uses R, and is the deadline isn't so tight that your failure to port it will be disastrous, your boss may let you try that. And you could look really good if you succeed.

On the other hand, if you are asked to update one spreadsheet in a suite of related spreadsheets... Yeah, you better update the spreadsheet.
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Old 01-22-2019, 09:39 AM
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What's the safest way to go skiing?

Don't ski.
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  #28  
Old 01-22-2019, 09:40 AM
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IME: I'm very Type B and more interested in the theory and soundness of a method rather than particular parameters or results. So I go find a glorified spreadsheet checker type another actuary to look for little typos.
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  #29  
Old 01-22-2019, 09:46 AM
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IME: I'm very Type B and more interested in the theory and soundness of a method rather than particular parameters or results. So I go find a glorified spreadsheet checker type another actuary to look for little typos.
Do everyone a favor and try to get the spreadsheet project assigned to the detail-oriented person to begin with. Proofreading a sloppy spreadsheet is an awful task.
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  #30  
Old 01-22-2019, 09:48 AM
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I disagree with this. A skill that I admire in some of my teammates is their big picture view, strategic thinking, and innovative ideas. They don't sweat the details but just check for overall reasonability. In fact, my managers have rarely checked or asked for the details of my code or spreadsheets.
You misunderstood, I'm talking the details of a final report or something, not necessarily every line of code in some macro. And this thread is about detail oriented, not other attributes. Obviously, those are other important attributes of an actuary.
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