Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Exams - Please Limit Discussion to Exam-Related Topics > SoA/CAS Preliminary Exams > Long-Term Actuarial Math
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions

Salary Surveys
Property & Casualty, Life, Health & Pension

Health Actuary Jobs
Insurance & Consulting jobs for Students, Associates & Fellows

Actuarial Recruitment
Visit DW Simpson's website for more info.
www.dwsimpson.com/about

Casualty Jobs
Property & Casualty jobs for Students, Associates & Fellows


Long-Term Actuarial Math Old Exam MLC Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-06-2017, 01:00 PM
Sir Issac's Avatar
Sir Issac Sir Issac is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 412
Default For WA, is it okay to set variables equal to specific answers to reference them later

For example, if I need to calculate 5V

Can I write: 5V = Ax+5 - Pax+5

then say Ax+5 = 0.243568 = x

P = 0.004236 = y

ax+5 = 12.32456 = z

then 5V = x - y * z

then whenever I have to use any of those in subsequent parts for this question, I can just reference the variables I defined.

Do you think that would be okay strategy to use?

Some of the numbers on the WA have so many decimals and I don't want to keep re writing them
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-06-2017, 02:19 PM
TCUMath TCUMath is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: DFW
Studying for MFE
College: Alum
Posts: 91
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Issac View Post
For example, if I need to calculate 5V

Can I write: 5V = Ax+5 - Pax+5

then say Ax+5 = 0.243568 = x

P = 0.004236 = y

ax+5 = 12.32456 = z

then 5V = x - y * z

then whenever I have to use any of those in subsequent parts for this question, I can just reference the variables I defined.

Do you think that would be okay strategy to use?

Some of the numbers on the WA have so many decimals and I don't want to keep re writing them
I think this would be okay if you're explicit in your approach. I could be wrong though
__________________
P/FM/C/MLC - VEE
MFE - FAP - APC
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-06-2017, 02:35 PM
wat?'s Avatar
wat? wat? is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hi
Studying for beer
Favorite beer: Fresh Squeezed IPA
Posts: 33,260
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Issac View Post
For example, if I need to calculate 5V

Can I write: 5V = Ax+5 - Pax+5

then say Ax+5 = 0.243568 = x

P = 0.004236 = y

ax+5 = 12.32456 = z

then 5V = x - y * z

then whenever I have to use any of those in subsequent parts for this question, I can just reference the variables I defined.

Do you think that would be okay strategy to use?

Some of the numbers on the WA have so many decimals and I don't want to keep re writing them
Conceptually, it's a good idea, but if you're going to do this, I'd advise against using "x", "y" or "n" - those appear too often in the general notation of the exam that it may be difficult for the grader to ascertain exactly what you're trying to do.
__________________
"Mathematical Induction: How mathematicians manage to suck all the fun out of lining up a row of dominos, knocking the one on the end down, and watching the entire row fall." -BC
Skip it. - AG

AO Golfers Unite! Here and here.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-10-2017, 10:10 AM
Jdevil's Avatar
Jdevil Jdevil is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Studying for GHCORC
College: Université Laval
Posts: 113
Default

I could see the point if you had a complex expression without a specific symbol associated to separate from your equation, but why would you do this in your example? What is the point of saying P = y and use y when you can just use P?
__________________
ASA, ACIA
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-10-2017, 06:00 PM
Sir Issac's Avatar
Sir Issac Sir Issac is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 412
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdevil View Post
I could see the point if you had a complex expression without a specific symbol associated to separate from your equation, but why would you do this in your example? What is the point of saying P = y and use y when you can just use P?
I kind of meant it the way you described it
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.33741 seconds with 11 queries