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Long-Term Actuarial Math Old Exam MLC Forum

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  #1  
Old 04-22-2019, 10:15 AM
anothermathteacher anothermathteacher is offline
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Default Grading, WA questions

I assume that this has been posted or talked about before, but I cannot find much from SOA regarding their grading of WA questions. I see some general advice, but it seems more relevant to FSA exams.

Does anyone have insights into how grading is done? For instance, if I am unable to calculate a value in part a) that's used in part b), and I know how to calculate part b), given part a), could I simply set answer to a) equal to "x" and show my work for b)?

If all work in b) is correct but I am unable to get a final answer due to inability to calculate value in part a), would I still receive full credit?
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Old 04-22-2019, 04:45 PM
SweepingRocks SweepingRocks is offline
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I believe so, as the SOA does have a policy where they do not deduct points from more than one question if you make the same error. i.e., if you calculate a value in A wrong and use it to calculate the answer to B using the correct methodology, you will lose points for A, but not B. Perhaps someone else could provide more insight, but this is how I understand it.
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Old 04-22-2019, 05:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anothermathteacher View Post
I assume that this has been posted or talked about before, but I cannot find much from SOA regarding their grading of WA questions. I see some general advice, but it seems more relevant to FSA exams.

Does anyone have insights into how grading is done? For instance, if I am unable to calculate a value in part a) that's used in part b), and I know how to calculate part b), given part a), could I simply set answer to a) equal to "x" and show my work for b)?

If all work in b) is correct but I am unable to get a final answer due to inability to calculate value in part a), would I still receive full credit?
Full marks? Not from me. Part marks? If you showed me a starting formula with variables and stuff, sure!!!!
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Old 04-22-2019, 05:28 PM
anothermathteacher anothermathteacher is offline
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Full marks on part b would be a better way to phrase what I'm asking.
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Old 04-22-2019, 05:34 PM
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So you've input a parameter "x" that is incorrect and likely not plausible, yet you expect full credit???

What I tell all the students I ever run across: "It's not the final answer that gets you the bulk of the marks: it's all the steps that led you to that answer."
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Last edited by Breadmaker; 04-22-2019 at 05:39 PM.. Reason: Breddie's Pearl of Wisdom
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Old 04-22-2019, 05:45 PM
SweepingRocks SweepingRocks is offline
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So you've input a parameter "x" that is incorrect and likely not plausible, yet you expect full credit???

What I tell all the students I ever run across: "It's not the final answer that gets you the bulk of the marks: it's all the steps that led you to that answer."
Right. But the multiple part questions where part a is 2 points and b is 2 points, if I don't know how to do a, but I know b and I can show work showing how to do it, would I get 2 points for b since I used all steps in part b? I think we all know we're not getting points for A if we do that, but that was never the question.

Also, your quote makes no sense in the context you're using. If he shows all his steps for B, then by your quote, he should get full credit. But your "???" implies otherwise. This isn't an etiquette website, but I think you should refrain from quoting yourself. It sounds pompous.
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Old 04-22-2019, 11:16 PM
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^I apologize for the bluntness of my response. I've been on both sides of the exam fence, both of which have taught me some rough lessons.

I refer you to the "Guide for SOA Written Exams". Section 6.3 Do's has a bullet which covers the situation above ("Understand that partial credit is available at most all steps..."). There is also some good info to be gleaned from other parts.

[url="https://www.soa.org/files/edu/edu-guide-to-written-exams.pdf"]
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Old 04-23-2019, 01:47 AM
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Not sure if Breadmaker is answering the same question but OP is correct. If you get some answer for (a), you should use it when answering (b).

If you show all your work/formulas for part (b) and the answer is consistent with the answer from (a) then (b) will be awarded full marks, assuming no other issues. This can be seen in pretty much every past sitting's SOA commentary.
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Old 04-23-2019, 08:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TranceBrah View Post
Not sure if Breadmaker is answering the same question but OP is correct. If you get some answer for (a), you should use it when answering (b).

If you show all your work/formulas for part (b) and the answer is consistent with the answer from (a) then (b) will be awarded full marks, assuming no other issues. This can be seen in pretty much every past sitting's SOA commentary.
I think part of Breadmaker's comment is that the "answer" to part a needs to NOT be such that answering part b becomes "trivial".

As for the rest of this statement, this is consistent with how the CAS approaches grading their upper level Exams.
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Old 04-27-2019, 05:47 PM
mnb14 mnb14 is offline
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There's two different answers depending on part a.

If Part A is a "The answer is 1,000 to the nearest 10, calculate to the nearest 1" type question and you cannot calculate to the nearest 1, then use the 1,000 provided in part b. Most times this will be the type of question you see on parts that utilize previously calculated values.

If this is not the case and you are unsure how to calculate part a, then try your hardest to arrive at a value and use that value moving forward in part b. You will get penalized in part a for not calculating the correct value, but not in part b for using the incorrect value appropriately.

Hope this helps! Good luck!
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