Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Cyberchat > Non-Actuarial Topics
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions


Upload your resume securely at https://www.dwsimpson.com
to be contacted when new jobs meet your skills and objectives.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #41  
Old 02-14-2018, 11:22 AM
mathmajor's Avatar
mathmajor mathmajor is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Nowhere in particular
Studying for Japanese
College: B.S. Applied Math
Favorite beer: La Croix Grapefruit
Posts: 9,130
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by IANAE View Post
Last cleaning was after 3 years... Teeth so clean dentist asked if I had been "seeing someone else".
__________________
FSA
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 02-14-2018, 02:51 PM
3rookie 3rookie is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 12,890
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CowboyGuy View Post
Even after insurance coverage, dental costs can be crazy. I had a preventive care procedure done that was fully covered by insurance. But then I was prescribed a root canal and I'll have to pay $450 for the visit ($150 for consultation and $300 for root canal). After the root canal, I'll be needing a crown in that spot, that'll run me about $350.

The dentist also strongly recommends getting deep cleaning done. I wanna get it done as I wanna avoid the possibility of another cavity/infection and subsequently another potential root canal. Although it is covered 85%, the medication that they give along with that is an elective procedure that is not covered by insurance at all. The total cost for deep cleaning procedure along with medication will be $200 ($80 for deep cleaning and $120 for the medication). Maybe I can opt out of medication and use the OTC ones.

All in all, I'm looking at a grand. This is in addition to the insurance premium that I pay.

I have a friend whose parents spend sometime abroad every year. The dental costs there are super low compared to the U.S. and they get their dental work done whenever they go there.

Ok enough of ranting. Is there even a workaround for this? I heard there are some free clinics (that run on charity) or cheaper ones that charge a fixed fee for every visit. This is the cheap actuary inside me finding it kinda annoying to pay so much out of pocket, even after insurance coverage.
All dentists are not created equal. If you go to a DMO (high volume mill), you will receive suboptimal care. The work will generally fail earlier because they must cut costs (materials, lab, time) in order to discount their rates to the DMO-agreed rates. $350/crown is a joke price. Can't run a practice that way, unless it's super high volume.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flower View Post
Two pieces of advice

1. You get what you pay for
2. Get a second opinion
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 02-14-2018, 08:31 PM
MathStatFin's Avatar
MathStatFin MathStatFin is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 4,667
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CowboyGuy View Post
Normally one may not need deep cleaning but I gotta admit in the past year or so I haven't taken care of my gums as much as I should have. There have been weeks that I didn't floss. This dentist that I've started going to is super nice, did a very thorough exam that none of my dentists have ever done in the past, gave me helpful tips and stood with me for half hour just to explain everything about build ups, pulpal exposure, cavities, root canals etc. In addition to x-ray, he also showed me pictures that he took with a special camera that showed the build ups inside the gums.
If you have problems with your gums then they might recede over time. In the short run, it doesn't really cause cavities or anything. your tooth gets more and more exposed and you might develop tooth sensitivity.

Cavities are usually a symptom of a diet high in artificial sugars (fructose/glucose). Don't drink soda. Don't eat those tasty candies laced with citric acid. use a straw when drinking sugary beverages. Did you ever ask yourself what people did when they didn't have modern dentistry? Turns out people didn't get that many cavities due to the absence of artificial sugar in their diet.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 02-15-2018, 12:08 PM
Mel's Avatar
Mel Mel is offline
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 425
Default

I recently had the "deep cleaning" done due to not being good to my teeth and gums for a few years. I brushed regularly but was not flossing very much and avoided even a cleaning for almost three years.

Anyhow...GET THE MEDICINE...trust me on this. I didn't and very truly wished that I had. Silver lining - I NEVER want to experience that pain again and thus brush 2-3 times per day and floss on a regular schedule now
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 02-15-2018, 12:23 PM
DataDan's Avatar
DataDan DataDan is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: East Coast US
Posts: 3,073
Default

Some discussion about dental insurance and costs w/ and w/o:

http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...d.php?t=318828

in short, dental 'insurance' is really just 'network rates access'.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 02-15-2018, 01:11 PM
CowboyGuy CowboyGuy is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,977
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
Some discussion about dental insurance and costs w/ and w/o:

http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...d.php?t=318828

in short, dental 'insurance' is really just 'network rates access'.


That's an informative thread!
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 02-15-2018, 01:24 PM
kmhst25's Avatar
kmhst25 kmhst25 is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,026
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MathStatFin View Post
If you have problems with your gums then they might recede over time. In the short run, it doesn't really cause cavities or anything. your tooth gets more and more exposed and you might develop tooth sensitivity.

Cavities are usually a symptom of a diet high in artificial sugars (fructose/glucose). Don't drink soda. Don't eat those tasty candies laced with citric acid. use a straw when drinking sugary beverages. Did you ever ask yourself what people did when they didn't have modern dentistry? Turns out people didn't get that many cavities due to the absence of artificial sugar in their diet.
You can pry the sugar from my cold, dead, toothless mouth.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.33250 seconds with 10 queries