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Old 01-15-2004, 04:17 PM
Fun King ded Fun King ded is offline
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Default Off Site and/or Long Commute workers - Location

I'm considering reentering the actuarial profession after a five-year break. I realize there are issues associated with the gap. Assuming the worker meets your needs, I'm looking for information regarding you or your company's hiring practices regarding non-traditional workers.

Long Distance Commuters - any commute over 2 hours one way. Are concessions made, such as a 4-day workweek or do they carry the burden themselves? Do you have or would you consider workers with their primary residence too far to commute so they just come to your location for the workweek?

Remote Workers - off site employees, they may be in another city or state or simply working from home. Do you have any? Would consider using them?

Contract workers - Rather than hire a full time person would you hire trained temp help for projects or financial reporting assistance around deadlines?
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Old 01-15-2004, 04:30 PM
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Default Re: Off Site and/or Long Commute workers - Location

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Big Stick
I'm considering reentering the actuarial profession after a five-year break. I realize there are issues associated with the gap. Assuming the worker meets your needs, I'm looking for information regarding you or your company's hiring practices regarding non-traditional workers.

(1) Long Distance Commuters - any commute over 2 hours one way. Are concessions made, such as a 4-day workweek or do they carry the burden themselves? Do you have or would you consider workers with their primary residence too far to commute so they just come to your location for the workweek?

(2) Remote Workers - off site employees, they may be in another city or state or simply working from home. Do you have any? Would consider using them?

(3) Contract workers - Rather than hire a full time person would you hire trained temp help for projects or financial reporting assistance around deadlines?
(1): I'd ask you about your plan to handle this matter. If you suggested the possibility of ME being flexible, I'd suggest that the issue could be discussed AFTER you have been working for me for about a year.

(2): Yes. Again, only after I have had an opportunity to see how you work for a year.

(3): Possibly. There are many logistical issues associated with this. Eventually, you'd have to be a full-time employee.
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Old 01-15-2004, 05:05 PM
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I had a long commute at a previous job (2-2 1/2 hrs). After I had been working for the company a while (year to year and a half), I was allowed to work 1-2 days a week at home, although I never asked about a reduced schedule. From the start, I got a few extras (like being able to stay at home for study time when most had to be in the office, etc.) since I had such a long drive (I helped them see why it was better for me (and them) to provide these extras, though.)
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Old 01-15-2004, 06:18 PM
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I re-entered the actuarial field about 2 yrs ago after a hiatus of 8 yrs.
Although I found a job easily enough, it required a 1.5 hr drive each way (I realize it's not quite your 2 hr threshold).
I commuted 5 days a week, until I developed a serious health condition.
Now, I work from home on a company supplied laptop, using a company-paid cell phone and high speed internet connection so I can access the company intranet.
I think that I spent enough time working in the office and was missed enough when I was out that they "saw the light" and are allowing me to work remotely.
However, I make it a point to spend a day in the office every 2 or 3 weeks, just so everyone remembers me and knows I'm still around. (I interact with most departments on the company.)
My advice would be to take the job--if it's a good fit for you--work there a year or so and only then ask about telecommuting.
Just my $.02.
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Old 01-16-2004, 11:22 AM
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If you're reentering the field after a break, I assume you'll be taking exams. You could uses this 4+ hours of commuting time to study to and from work. Maybe if your co. provides study time you can leave a little early and count the time studying on your commute home.
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Old 01-16-2004, 03:50 PM
Fun King ded Fun King ded is offline
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Thanks for the responses!

Since I'm looking for an unconventional work schedule and it sounds like I would need to see work for a year first. Would approaching a perspective employer with an ititial short time contract to prove my ability to perform as a trade off against the unconventional schedule be a viable alternative?
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Old 01-16-2004, 03:51 PM
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I guess a simpler way to say that is:

Do actuarial employers hire contract workers? If so, at what level?
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Old 01-23-2004, 09:27 AM
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There are actuarial temp jobs, though I don't know much about them. Perhaps Claude would know more.

I get the impression that they are mostly as the ASA/FSA level, but I could easily be wrong about that.
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Old 02-23-2004, 08:21 PM
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Default Re: Off Site and/or Long Commute workers - Location

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Big Stick
Remote Workers - off site employees, they may be in another city or state or simply working from home. Do you have any? Would consider using them?
I work for ERC and although the home office is in Kansas City, only 1/3 of the employees work in one of the two offices in KC. I telecommute. GE (which owns ERC) and ERC are big on telecommuting. However, I did work in the office for 2 years. If you are experienced, telecommuting could be an option right away. Or there might be an office close to where you live right now.
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Old 02-24-2004, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Big Stick
I guess a simpler way to say that is:

Do actuarial employers hire contract workers? If so, at what level?
I think that a lot of the work that I do as an independent consultant is close in nature to that of a part-time contract worker, though it's never labeled as that.

Chuck
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