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  #11  
Old 11-10-2015, 08:37 PM
clarinetist clarinetist is offline
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I have with the Department of Education doing education statistics reporting and analysis using R and SQL. My pay cut was $65.7k (actuarial) -> $60k (current job), and so far, I'm very satisfied with the switch.

I used Indeed, Monster, and Careerbuilder for this search. None of them help with anything other than to add spam to my account. You might find a few gems in Indeed, but everything else is crap, in my experience. The method that has always given me the most success is looking at company-specific websites. If you're concentrated on actuarial, use the SOA directory. Easy way to find companies and to go to their websites and apply directly. A lot of places don't bother posting their positions on Indeed, Monster, and the like.
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  #12  
Old 11-10-2015, 08:38 PM
clarinetist clarinetist is offline
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Originally Posted by Aspiring Act View Post
Do you have any $$$ saved up? Have you ever thought about going back to school for a computer science degree? It is a very hot field and hiring is expected to continue to rise. If you could pass actuarial exams like you did, you could definitely do it.
Computer Science has its share of crappy jobs too. Yes, it's high in demand, but some of the high-profile jobs in CS are way more stressful than actuarial, IME.

Also, I dare say that passing actuarial exams is not a good metric for assessing success in CS. Programming, IMO, is a lot more abstract than actuarial exam material.
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  #13  
Old 11-10-2015, 09:03 PM
hello_actuary hello_actuary is offline
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Man, you have a lot of experience, but you also need to be good at selling yourself well. You have 7 exams and several years of experience. If you search senior actuarial jobs on indeed.com or glassdoor, you will see several pages of relevant jobs pop up.

Based on your senior level experience, have you done any achievements for your department most independently? Even you made some team work contribution, you would share these good points with interviewers.

But if you search for intermediate or lower level analyst positions, people would doubt your ability to do quality work since your experience level and exam progress should be good enough to be an actuary.

Do not sell yourself short.
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  #14  
Old 11-10-2015, 09:07 PM
hello_actuary hello_actuary is offline
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Originally Posted by lllj View Post
government jobs- usajobs.gov although there are really specific requirements for people with experience so it may be difficult to qualify for something non-actuarial. state governments might post elsewhere.

i got from your post that you don't want to be an actuary, is that right? honestly, i think most of your other options would be more stressful, not less. plus you'd have to learn a bunch more stuff which might be stressful in itself. have you considered that working as an actuary at a different company/role might be less stressful? having had only one job, you don't have much to go on that says being an actuary is without a doubt too stressful for you.

you could probably also look for generic financial/data analyst jobs. this job title could mean about 1000 different things, some more stressful than others, but worth looking into. ust search "analyst" (as others mentioned, use indeed), and you'll get a billion results in NY but just browse through and read descriptions and see what sounds interesting/what you seem qualified for.

there are some jobs out there at insurance companies that do sort of similar work to actuarial analysts but don't require exams. or different but less stressful work. you can try going to insurance companies' websites and going to the careers page and see if anything sounds interesting to you that isn't actuarial. relatively speaking, i don't think insurance companies are terribly stressful places to work so may be a good place to start, plus you have experience in insurance. i do think there are probably roles at my company that are less stressful than the actuarial roles, but they're probably also a bit more boring/require less thinking/pay less. we've got a lot of data/financial reporting folks across different divisions of the company who do various things, then some non-actuaries in the regulatory department who work closely with actuaries on state filings and data calls. maybe consider that sort of stuff?

first recommendation is an actuarial role though.

hardest part will be getting callbacks given length of time out of work, i think.
I applied for a government actuarial analyst job this early Spring, but I did not hear back grades until last month. The actuarial job only required grades which was an overall assessment of college transcripts and experience.

No actuarial exam was mentioned in the selection process, which was weird.
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  #15  
Old 11-10-2015, 09:11 PM
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lllj lllj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clarinetist View Post
I have with the Department of Education doing education statistics reporting and analysis using R and SQL. My pay cut was $65.7k (actuarial) -> $60k (current job), and so far, I'm very satisfied with the switch.

I used Indeed, Monster, and Careerbuilder for this search. None of them help with anything other than to add spam to my account. You might find a few gems in Indeed, but everything else is crap, in my experience. The method that has always given me the most success is looking at company-specific websites. If you're concentrated on actuarial, use the SOA directory. Easy way to find companies and to go to their websites and apply directly. A lot of places don't bother posting their positions on Indeed, Monster, and the like.
Indeed is the Google of job search. Companies don't need to post their jobs there directly; it searches job boards and company websites. Doesn't get everything, but most.
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  #16  
Old 11-10-2015, 09:18 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
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Originally Posted by hamstrman View Post
I posted my resume on Monster...
How could this possibly help? Those were all recruiters, because they're all that trawl Monster.

Some simple steps:
1. Look for companies you want to work at.
2. Look in the Actuarial Directory for someone who works there with an important title.
3. Send your résumé.
4. Wait a week or so.
5. Call the same person at the phone number in the drectory and ask if he/she/Caitlyn has seen your résumé. If not, send again. If so, ask if you can meet to discuss it and you.

This is off the top of the tête.
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  #17  
Old 11-10-2015, 09:27 PM
MathStatFin MathStatFin is offline
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Originally Posted by Sheffey View Post
what exactly stresses you out about insurance companies?
Because the claims never stop

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpN00-UTrY0
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  #18  
Old 11-10-2015, 09:35 PM
hello_actuary hello_actuary is offline
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Originally Posted by MathStatFin View Post
Because the claims never stop

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zpN00-UTrY0
Don't you collect premium too?

But if claims grow much faster and bigger than premiums, the company can be closed soon.

That's why they need actuaries, claim adjusters, and other professionals to balance claims and premiums to maintain and expand profitable growth.
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  #19  
Old 11-10-2015, 11:52 PM
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hamstrman hamstrman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lllj View Post
i got from your post that you don't want to be an actuary, is that right? honestly, i think most of your other options would be more stressful, not less. plus you'd have to learn a bunch more stuff which might be stressful in itself. have you considered that working as an actuary at a different company/role might be less stressful? having had only one job, you don't have much to go on that says being an actuary is without a doubt too stressful for you.
You're probably right. Having finished 7 exams, people are just like, "You only have one left! What's the big deal?" and I just can't do it anymore. I refer to myself as the most expensive nothing one could hire. Highest salary short of an FSA designation without the energy and (to a lesser extent) the desire to become one.

And yes, there were some unique circumstances at work that definitely have me scared to go back.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lllj View Post
there are some jobs out there at insurance companies that do sort of similar work to actuarial analysts but don't require exams. or different but less stressful work. you can try going to insurance companies' websites and going to the careers page and see if anything sounds interesting to you that isn't actuarial. relatively speaking, i don't think insurance companies are terribly stressful places to work so may be a good place to start, plus you have experience in insurance. i do think there are probably roles at my company that are less stressful than the actuarial roles, but they're probably also a bit more boring/require less thinking/pay less. we've got a lot of data/financial reporting folks across different divisions of the company who do various things, then some non-actuaries in the regulatory department who work closely with actuaries on state filings and data calls. maybe consider that sort of stuff?

first recommendation is an actuarial role though.

hardest part will be getting callbacks given length of time out of work, i think.
Can't say I'd mind boring/less thinking/pay less... At least I say that in the hopes of lower expectations. I come with no self-worth my whole life, so I've been reading job descriptions and thinking, "I can't do that!" Nothing looks doable.

I do think I'm stuck being an actuary, like you and others have said.

I got into this profession because it was "automatic raises" by passing math tests. A great combination! I'm dedicated, but I'm not a "motivated go-getter," so I relied on that. I'm not AT ALL interested in becoming a director or an AVP. I want a job, do it well, keep having job. Although stuffing envelopes all day would probably drive me mad.
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  #20  
Old 11-10-2015, 11:54 PM
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hamstrman hamstrman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sheffey View Post
what exactly stresses you out about insurance companies?
It was probably uniquely crappy circumstances that I got lucky to have to deal with. But deal with that for years and you stop believing you can do anything right. Luckily, I can keep that belief to myself during interviews!
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