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  #61  
Old 12-13-2018, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by ALivelySedative View Post
Yeah. How study for dis? Any point to buying the study kit? Or just use online text references + the one book? Or just TIA it to a hopeful 6? I've seen so many different approaches. I know CrystalClear has done an exam 6 manual the last couple sittings. Anyone out there use it or able to comment? Her upper level manuals have gotten high praise, but they don't come with any sample/exam questions mapped to the material (I don't think??).
I'll give my experience. I took and passed 6 in Spring 2018 and got a 7.

The amount of material on this exam is brutal. It's the hardest one to study for that I've taken so far. Yet, actual exam day was easier imo than 5 and 8. I finished with an hour to go, so time isn't as much of a factor on exam day. Maybe this has changed in a year's time, I haven't kept up.

I used TIA and occasionally looked at the source PDF from the CAS site. The TIA guy is soooo boring and hard to listen to, but I think it still helped immensely. About a month before exam day I started listening to the TIA videos on things that I struggled to grasp, on the commute to work (30 min). Eventually I knew what he was going to say on the video.

This is the only exam imo that you do not need to know everything thoroughly. It was hard for me to go into exam day knowing I only knew a little about everything. But, I think that is the only way to approach this. You will not be able to understand everything on the syllabus, or memorize everything. Don't try to (especially if this is your first attempt).

Know the typical calculation problems well, there aren't too many of them. It's all of the written questions that will be the biggest hurdle. The point total for a given part tells you how much to write, don't ramble or add useless facts. Also, don't even bother to write full sentences is you don't want to. Bullet points work well.

My last suggestion is that you don't need "practice exams" in the sense that I know that some people save recent exams as a test for themselves as exam day nears. I would use the last few sittings as main study questions and not save them for a week before the exam. Yes, the CAS seems to always try to find new things that they haven't tested before, but this will be 2 or 3 questions that you can't know in advance anyway. Get the other 20 questions right. There are go-to topics that they include in the exam every few sittings. There's no excuse to miss those.

Maybe there's not as much advice in this post as I intended, but this was my experience. I think people psych themselves out over the size of the syllabus and study manuals. The material is not difficult, there's just a lot of it. That's how I feel anyway.
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  #62  
Old 12-13-2018, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by ALivelySedative View Post
Yeah. How study for dis? Any point to buying the study kit? Or just use online text references + the one book? Or just TIA it to a hopeful 6? I've seen so many different approaches. I know CrystalClear has done an exam 6 manual the last couple sittings. Anyone out there use it or able to comment? Her upper level manuals have gotten high praise, but they don't come with any sample/exam questions mapped to the material (I don't think??).
My $0.02... I squeaked by with a 6 this past sitting using solely TIA (and by extension the historical exam problems, although I limited myself to roughly the last 5 years of exams under the notion that the older exams' questions are either on too different material or are otherwise not of similar quality (they tended to seem easier or simply test on memorization that is no longer as tested))

Within TIA I basically printed out all the study guides (hundreds of pages, including those exam problems) and divvied them up into their sections and went through taking notes and doing problems with varying degrees of focus on the problems as I approached the end. By the end I'd probably done 3.5 passes through the entire thing, with a bit more in areas I felt rusty on near the end.

Going into the exam I felt quite decently prepared, and I realized later I made a few silly errors on the exam that I think is part of the reason I squeaked by, with the study method above I think you (or I) could have done slightly better than 6.

The real hole I found after taking the exam in the method above was having spent so little time (literally none) on the source material. I knew it was a risk but it became apparent during the exam that the exam writers certainly contemplate what's covered in TIA and the source material and try to find gaps on which to ask detailed questions. If I had failed my re-take strategy was going to be a bit more of the above for further understanding but definitely a full read through the source, with some particular focus on areas I felt might have gaps from TIA, so that I had at least some exposure to everything that might be tested. I certainly plan to at least once read through all source material on all future exams.

I'd also agree that time wasn't really a huge worry for me on this exam. Honestly I think this exam is, more than any other, one where you know it or you don't. I finished with about an hour left to review (which was a shame since in the end I only changed one problem and turned it from a correct answer into an incorrect one......).

Best of luck!

Last edited by NormalDan; 12-13-2018 at 11:20 AM.. Reason: grammar
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  #63  
Old 12-13-2018, 11:19 AM
OliverQueen OliverQueen is offline
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Originally Posted by ALivelySedative View Post
Yeah. How study for dis? Any point to buying the study kit? Or just use online text references + the one book? Or just TIA it to a hopeful 6? I've seen so many different approaches. I know CrystalClear has done an exam 6 manual the last couple sittings. Anyone out there use it or able to comment? Her upper level manuals have gotten high praise, but they don't come with any sample/exam questions mapped to the material (I don't think??).
I got a 7 using CrystalClear and Casual Fellow, while reading maybe 10% of the source material. CrystalClear is an easier read but has more errors in it. If I could only get one I'd probably go with Casual Fellow, but they actually complement each other pretty well.
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  #64  
Old 12-13-2018, 11:56 AM
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Back in after getting a bs 5.

I'd rather punch myself in the face than start reading this again....
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  #65  
Old 12-13-2018, 12:02 PM
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Originally Posted by KS6392 View Post
I'll give my experience. I took and passed 6 in Spring 2018 and got a 7.

The amount of material on this exam is brutal. It's the hardest one to study for that I've taken so far. Yet, actual exam day was easier imo than 5 and 8. I finished with an hour to go, so time isn't as much of a factor on exam day. Maybe this has changed in a year's time, I haven't kept up.

I used TIA and occasionally looked at the source PDF from the CAS site. The TIA guy is soooo boring and hard to listen to, but I think it still helped immensely. About a month before exam day I started listening to the TIA videos on things that I struggled to grasp, on the commute to work (30 min). Eventually I knew what he was going to say on the video.

This is the only exam imo that you do not need to know everything thoroughly. It was hard for me to go into exam day knowing I only knew a little about everything. But, I think that is the only way to approach this. You will not be able to understand everything on the syllabus, or memorize everything. Don't try to (especially if this is your first attempt).

Know the typical calculation problems well, there aren't too many of them. It's all of the written questions that will be the biggest hurdle. The point total for a given part tells you how much to write, don't ramble or add useless facts. Also, don't even bother to write full sentences is you don't want to. Bullet points work well.

My last suggestion is that you don't need "practice exams" in the sense that I know that some people save recent exams as a test for themselves as exam day nears. I would use the last few sittings as main study questions and not save them for a week before the exam. Yes, the CAS seems to always try to find new things that they haven't tested before, but this will be 2 or 3 questions that you can't know in advance anyway. Get the other 20 questions right. There are go-to topics that they include in the exam every few sittings. There's no excuse to miss those.

Maybe there's not as much advice in this post as I intended, but this was my experience. I think people psych themselves out over the size of the syllabus and study manuals. The material is not difficult, there's just a lot of it. That's how I feel anyway.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NormalDan View Post
My $0.02... I squeaked by with a 6 this past sitting using solely TIA (and by extension the historical exam problems, although I limited myself to roughly the last 5 years of exams under the notion that the older exams' questions are either on too different material or are otherwise not of similar quality (they tended to seem easier or simply test on memorization that is no longer as tested))

Within TIA I basically printed out all the study guides (hundreds of pages, including those exam problems) and divvied them up into their sections and went through taking notes and doing problems with varying degrees of focus on the problems as I approached the end. By the end I'd probably done 3.5 passes through the entire thing, with a bit more in areas I felt rusty on near the end.

Going into the exam I felt quite decently prepared, and I realized later I made a few silly errors on the exam that I think is part of the reason I squeaked by, with the study method above I think you (or I) could have done slightly better than 6.

The real hole I found after taking the exam in the method above was having spent so little time (literally none) on the source material. I knew it was a risk but it became apparent during the exam that the exam writers certainly contemplate what's covered in TIA and the source material and try to find gaps on which to ask detailed questions. If I had failed my re-take strategy was going to be a bit more of the above for further understanding but definitely a full read through the source, with some particular focus on areas I felt might have gaps from TIA, so that I had at least some exposure to everything that might be tested. I certainly plan to at least once read through all source material on all future exams.

I'd also agree that time wasn't really a huge worry for me on this exam. Honestly I think this exam is, more than any other, one where you know it or you don't. I finished with about an hour left to review (which was a shame since in the end I only changed one problem and turned it from a correct answer into an incorrect one......).

Best of luck!
Thanks for the info! I think I'll try to mainly use TIA, and if I feel motivated enough I'll read the source material. I was able to get by on 5 really well with just TIA, but I've heard 6 is a different beast.
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  #66  
Old 12-13-2018, 03:06 PM
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The 'complete online text references' download is 1800+ pages. Do these include pages/appendices that are excluded from the actual syllabus? Or is the 1800+ pages just the material on the actual syllabus? The latter case is frightening.
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  #67  
Old 12-13-2018, 03:13 PM
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The 'complete online text references' download is 1800+ pages. Do these include pages/appendices that are excluded from the actual syllabus? Or is the 1800+ pages just the material on the actual syllabus? The latter case is frightening.
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ASM does not have a discussion of stimulation, but considering how boring the manual is, maybe it would be a good idea.
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  #68  
Old 12-13-2018, 03:17 PM
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The 'complete online text references' download is 1800+ pages. Do these include pages/appendices that are excluded from the actual syllabus? Or is the 1800+ pages just the material on the actual syllabus? The latter case is frightening.


Yep... That's why we should go ahead and get started.
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  #69  
Old 12-13-2018, 03:23 PM
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rude
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Yep... That's why we should go ahead and get started.
gross

i'm about to make our print desk ppl really happy...
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  #70  
Old 12-13-2018, 03:25 PM
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rude
My bad.

For me preparing for this exam started out really rough when it was basically a bunch of disconnected topics, then got better once I ran through the syllabus once and started to see how everything fit together, then bad again near the end when I again realized how much material was testable.
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ASM does not have a discussion of stimulation, but considering how boring the manual is, maybe it would be a good idea.
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