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  #41  
Old 11-16-2009, 07:42 AM
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More on the Netherlands:
http://www.globalpensions.com/global...ion-age-reform
Quote:
NETHERLANDS – The Dutch government’s planned reform on retirement age which would see Dutch workers retiring at 67 instead of 65 came under the fire of the opposition parties during a parliamentary debate yesterday.

In spring this year, the Dutch government announced plans to increase the pension age. It also granted half a year for the unions and the employers representatives to come up with alternative proposals, but the different stakeholders failed to find an agreement (Global Pensions, October 2, 2009)

Under the current government plans, the retirement age will be raised from 65 to 66 in 2020 and then to 67 in 2027.

In addition, the government plans to keep the retirement age at 65 for workers employed in ‘tough professions', provided they meet certain requirements. Another option proposed by the government would be that employers give these employees different jobs, so that they could work longer.
....
SP spokesman Bas Stoffelsen told GP: "Only 13% of the people who are 64 in the Netherlands are working now. The government should concentrate on making people work until they are 65 to begin with."

The spokesman added the SP was proposing alternative measures to shore up public finances, such as reviewing the government subsides on mortgage payments and the current taxation regime to international companies based in the Netherlands.
....
Liberal Party spokesman Steff Block said: "In January we proposed a different reform plan, according to which the pension age of 65 should be raised by one month every year that is worked. The increase would stop if and when it reaches the age of 67.

"There would be an exception for people who have worked for 40 years and earned at least 70% of the minimum wage. This reform coupled with lowering the current tax relief on pensions benefit would result in 0.7% improvement in public finances that the government is targeting."
....
Dutch Association for Pension Interests (NBP) chairman Kees de Lange said the pension age "was not the problem and increasing it was counterproductive".

He said: "Rising the age to 67 will have the effect that older employees encounter a serious income gap that will lead to a larger dependence on unemployment benefits and even the need for the most basic support.

"We call this the poverty trap. In that sense the supposed economic benefits of rising the age to 67 will largely disappear. This is a disastrous plan that will lead to serious social unrest."
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  #42  
Old 11-23-2009, 07:05 AM
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The Dutch thing still going on
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...KiTcBe_wUp4dAA

Quote:
THE HAGUE — Thousands of workers protested in four Dutch cities on Saturday against a government decision to increase the state retirement age from 65 to 67 by 2025.

"We think it is wrong for the government to seek to achieve savings by making people work longer," Paulus Plas, a spokesman for the country's largest labour organisation, the FNV, told AFP.
....

The Dutch cabinet last month announced that the pensionable age would rise to 66 in 2020 and 67 five years later, citing deteriorating state finances and the need to boost labour participation as the Netherlands deals with a greying workforce.

"Currently, we have four working people for every pensioner; soon this will be two to one. What does this mean for the younger generations?" Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende said.
....
A recent FNV-commissioned opinion poll found that three quarters of Dutch nationals do not support the plan, believing that they would themselves be disadvantaged by it.

According to Plas, "people with the lowest levels of education, who start working earlier, earn less and have a shorter life expectancy will suffer the most."
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  #43  
Old 11-30-2009, 08:02 AM
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Slovenia
http://in.reuters.com/article/worldN...44310420091128

Quote:
LJUBLJANA (Reuters) - Some 30,000 workers, pensioners and students from all over Slovenia demonstrated in the centre of Ljubljana on Saturday for a higher minimum wage and against a rise in the retirement age.

Trade unions organised the gathering to back their demand for a 31 percent rise in the minimum wage to 600 euros ($900) and the scrapping of a government plan to raise the retirement age to 65.

At present men can retire at 58 and women at 56 in Slovenia.
Punjab:
http://www.punjabnewsline.com/content/view/21350/38/
Quote:
When asked about the proposal of increasing retirement age of State employees from 58 to 60 years, Mr Badal replied that it was still under consideration of State government and no final decision has been taken in this regard.
Further in India:
http://www.telegraphindia.com/109112...y_11796798.jsp
Quote:
New Delhi, Nov. 27: A key Parliament panel has criticised the government’s decision to raise the retirement age of teachers at central higher education institutions from 62 to 65, saying this will kill opportunities for young aspirants.

The parliament standing committee on human resource development has asked the HRD ministry to review its decision to raise the retirement age, rejecting its argument that it will help combat faculty shortage.
....
The panel’s report argues that instead of raising the retirement age, the government should focus on motivating the youth to take up teaching and on making the profession more attractive.
....


The ministry in March 2008 issued orders raising the retirement age of faculty at all central higher education institutions from 62 to 65. This included central universities and institutions like the IITs, IIMs and the National Institutes of Technology.
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  #44  
Old 12-05-2009, 09:42 AM
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More on the Netherlands
http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archive...hould_star.php

Quote:
The government’s economic policy advisor CPB has joined the council of state in criticising the cabinet’s timetable for increasing the age for state pensions from 65 to 67.

The cabinet has said it will raise the pension age to 66 in 2020 and to 67 five years later. But in its analysis published on Friday, the CPB says it would make more sense to take a ‘meaningful step’ in raising the pension age in 2015 to prevent a new cabinet from going back on the decision.
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  #45  
Old 12-07-2009, 11:20 AM
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China and gender parity
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20...t_12592911.htm

Quote:
BEIJING, Dec. 5 -- In an era of drastic changes, it is unusual to see "provisional" regulations enacted 30 years ago to remain in force even today, especially when millions count on these provisions to secure their futures post-retirement.

It is definitely peculiar that such provisions, once deemed protective of women, have attracted criticism as being discriminative. These relate to regulations regarding the retirement ages of men and women.

On June 2, 1978, the Provisional Methods of the State Council on Placement of Senior, Weak, Sick or Disabled Cadres and the Provisional Methods of the State Council on Retirement or Resignation of Workers were both promulgated. The former regulation set the age of retirement of women cadres at 55 while the latter set 50 as the age of retirement for women workers. According to both the "provisional methods", the age of retirement for men was capped at 60.

Five years later, the State Council raised the retirement age for certain categories of women professionals, such as those in the educational, medicine and science fields, to 60, and their male colleagues, to 65.

The new limits originated in the Labor Insurance Regulation of the People's Republic of China issued on Jan 2, 1953, which had initially set the age of retirement at 60 for men and 50 for women.

Complaints against the retirement age gap, however, emerged in 2000; and the debate became widespread from 2003 onwards, with many professionals complaining that the practice was unfair to women. They put forward many reasons to show why the rules permitting the differential retirement ages should be scrapped.

First, they said, the current scheme ran counter to the constitutional spirit of gender equality and failed to keep pace with women's growing clamor for gender parity. Second, women professionals at 55 were at their best work-wise, showing maturity in skills, professional expertise and the least household burden, they said. Their retirement was a waste of human resources, they argued. Third, early retirement caused monetary losses for women. According to the women's association head of Hebei province, Wang Shuling, a woman professional would get 168,575 yuan ($24,790) less than a male colleague if the five-year retirement age difference were taken into account. And, the higher the educational background of the women, the heavier the losses, she said. Fourth, the early retirement system makes it hard for women to attain higher positions in politics or academia. Fifth, working longer is good for women's physical and psychological health. And lastly, more countries have opted for same-age retirement systems, and the more advanced the nation, the higher was the retirement age limit, they said.
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  #46  
Old 12-28-2009, 08:19 AM
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Bulgaria
http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=111335

Quote:
The retirement age in Bulgaria will gradually go up until 2022, but will not surpass 65 years for men and women.

The information was revealed by the Minister of Social Policy and Labor, Totyu Mladenov, Tuesday.

Mladenov said that after 2011, his Ministry is to prepare a 10-year schedule for the gradual increase of the retirement age. The exact details of how the schedule is going to be prepared are to become known after January 20, when the Retirement Reform Council will propose particular changes in the system. Current retirement age in Bulgaria is 60 years for women and 63 years for men.
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  #47  
Old 01-11-2010, 12:19 PM
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This is not so much a retirement age change as trying to change mandatory retirement requirements, one way or another.

From the UK, removing mandatory retirement ages
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...etirement.html

Quote:
Harriet Harman, the Minister for Women and Equality, is to argue that a major change in the law is needed to alter the perception that people are "past it" once they reach 65.

Labour's deputy leader will today announce a fast-track Government review of the retirement age, and will argue it is "arbitrary" and "bears no relation to people's ability".

She will say that workers would not be forced to work beyond 65, but would have the option to choose to, meaning they could stay on into their 70s or even their 80s.

They should also get a legal right to ask to work part-time or from home, or to request flexible working hours. The change in the law would not alter the point at which the state pension can be claimed and would cover staff who have already signed contracts that say they will retire at the normal age.

Latest figures show a record 1.4 million employees have reached the state pension age of 60 for women and 65 for men. Companies are currently not compelled to agree to their requests to work on, but Miss Harman said the Government wanted to give people the legal right to do so.

In an interview with the Daily Mail she said: "It is a difficult thing for employers, it is challenging to business, but at the end of the day practice has to change as the facts are changing.
I still don't get having a women's retirement age five years younger than men.

And enforcing mandatory retirement on cops and firefighters in Cleveland
http://blog.cleveland.com/metro/2010...refighter.html

Quote:
CLEVELAND, Ohio --- Cleveland’s veteran cops and firefighters used to working past the mandatory retirement age of 65 could be forced out this year.
Police and firefighters have been allowed to work past the retirement date as long as City Council approved the extension -- typically just a formality. But City Council revised the 1975 ordinance in June to give the safety director the power to decide on each extension.
Safety Director Martin Flask anticipates 20 to 25 police officers and firefighters will need an extension if they want to remain on the job. He ordered Police Chief Michael McGrath and Fire Chief Paul Stubbs to review the extension requests and make recommendations. The requests will be decided on the needs of each agency, Flask added.
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  #48  
Old 02-03-2010, 08:02 AM
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Changing the retirement age in Spain

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...TeynHxEsPrwMkQ

Quote:
MADRID — Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero defended Saturday a move to raise the retirement age from 65 to 67, calling it a "reasonable" step to cope with a rapidly ageing population.

"It is a reasonable proposal and a debate over this topic is ongoing in all European nations," he said during a meeting of his ruling Socialist Party.

"It would be easier to do nothing, to not make any proposal, and let the government in power in 2020 or 2025 face the problems of the social security system but that is not our style of governing," he added.
....
A study released this week by Spain's National Statistics Institute predicted that by 2049 there would as many people aged 65 and over in Spain as there are people of working age.
More:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...2DYimI_ton9OTw

Quote:
Two major unions, the CCOO and the UGT, have already condemned the plan.

But Spain's employers' association, the CEOE, has called for the retirement age to be brought up to 70.
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  #49  
Old 02-03-2010, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by campbell View Post

I still don't get having a women's retirement age five years younger than men.
Maybe it was harking from an earlier age and assuming they were married to someone several years older? Or that they had spent less time in school and would have been working earlier?
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  #50  
Old 02-07-2010, 09:41 PM
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Australia
http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news...0207-nkby.html
Quote:
Opposition Leader Tony Abbott has backed away from his earlier comments for the aged pension to be raised to 70, arguing it may never become Liberal Party policy.

In his book Battlelines published last year, Mr Abbott said Australians should not expect to receive the pension at 67, and suggested lifting it to 70.

Asked about this, Mr Abbott went cold on the idea of raising the pension age.

"What you can say as a middle-ranking frontbencher and what you can embrace as party policy are two different things," he told ABC Television on Sunday.

"It is not the party policy and quite possibly never will be."

The federal government announced in the last budget the pension age would be lifted from 65 to 67 from 2023.
Funny how things change when you've got elections on the horizon.
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