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  #11  
Old 06-24-2018, 08:39 PM
jerrytuttle jerrytuttle is offline
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Default My personal philosophy

My personal philosophy is to pass the exams as quickly as you can, when you have the fewest personal responsibilities and the fewest employment responsibilities.

In my case I think it was easier for me to pass an exam at age 25 when I was single with no kids and doing rather routine actuarial work, than it was to pass an exam at age 45 when I was married with three kids and was department head reporting directly to the president.

(Yes, I passed an exam at age 45.)
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  #12  
Old 06-24-2018, 09:12 PM
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PeppermintPatty PeppermintPatty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrytuttle View Post
My personal philosophy is to pass the exams as quickly as you can, when you have the fewest personal responsibilities and the fewest employment responsibilities.

In my case I think it was easier for me to pass an exam at age 25 when I was single with no kids and doing rather routine actuarial work, than it was to pass an exam at age 45 when I was married with three kids and was department head reporting directly to the president.

(Yes, I passed an exam at age 45.)
This. My examples aren't as extreme as Jerry's, but it was way less costly in time (as a fraction of time I had available) to study for exams before kids than after.

I was in an exam 7 review class many years ago, and a fellow student said to me, "I used to study so I could get a raise. Now I study so I don't have to take this exam again."

I agreed with her.
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  #13  
Old 06-24-2018, 09:19 PM
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Colonel Smoothie Colonel Smoothie is offline
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Originally Posted by PeppermintPatty View Post

I was in an exam 7 review class many years ago, and a fellow student said to me, "I used to study so I could get a raise. Now I study so I don't have to take this exam again."

I agreed with her.
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  #14  
Old 06-24-2018, 09:51 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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Originally Posted by kingofants View Post
These are hypothetical assumptions.

The reality is, this whole thread is just a question.
Yes, that's the problem with how you present yourself that I was referring to.
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  #15  
Old 06-24-2018, 10:04 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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Here's how somebody might present this in a discussion without the "I'm making a bunch of assumptions about things I don't really understand and acting like I know a lot more about how things work than I do".


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Originally Posted by kingofants View Post
If you pass one exam a year, then you Will likely get a merit raise at the end of the year.

If you pass two exams a year, is it likely you will NOT get a merit raise at the end of the year?

That seems possible because if you are spending time on 1 exam per year you have more time to work, and can be more productive. And at the end of the year, the company will assess that your skills and productivity are improved. But if you passed 2 exams, would you maybe be overpaid by the end of the year when you count time spent studying and focusing on exam skills rather than job skills, plus you already got a raise that's unrelated to job skills?

Or maybe that doesn't matter as much for compensation, but it seems like it should so maybe somebody explain why that's wrong?
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  #16  
Old 06-25-2018, 07:06 AM
SouthMtn SouthMtn is offline
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Originally Posted by Colymbosathon ecplecticos View Post
At my old shop, if you passed an exam you'd get a 5% raise. If you passed two at once, you'd only get a 10% raise (not the 10.25% you should be entitled to.) I pointed that out, but got little sympathy.
Same experience here.
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  #17  
Old 06-26-2018, 03:25 PM
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DataDan DataDan is offline
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to any exam takers out there- pass exams. dont worry about having too many. dont worry about the specific raise structure at your company. Just get your letters and go from there.

in fact, we should just delete this thread so we dont have to tell people not to read it.
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  #18  
Old 06-26-2018, 04:25 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is online now
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to any exam takers out there- pass exams. dont worry about having too many. dont worry about the specific raise structure at your company. Just get your letters and go from there.

in fact, we should just delete this thread so we dont have to tell people not to read it.
Closing it is a good idea. Can't get bumped to the top that way.
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  #19  
Old 06-26-2018, 04:54 PM
Kalium Kalium is offline
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Originally Posted by kingofants View Post
If you pass one exam a year, then you Will likely get a merit raise at the end of the year.

If you pass two exams a year, then you will likely NOT get a merit raise at the end of the year.

The above statements are true because spending time on 1 exam per year gives you more time to work, thus you are more productive. ...
Using that logic, studying and passing 0 exams a year would make you even more productive! It's not something I recommend.

I think I know of 3 people, over a long period, who did better in their career by giving up exams, compared with hundreds who did better by continuing. And those people who passed more quickly / completed sooner were generally promoted faster and ultimately got to more senior positions than those who took a long time to complete.

Don't neglect your work, particularly at busy times for the department. But subject to that, pass as many exams as you can as quickly as you can.
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  #20  
Old 06-26-2018, 05:22 PM
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whoanonstop whoanonstop is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeppermintPatty View Post
"I used to study so I could get a raise. Now I study so I don't have to take this exam again."
God forbid studying for any other reason.

-Riley
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