Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Health - Disability
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions

DW Simpson
Actuarial Jobs

Visit our site for the most up to date jobs for actuaries.

Actuarial Salary Surveys
Property & Casualty, Health, Life, Pension and Non-Tradtional Jobs.

Actuarial Meeting Schedule
Browse this year's meetings and which recruiters will attend.

Contact DW Simpson
Have a question?
Let's talk.
You'll be glad you did.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-28-2017, 11:06 AM
NoName's Avatar
NoName NoName is offline
Site Supporter
Site Supporter
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 7,745
Default Massachusetts seeks to move adults off Medicaid, limit drug coverage

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/arti...NEWS/170929900

Quote:
Facing steadily rising costs, Massachusetts has asked for federal permission to cull its Medicaid rolls, curb access to in-home and long-term care supports and limit the number of drugs it must cover.

Massachusetts has seen its Medicaid and CHIP population jump more than 30% since it expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. All in all, Medicaid covers 1.9 million Massachusetts residents, or one-third of the state's population.

But as the federal government no longer covers the total cost of expansion, Massachusetts said it needs to slim down the program because the costs are unsustainable.

"At 40% of the commonwealth's budget, MassHealth's continued growth will constrain the state budget unless significant reforms are implemented and key aspects of the program are restructured," Marylou Sudders, the state's health and human services secretary, said in a Sept. 20 letter to CMS Administrator Seema Verma.[...]

Massachusetts isn't the only state to consider changing its expanded Medicaid program as federal funding dwindles. Earlier this year, Oregon announced it was considering kicking expansion enrollees off of Medicaid as a way to generate the savings needed to close a state budget hole. Unlike Massachusetts, Oregon did not plan to offer other coverage and ultimately shelved the proposal.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-28-2017, 01:04 PM
tommie frazier tommie frazier is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Favorite beer: The kind with 2 e's
Posts: 22,945
Default

moving to almost 20 ACO type deals with providers to see if that lever can keep the costs in check.
__________________
Removed a dated athletic reference under pressure from a friend. You can still give money to help fund research on neurofibromatosis (nf).

General info at www.ctf.org

Team donation page here.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-28-2017, 01:57 PM
cincinnatikid cincinnatikid is offline
Member
SOA
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,184
Default

While I think it's incredibly important to get everyone access to quality medical care, it never ceases to amaze me how short-sighted politicians are.

Federal government pays 100%: Medicaid expansion is working.
Federal government payment drops to 95%: This is completely unsustainable for our state.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-28-2017, 02:08 PM
exponentialpi's Avatar
exponentialpi exponentialpi is online now
Member
SOA AAA
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Po
Studying for ACA
College: Graduate of hard knocks
Favorite beer: Cold Smoke
Posts: 1,456
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cincinnatikid View Post
While I think it's incredibly important to get everyone access to quality medical care, it never ceases to amaze me how short-sighted politicians are.

Federal government pays 100%: Medicaid expansion is working.
Federal government payment drops to 95%: This is completely unsustainable for our state.
State Fix: Let's create an insurance premium tax on all commercial policies in the state to support Medicaid.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-14-2017, 01:07 PM
Loner's Avatar
Loner Loner is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: The Third Half
Posts: 45,334
Default

Can't they have a sliding scale premium for Medicaid? Presumably the people at the higher end of the income cap have some capacity to handle copays or a deductible- just roll it into a premium.
__________________
2012 AO Rap Battle Champion
Co-Legend of the Water Cooler(TM)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-16-2017, 12:18 PM
WhosOnFirst WhosOnFirst is offline
Member
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 136
Default

According to KFF, MA received about $1.5 billion for the Medicaid expansion in 2015. 5% of that is about $74 million. Using the 2016 membership as a guide (the membership and dollars are different years in KFF data for some reason), results in a cost burden of about $185 per enrollee. That is about $15 per month. So yes, a small copay or deductible would help chip into those costs and decrease state spending. On the flip side, the enrollees have very low income, about $15K or less for a single person household. Even a $2 copay or $100 deductible might be out of reach. It seems more reasonable to me to institute some cost sharing, spend more in the state budget (which they should have known they were going to do when they took the "free" money for the expansion), and continue the program then it does to just scrap the whole thing and leave all those people without coverage.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.36592 seconds with 9 queries