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  #31  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:22 PM
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Hey, I'm 25! But with 5 years, not 3. And I know I have a lot more to learn before I get to do my ideal job.
Didn't mean to offend!

I'm not necessarily sure I'm worth my salary, either.
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  #32  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:23 PM
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Alrighty, I'll change up my story a bit. I know one girl who was pre ACAS and made 100k (excluding bonus) 3 years out of college in a non consulting role.

I know a few pre-ACAS in Bermuda that make over 100k once you include benefits.
Oh including benefits i was making 100k 5 years out.
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  #33  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:29 PM
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Oh including benefits i was making 100k 5 years out.
(benefits as in housing/car allowance, not medical, 401k, etc.)
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  #34  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:30 PM
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Alrighty, I'll change up my story a bit. I know one girl who was pre ACAS and made 100k (excluding bonus) 3 years out of college in a non consulting role.
Was this in Bermuda as well or the states, Canada, etc?
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  #35  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:30 PM
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Was this in Bermuda as well or the states, Canada, etc?
NYC
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  #36  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:30 PM
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Thanks.
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  #37  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:35 PM
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As others have said, your expectations are (wildly) unrealistic.

If you can make 100k owning a liquor store, have at it. Better yet, hire somebody for 75k to open it for you, and pocket the 25k, that shouldn't be that hard - lots of people would be glad o be making 75k. Mortgages - no, you couldn't. If you have done it three years ago, you could have. That's the risk/reward versus stability thing people are talking about. Kind of like you can't go to Silicon Valley today and be a millionaire in five years, but if you had been smart enough to go there in 1995, you would have for sure been a millionaire in two years. Most people that are mortgage brokers today will be unemployed in two more years. They're barely holding on now, and they've done that by selling product to people that woon't be able to afford a house pretty soon.

You could make a ton as an I-Banker if you wanted to, but you would have to work a heck of a lot more hours than it would have taken you to pass the exams that you failed. You can kid yourself into believing that you will work a lot harder in I-Banking because you want the money, but you're just kidding yourself. People that succeed in IB (or most other things) are successful at everything because they have success in their blood.

Anyway, you're young, there's options - if you don't look at your boss and think you'd like to have his job, then yes, you're in the wrong job, and perhaps the wrong field. But, expecting to switch and make 100k at something else in three years isn't realistic, I don't care what it is. Lots of people make money in sales, just recognize the risks involved - if the economy (or specific demand for your product) turns, you're looking for a job tomorrow (which is really no different than going into mortgages).

Last edited by Westley; 02-09-2007 at 04:52 PM..
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  #38  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Westley View Post
You could make a ton as an I-Banker if you wanted to, but you would have to work a heck of a lot more hours than it would have taken you to pass the exams that you failed. You can kid yourself into believing that you will work a lot harder in I-Banking because you want the money, but you're just kidding yourself. People that succeed in IB (or most other things) are successful at everything because they have success in their blood.
Not to mention it would extremely tough be to make a change unless you know someone or get a top 10 MBA. If you didn't go to a top undergraduate program, and start as an investment banking analyst right out of school, then your most "realistic" chance is through Wharton/HBS.
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  #39  
Old 02-09-2007, 04:54 PM
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Thanks all for the information and experiences you've shared. I have not been passing exams as I should be but I've also seen in my company that exams aren't really requisite to moving up. (Besides for the money they get you in raises). Even my supervisor advised me to stop taking exams (he's not actuarial, nor is the Global health consulting leader or the President, CFO or CEO of the company). What disillusions me is that as a healthcare consultant I see he needed 20 years to get to where he is and even those who are actuarial are sitting around 100k after 8 years of work. I could open up a liquor store or go into mortgages and get to 100k in 3 years. Obviously there's risk in business and I value the stability in the job, but I want to do something "entrepeneurial" in the context of utilizing my analytical, mathematical skills. Is the profession right for me? Are there ways to harness my ambition even at this stage in the game (entry level) or is it strictly skill building at this point? All ideas are very much appreciated.
Well its obvious you think you are smarter than you really are. If you can't handle M or C in a year, don't even think about hedge funds and stuff like that, they will eat you.
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  #40  
Old 02-09-2007, 05:00 PM
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Well its obvious you think you are smarter than you really are. If you can't handle M or C in a year, don't even think about hedge funds and stuff like that, they will eat you.
I disagree with your first sentence. He never said he was super-smart, he said he was super-motivated and super-ambitious. Your second sentence is spot on - I've worked with hedge fund guys, more than any profession I've seen, you are sharp as hell or you're collecting unemployment. they could pass these exams without sweating it, and they would.
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