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  #61  
Old 02-10-2007, 08:34 PM
Gator Cane Gator Cane is offline
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It's a damn good thing there haven't been a raft of tv shows and movies glorifying actuaries.* Otherwise the saturation of wanna-be's would kill this industry, too.

*until I finish my amazing screenplay, that is.
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  #62  
Old 02-10-2007, 08:35 PM
Excited to Begin Excited to Begin is offline
 
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Thanks everyone for the responses. I appreciate all the feedback regardless of how critical it is because I'm looking to find the true answers for my disillusionment. The reality is I have not passed exams for personal reasons I don't want to disclose (trust me they are legit). By no means am I super intelligent but I am an extremely bright math student (as are most people here). The main reason for concern is b/c I view success in my company less dependent on being actuarial and far more dependent on being a good consultant. The only benefit I can really see to passing exams is the raises they are worth (which is nothing to sneeze at) but not actual career development. I'm looking to be very successful and I guess I feel I need to sell business in order to get there. That being the case I question why i took this path at all and didn't go into a more business oriented field. Here I'm not capable of selling for a few years and I see it as a slow process. Maybe I just need to hang on and not get ahead of myself. Thanks again for the responses even if you think I'm a fool, blind and stupid. I'm really just looking for advice and help.
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  #63  
Old 02-10-2007, 08:45 PM
Gator Cane Gator Cane is offline
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You've got your one-year review coming up soon, right? Why not just be candid (albeit polite and measured) with your bosses and say here's my 1-year vision for how I integrate into the company, here's my 3 year plan, etc. Get it on the table and see what they're thinking, now they've got a year's worth of your performance to use as a gauge.
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  #64  
Old 02-10-2007, 11:16 PM
Amy7 Amy7 is offline
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Originally Posted by bjengs View Post
It's a damn good thing there haven't been a raft of tv shows and movies glorifying actuaries.* Otherwise the saturation of wanna-be's would kill this industry, too.

*until I finish my amazing screenplay, that is.
I thought that was going to be the next phase of the SOA image campaign.
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  #65  
Old 02-11-2007, 09:47 AM
Westley Westley is offline
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Originally Posted by bjengs View Post
You've got your one-year review coming up soon, right? Why not just be candid (albeit polite and measured) with your bosses and say here's my 1-year vision for how I integrate into the company, here's my 3 year plan, etc. Get it on the table and see what they're thinking, now they've got a year's worth of your performance to use as a gauge.
Yeah, that's not bad. And, if you're truly as dissatisfied as you sound, I would tell them. They may say you're wildly overestimating your abilities, or they may say here's what we can do - don't be discouraged by those people above you, they're better actuaries than you but they have a crappy job because they can't communicate or sell like you can or maybe they tell you you should leave because they think you'd be a better fit at _____. That last option might not be pleasant, but twenty years later you may look back and say it was the best thing that could have happene.d
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  #66  
Old 02-11-2007, 10:39 AM
Danny Boy Danny Boy is offline
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Originally Posted by Excited to Begin View Post
Thanks everyone for the responses. I appreciate all the feedback regardless of how critical it is because I'm looking to find the true answers for my disillusionment. The reality is I have not passed exams for personal reasons I don't want to disclose (trust me they are legit). By no means am I super intelligent but I am an extremely bright math student (as are most people here). The main reason for concern is b/c I view success in my company less dependent on being actuarial and far more dependent on being a good consultant. The only benefit I can really see to passing exams is the raises they are worth (which is nothing to sneeze at) but not actual career development. I'm looking to be very successful and I guess I feel I need to sell business in order to get there. That being the case I question why i took this path at all and didn't go into a more business oriented field. Here I'm not capable of selling for a few years and I see it as a slow process. Maybe I just need to hang on and not get ahead of myself. Thanks again for the responses even if you think I'm a fool, blind and stupid. I'm really just looking for advice and help.

Wait, let me get this straight. You mean the actuarial career is not as enticing if you have to sell and compete in ways that you would have done by choosing another finance field? In other words, if you have to go through the same internal politics that other finance fields have to go through then insurance wouldn't be your first choice? And here I thought that everybody just loved to work in a field considered extremely boring by the outside world. I'm surprised to see that unless the exam system can bring rapid advancement and responsibilities then the best and brightest will not be attracted to the field.

(sorry Excited to Begin, these comments are directed at the ridiculous exam system revamp where many others will have an ASA that means practically nothing from a salary and responsibility advancement view)
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  #67  
Old 02-11-2007, 11:06 AM
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GosuJohn GosuJohn is offline
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Originally Posted by Excited to Begin View Post
The main reason for concern is b/c I view success in my company less dependent on being actuarial and far more dependent on being a good consultant. The only benefit I can really see to passing exams is the raises they are worth (which is nothing to sneeze at) but not actual career development. I'm looking to be very successful and I guess I feel I need to sell business in order to get there. That being the case I question why i took this path at all and didn't go into a more business oriented field.
This makes no sense. Your saying you have to have business skills in consulting to succeed, you dont like that so you want to go into a more business oriented field? All you will get is more politics, more hours, more selling and less math.
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  #68  
Old 02-11-2007, 11:09 AM
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GosuJohn GosuJohn is offline
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I'm surprised to see that unless the exam system can bring rapid advancement and responsibilities then the best and brightest will not be attracted to the field.
I agree with you of course, but here I think this a situation of the exam system keeping the dumb and lazy out.
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  #69  
Old 02-11-2007, 12:09 PM
Excited to Begin Excited to Begin is offline
 
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Originally Posted by GosuJohn View Post
This makes no sense. Your saying you have to have business skills in consulting to succeed, you dont like that so you want to go into a more business oriented field? All you will get is more politics, more hours, more selling and less math.
No. What I'm saying is I entered the field thinking passing exams will be the berometer for moving up fast and career development. I viewed the field as attractive b/c I'm a good math student with a desire to make good money. I've found that the good money doesn't come with the exams it comes with the business skills and selling. Being ambitious and wanting to "do well" I now realize I'm essentially in a business position but one with a slow learning curve, marginal pay increases and one that is somewhat pigeonholed from the perspective of the larger business world. With that said I question why I don't look for a different business/entrepeneurial role where I can see serious growth in 3-5 years. Is that available where I am now or will I be stuck with the 3% raises for the next 8 years?
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  #70  
Old 02-11-2007, 12:18 PM
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Ailing Factuary Ailing Factuary is offline
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Originally Posted by SirVLCIV View Post
But they also invest more time/money in their education.
oftentimes people graduating from the ivies and such that get good first year jobs out of law school get their tuition reimbursed by their new employer.
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