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  #1  
Old 01-03-2018, 05:20 PM
TDH TDH is offline
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Default Developing layered losses - which order?

If you had individual claims with AOC limits and excess, and aggregate limits and excess, at what point do you develop?

I thought it would be first:

1) Trend individual losses
2) Layer individual losses
3) aggregate by year
4) apply aggregate loss modifies
5) develop the losses in the layer

However, http://www.cii.co.uk/knowledge/resou...-process/43681

states at step 10, we apply aggregate modifiers after developing - I don't see the logic here. It seems as though the author is stating to only apply the individual modifiers then develop, then apply the aggregate. What's the reasoning?

Any help please

Last edited by TDH; 01-03-2018 at 05:43 PM..
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Old 01-04-2018, 12:11 AM
Harbinger Harbinger is offline
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Can you provide some background on what you’re pricing/analyzing?
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Old 01-04-2018, 06:11 AM
TDH TDH is offline
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a large account
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  #4  
Old 01-04-2018, 09:19 AM
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Maphisto's Sidekick Maphisto's Sidekick is offline
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The nice thing about mathematics is that you can do things in a different order, and arrive at the correct answer (or an approximately equally correct answer) provided the intermediate steps use information that is crafted with assumptions that are compatible with where you are in your overall process.

I've done quite a bit with large account pricing in property-casualty. I think I minimize my headaches by trending individual claims, dividing the individual claims into layers, aggregating the losses in the layers, and then developing the aggregations of the layers.

However, the development factors I apply have to themselves be created using trended, layered losses.

I prefer to do this because it neatly handles the questions of what to do about claims not yet reported, what to do about claims that develop into a higher layer, or claims that fall out of a layer when closing. The downside, however, is that if you are developing excess layer(s), the data can become so sparse as to requiring judgment in coming up with suitable development factors.

Oh, and when coming up with trend to apply to individual uncapped claims, keep in mind that some of the more popular industry trend metrics (at least in the US) are based on capped losses, and therefore some modification may be required before you use them.
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Old 01-04-2018, 01:39 PM
TDH TDH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maphisto's Sidekick View Post
The nice thing about mathematics is that you can do things in a different order, and arrive at the correct answer (or an approximately equally correct answer) provided the intermediate steps use information that is crafted with assumptions that are compatible with where you are in your overall process.

I've done quite a bit with large account pricing in property-casualty. I think I minimize my headaches by trending individual claims, dividing the individual claims into layers, aggregating the losses in the layers, and then developing the aggregations of the layers.

However, the development factors I apply have to themselves be created using trended, layered losses.

I prefer to do this because it neatly handles the questions of what to do about claims not yet reported, what to do about claims that develop into a higher layer, or claims that fall out of a layer when closing. The downside, however, is that if you are developing excess layer(s), the data can become so sparse as to requiring judgment in coming up with suitable development factors.

Oh, and when coming up with trend to apply to individual uncapped claims, keep in mind that some of the more popular industry trend metrics (at least in the US) are based on capped losses, and therefore some modification may be required before you use them.
Thanks for this.

The data I have right now is fairly sparse. The only triangle I have is for the line of business, rather than the specific risk. I'll see if I can more data, else I'll go with what I have for now.

Thanks again.
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Old 01-05-2018, 01:11 PM
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Maphisto's Sidekick Maphisto's Sidekick is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TDH View Post
Thanks for this.

The data I have right now is fairly sparse. The only triangle I have is for the line of business, rather than the specific risk.
That's not uncommon.

If you have the time and data, and depending on what it is that you're looking at, a few more points to consider:
  • For accounts with large retentions, the delay in getting the notice of loss to the carrier is probably more dependent on the account (and/or its TPA), but once on the books, the carrier's reserving practices may not be that different from other similarly mature claims.
  • There was a paper recently that discussed techniques of credibility-weighting thin loss development data. (Don't have the details off the top of my head, unfortunately.) It's not something that's proven worth the effort with the kinds of accounts I typically look at, but for something huge....
  • Try to sensitivity-test assumptions or judgment calls you make. That will give you a taste for how material your choice of selection might be, as well as providing some insight as to how much you want to load your indication for parameter risk.
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