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  #1  
Old 07-29-2013, 03:38 PM
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Default Chess in the news

http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/217300301.html

Quote:
Mass. girl, 9, becomes youngest US chess expert and is on track to break other records

  • <LI class=first>Article by: GRANT WELKER , The Sun
  • Updated: July 28, 2013 - 6:55 PM
CHELMSFORD, Mass. — Only three years or so since first picking up the game of chess, 9-year-old Carissa Yip can already look down at 93 percent of the more than 51,000 players registered with the U.S. Chess Federation.

She has risen so far up the rankings that she has reached the expert level at a younger age than anyone since the chess federation began electronic record-keeping in 1991, a new level she reached in recent weeks.

Her father, Percy, who taught her until she began beating him within a year, said she could reach master level in as soon as a year.

"Some never reach master level," he said. "From expert to master, it's a huge jump."

But Carissa, who will be a fifth-grader at McCarthy Middle School this fall, has improved by leaps and bounds.

She first played competitively at the MetroWest Chess Club and Wachusett Chess Club, at the latter of which she's the top-ranked player. Last fall, she competed in an international competition in Slovenia, and in December, she'll play the World Youth Championships in the United Arab Emirates.

Carissa is hesitant when asked about her accomplishments, saying she doesn't spend much time thinking about them.

But she also set a goal for herself this year to reach 2,100; an expert is anyone over 2,000. Anyone at 2,200 is a master. She also wants to one day become the first female to win the overall championship — not just in the female category, her father said.

"It's not like the rating matters," Carissa said.

She later demonstrated her ability by playing with her back to the board, reading her moves to her father and keeping track of the whole board in her head. She has been called an intimidating player in an ironic way, because she's far short of even 5 feet tall.

Her U.S. Chess Federation ranking places her in the top 7 percent of all players registered with the group and the top 2 percent of female players.

Closer to home, Carissa has impressed others who have been playing chess for far longer than she has been alive.

"This was not a record she won by a few days," said Nathan Smolensky, the president of the Massachusetts Chess Association. "It was a significant margin. So it's very impressive."

Among other younger stars at the Boylston Chess Club in Somerville, where Yip has played, most are in their teens and are boys, Smolensky said.

"Even they say they were nowhere near this strength when they were that young," he said.

Carissa also has three years to reach the next level, that of master, in time to set the record for youngest to reach that step as well, Smolensky said. Five-time U.S. women's winner Irina Krush has the record for becoming a master at age 12.

George Mirijanian, program director for the Wachusett club and past president of the Massachusetts Chess Association, said Carissa and Percy Yip, both Wachusett members, both got a standing ovation when they arrived at the club last week after Carissa reached expert level.

"In my more than 50 years with the club, I had never witnessed such an exuberant outburst from club members," Mirijanian said. "They are really proud of Carissa and what she has accomplished."
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  #2  
Old 08-05-2013, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by 1695814 View Post
Really impressive, but just fyi, she broke the record for youngest FEMALE to make 2000. And the record they mention in the article for youngest master at 12 years old is again the youngest FEMALE 2200.

The actual records, as far as I can tell, are both held by Awonder Liang. He was almost exactly 8 years old when he made 2000 and just under 10 years old for 2200.

https://www.uschess.org/content/view/12140/704/
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  #3  
Old 11-13-2013, 06:23 PM
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Don't know why this was in the "Opinion" section of last Sunday's StarTribune, but here you go:

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/c...231223581.html

Quote:
In chess, a child can win (and will)
Article by: Dennis J. McGrath
Star Tribune
November 10, 2013 - 9:08 AM
Dan Dillon is an extremely strong chess player. Let’s get that straight right from the start.

If you’re a casual player who has never played in a tournament, he’d crush you. Even among serious players — those who compete in tournaments — his chess rating puts him among the top 7 percent in the country.

Yet it wasn’t shocking when Dillon, who has been playing competitively for more than 40 years, was checkmated at a recent Twin Cities Chess League event by an 8-year-old girl.

Chess is a game of infinite complexity and mystery, a gift from sixth-century India that has taxed the calculating skills of the greatest minds of all time and has even held out against supercomputers.

It’s a game that we “patzers” will never truly comprehend.

And yet, as Dan Dillon accepted his fate with laughter, and as the 4-foot-tall Nastassja Matus gathered up the pieces after her victory, the ultimate truth of the game had once again revealed itself.

Chess is the great equalizer.

Age, experience, gender, size, strength, education, SAT scores, income — all the things that define and separate us — count for nothing when two players sit across a board with 64 squares.

Nastassja, a third-grader from Plymouth, is only now learning about fractions, yet she demonstrates an uncommon talent and intuitive understanding of the game of kings. Only a little more than a year since she played in her first rated tournament, she is punishing subtle errors of highly rated players.

In August, she took the silver medal in an international competition in Toronto for girls under 8, and in December, she’ll be traveling to the United Arab Emirates to represent the United States in the World Youth Chess Championship.

The game is rife with these “chess punks,” as the manager of the Chess Castle of Minnesota has dubbed them with jealous respect. Kids who arrive at the board with a chess clock in one hand and a stuffed animal in the other strike fear in the minds of veteran players. The two opponents may have similar ratings, but the chess punks usually are improving so rapidly that even big leaps in their rating fail to catch up with and reflect their true ability. Though the adult would dominate in any other head-to-head competition involving mental or physical agility, it’s often the kid who has the edge in chess.

For more proof, consider Andrew Tang of Plymouth. He won this year’s annual club championship at the Castle, the strongest chess club in the state, despite being only 13. It was no fluke. He’d won it the year before, too.

And earlier this year in neighboring Wisconsin, a 9-year-old from Madison achieved a rating of master — the youngest ever to do so in the United States. It’s a title that fewer than 2 percent of U.S. tournament players ever reach. His name, appropriately, is Awonder Liang.

As Dan Dillon, of Minneapolis, says, and as every chess player knows, “There’s no shame in losing to a prodigy.”

This weekend, as a new World Championship match begins, it’s the prodigy who is the betting favorite to win. Norway’s Magnus Carlsen set a new age record when he became a grandmaster — the highest title in chess — at the tender age of 13. Now 22, he will try to wrest the world championship from 43-year-old Indian GM Viswanathan Anand, a five-time champion.

Age differences among players may be the most glaring disparity at tournaments, but it’s not just age where the distinctions between players become inconsequential.

Though chess remains male-dominated, Hungarian grandmaster Judit Polgar claimed her place among the chess elite with a ranking of eighth-best in the world a few years ago, proving that it may not be long before a woman vies for the world title.

And here in Minnesota, the white Scandinavian heritage is but one ingredient in the true melting pot that’s the chess community in this state. When the pairings were posted for each round of the Minnesota Open in February, the lists contained no shortage of names like Diaz and Sanchez, Xiong and Qu, Ravi and Amarasinghe.

The field included a 40-year-old black doctor from Duluth, a 65-year-old Russian immigrant who settled in Burnsville, a black teen from St. Paul and another from north Minneapolis who recently won his division at a national scholastic tournament.

And every Thursday night at the Castle in northeast Minneapolis, a couple dozen players chat amiably before they get down to the business of trying to destroy each other’s best ideas. It’s a gathering that cuts across socioeconomic lines and one that you would be hard-pressed to find in any other room anywhere in the state. The weekly Thursday Knighter counts among its regulars a taxi driver, a retired CEO who has sat on the boards of U.S. Bank and Target, a merchant Marine sailor (when he’s on shore leave), a retired postal worker, a journalist, a 20-year-old enrolled in a work skills program, a van driver at a park-and-fly lot and the owner of a small window washing business.

The Thursday Knighter, by the way, is a refuge for those of us who have been pushing pieces for years but still can’t memorize more than a handful of moves of the main lines in the Nimzo-Indian opening. The games can run longer than four hours, pushing the endgames close to midnight and thus ridding the competition of many of the strongest players in the state.

They’re fast asleep — having already been read their bedtime stories.

Dennis J. McGrath is a regular at the Thursday Knighter at the Castle. He is the Star Tribune’s deputy digital editor.
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Old 11-13-2013, 06:50 PM
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I don't think horse racing enthusiasts would take kindly to people calling chess the game of kings.
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Old 11-14-2013, 10:25 AM
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Just a nitpick, but "Norway’s Magnus Carlsen set a new age record when he became a grandmaster — the highest title in chess — at the tender age of 13" is not true. Karjakin had the record at the time, and still has it.
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Old 11-15-2013, 09:40 AM
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I don't think horse racing enthusiasts would take kindly to people calling chess the game of kings.
I don't think 98% of the world cares what horse race enthusiasts think.
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Old 12-04-2013, 05:00 PM
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I don't think horse racing enthusiasts would take kindly to people calling chess the game of kings.
Isn't horse racing the sport of kings?
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Old 02-05-2014, 03:50 PM
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Obituary for Curt Brasket, Chess master & Computer Programmer:

http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...33#post7257333
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Old 12-12-2014, 04:25 PM
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http://www.wsj.com/articles/chess-yi...E_Video_second

Chess Yields to the Young


Quote:
Chess Yields to the Young

World-chess championships’ rigorous schedule favors younger competitors

Modern matches are much more rigorous.

By Christopher Chabris

Dec. 12, 2014 2:23 p.m. ET
The ancient game of chess, long associated with old men sitting on park benches, is increasingly a sport for the young.

The latest exemplar of this trend is 24-year-old Magnus Carlsen of Norway, who defended his title as world chess champion in a match in Sochi, Russia last month. He defeated 45-year-old Viswanathan Anand of India, the former champion whom he had dispatched a year ago to win the crown.

In elite chess, Mr. Anand is an anachronism of sorts. After losing his title last year, he had to enter a 14-round tournament to win the right to a rematch. Most chess pundits predicted that he wouldn’t even try; when he tried, none predicted that he would win. He nevertheless cruised by the younger field, though he ultimately lost to Mr. Carlsen by 6-4.

For over 50 years, every new world champion has been younger than the champion he dethroned—with the sole exception of Mr. Anand, who was five years older than the Russian player Vladimir Kramnik when he took the title from him in 2007. No other challenger has beaten a younger champion.

Mr. Carlsen’s eventual successor is likely to be one of the top younger players. Fabiano Caruana, age 22 and ranked No. 2 in the world, is the leading candidate. (He was born and learned chess in the U.S. but now plays for Italy.) Other highly ranked young hopefuls include Anish Giri of the Netherlands, Wesley So of the U.S., and Yu Yangyi of China—each just 20 or 21 years old.

What accounts for this youthful flourishing? First, modern tournament and match schedules are more rigorous. In 1985, the world championship match had three games a week for a leisurely eight weeks. These days, the entire match is finished in little more than two weeks—a comparative sprint. A second factor is the explosive growth in the amount of chess information available online and in the capacity of computers to spot errors and suggest better opening moves. This enables younger players who train conscientiously to reach elite status even faster than state-supported Soviet prodigies could 30 years ago.

Finally, today’s faster-paced game stresses memorizing, visualizing and precisely calculating sequences of moves, as opposed to thinking in general conceptual terms. This requires the kind of “fluid intelligence”—the ability to juggle abstract logical relations without error—that peaks in one’s 20s and starts to decline after that. Mr. Carlsen may be the future of chess, but it is Mr. Anand’s past feats that may never be duplicated.
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Old 12-15-2014, 03:21 PM
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Chess is a game of infinite complexity and mystery, a gift from sixth-century India that has taxed the calculating skills of the greatest minds of all time and has even held out against supercomputers.
wat
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