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Probability Old Exam P Forum

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  #1  
Old 11-16-2018, 04:41 AM
Evan_Actuarial Evan_Actuarial is offline
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Default Please Any Input

I am struggling with the times soa exam p module the soa offers.... I cannot seem to score above a 14 on any one practice test and they are tricky in my opinion. Any thoughts of advice? Should I just keep drilling the problems until I become more comfortable I;ve been studying on and off for around 2 months. I have a lot of experience with probability classes in general.. However, on practice tests I struggle for some reason....
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  #2  
Old 11-16-2018, 10:08 AM
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PeppermintPatty PeppermintPatty is offline
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My input is that the exams get harder, and if you are struggling this much with exam P, you will probably be happier if you find some other line of work.

You might want to try one of the other ones to see if maybe your problem is specific to this material. Or try to find an actuary who had good exam success who can tutor you and see what your specific hang-ups might be.

But especially if you already know the material well, and are still struggling, you may be setting yourself up for a lot of misery.
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Old 11-16-2018, 10:38 AM
dabears32 dabears32 is offline
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I always found it much easier to focus on the real tests and only used the practice tests to get exposure to problems. Don't give up yet. Plenty of people fail their first test(s). Just keep practicing.
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  #4  
Old 11-16-2018, 10:53 AM
Westley Westley is offline
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PP (like me) is far removed from the exam process, so take it with a grain of salt, but I agree with her advice.

I have also seen people that struggled with the first one or two and then hit their stride and blew through exams, but wouldn't want to hang too much on the assumption that you'll do that.
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:01 AM
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I also have seen a coworker struggle with P/FM and now she is an ASA manager at my company. Once you get used to the exam process it gets easier.
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  #6  
Old 11-16-2018, 11:02 AM
alwaysseamus alwaysseamus is offline
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Dude, sign up for ADAPT/Coaching Actuaries. Their P module is very accurate for assessing where you stand.

Sometimes practice problems put out by the SOA are overly tricky. Of course, being able to do those is good, but necessarily a good barometer for where you stand in potential for passing the exam. I found my actual exam P to be quite difficult. I'm guessing that's because I wasn't really familiar with the whole process at that point. I didn't find the exam material super challenging, but the time constraint of the actual test was tough. I was lucky to pass that exam on my first try, and the subsequent next 3 exams as well. I found FM and MFE to be fairly easy, and recently I took C, and that I found to be quite challenging.)

Again, sign up for ADAPT/Coaching Actuaries, and come back to us after a couple of weeks of hardcore practice.
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeppermintPatty View Post
My input is that the exams get harder, and if you are struggling this much with exam P, you will probably be happier if you find some other line of work.

You might want to try one of the other ones to see if maybe your problem is specific to this material. Or try to find an actuary who had good exam success who can tutor you and see what your specific hang-ups might be.

But especially if you already know the material well, and are still struggling, you may be setting yourself up for a lot of misery.
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Old 11-16-2018, 12:31 PM
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Make it your life mission to pass ONE of these exams. Once you get there, take an assessment of the amount of time/energy that was required to get the pass. Determine whether or not you want to deal with that for the next 8-10 years.

You will find anecdotal stories that support/not-support your ultimate decision, so by and large they are meaningless.
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Last edited by JollyRancher; 11-16-2018 at 01:10 PM..
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  #9  
Old 11-16-2018, 04:15 PM
itGetsBetter itGetsBetter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan_Actuarial View Post
I am struggling with the times soa exam p module the soa offers.... I cannot seem to score above a 14 on any one practice test and they are tricky in my opinion. Any thoughts of advice? Should I just keep drilling the problems until I become more comfortable I;ve been studying on and off for around 2 months. I have a lot of experience with probability classes in general.. However, on practice tests I struggle for some reason....
2 months seems kind of short. A rule of thumb is 100 quality study hours per hour of exam. I would recommend leveraging your probability classes and getting to know first principles intimately. While those don't make you fast, they can help with catching tricks and confidently answering correctly.
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  #10  
Old 11-16-2018, 04:33 PM
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Lorenzo Von Matterhorn Lorenzo Von Matterhorn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itGetsBetter View Post
2 months seems kind of short. A rule of thumb is 100 quality study hours per hour of exam.
This is the main issue here. I won't sit here and tell you to find a new line of work - I failed my first exam and have been doing just fine since.

Not only is 2 months short, but 2 months "off and on" is barely scratching the surface. Sure, there are some people who don't need to hit the books too hard for the first exam, but I know I studied hard prior to passing my first exam. I think I took about 3 months of consistent studying before feeling comfortable.

Everyone is different with these things. But I would venture to guess that you need to really buckle down and make studying a priority rather than something you do off and on. If you cant study consistently for months at a time, then I agree with prior posts - find a new line of work.
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