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  #1  
Old 01-31-2019, 06:45 AM
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Default If you want to grow at a job, make sure you are doing hard things 70% of the time

Friend of mine on LI posted this. Comments on this?

I have always suspected this, but I am surprised at the number (70%? Seems a bit high)

Link to article:

Quote:
Confirmed That If You're Not Outside Your Comfort Zone, You're Not Learning

Stability shuts down your brain's learning centers, new Yale research shows


https://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman...edictable.html
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Old 01-31-2019, 08:18 AM
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The 70% comes from a different article, and it's a rule of thumb from Auren Hoffman (I've not heard of him, or any of the companies he's started, but he seems to have made a lot of money so must be doing something right) - but I'd still take that number with a pinch of salt.

So the science is basically saying, once you know how something works, you stop learning about it - which is decidedly in the water is wet category. That said, from a work perspective, it's a decent reminder that to challenge yourself and progress you need to keep taking on new stuff.
I've always had that kind of mindset - once I learn a new task, I can manage one full cycle of doing it properly and then I'm wanting to do something else. It's actually quite hard to do in the actuarial world, as we seem to value "experience" as in "knowing how the process works" rather than "having done a load of stuff".
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Old 01-31-2019, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by GargoyleWaiting View Post
The 70% comes from a different article, and it's a rule of thumb from Auren Hoffman (I've not heard of him, or any of the companies he's started, but he seems to have made a lot of money so must be doing something right) - but I'd still take that number with a pinch of salt.

So the science is basically saying, once you know how something works, you stop learning about it - which is decidedly in the water is wet category. That said, from a work perspective, it's a decent reminder that to challenge yourself and progress you need to keep taking on new stuff.
I've always had that kind of mindset - once I learn a new task, I can manage one full cycle of doing it properly and then I'm wanting to do something else. It's actually quite hard to do in the actuarial world, as we seem to value "experience" as in "knowing how the process works" rather than "having done a load of stuff".
Yes, I have noticed this as well in the actuarial world. I value versatility when it comes to work. You need to be able to pick up a piece of work you have never seen before then: study it, research the problem, design a solution, test it, then help to implement it. But in the insurance world, there are very few opportunities to really do this if you dont have experience with said work.
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Old 01-31-2019, 11:02 AM
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Congrats captain obvious
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Old 01-31-2019, 11:46 AM
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In any non-consulting setting, its very difficult to keep learning new things as there aren't many opportunities for new exposure.
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Old 01-31-2019, 12:28 PM
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In the po', 70% is way too high.
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Old 01-31-2019, 12:52 PM
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In the po', 70% is way too high.


Although, if "hard things" includes projects where you have to pull an answer out of your rear end because you have nowhere even close to enough data to do a thorough analysis, 70% could conceivably be too low in the 'po.
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Old 01-31-2019, 12:56 PM
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More efficient to make others believe your job is doing hard things than actually doing hard things.

120% of my job is doing hard things, according to my last tally.
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Old 01-31-2019, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by manaknight14 View Post


Although, if "hard things" includes projects where you have to pull an answer out of your rear end because you have nowhere even close to enough data to do a thorough analysis, 70% could conceivably be too low in the 'po.
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Old 01-31-2019, 02:33 PM
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In any non-consulting setting, its very difficult to keep learning new things as there aren't many opportunities for new exposure.
N = 1 opinion incoming.


Depends on your company/manager. I've definitely been exposed to DS/CS types of projects that would not fall into the category of "actuarial tings".

As an actuary it was definitely not 70% of the time, probably like 25-40%.
As a Data Scientist, it is most of the time (50% +).

Last edited by Fracktuary; 01-31-2019 at 02:46 PM..
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