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  #21  
Old 12-12-2018, 04:22 PM
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You may be remembering it right, but what you are remembering is the payment date, not the accrual date. This causes endless confusion. Because the August benefit is PAID in September, some people refer to it as the September payment. But it's really the August benefit, paid in September.

Only about 3% of people can possibly receive a benefit at exact age 62, because almost everyone attains age 62 in the middle of a month. If you were correct -- and I am certain you aren't -- then everyone could receive a benefit at age 62, but it would be delayed a month. That's not how the program operates.

Bruce
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Old 12-12-2018, 04:43 PM
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Bruce's info (no surprise here) is right according to the SSA calculator.

https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/quickcalc/early_late.html

If I put in a birthday of 8/6/1949, and say that I want to start receiving benefits for the month of 8/2019 where it asks
Quote:
Enter the effective month and year for which you would like to begin receiving benefits:
It says
Quote:
You choose to receive benefits 48 months after you reach your normal retirement age. Your benefit will be 132 percent of your primary insurance amount.
If instead I say I want to start receiving benefits beginning for the month of 9/2019 it says
Quote:
You choose to receive benefits 49 months after you reach your normal retirement age. However, because delayed retirement credits do not apply after age 70, your benefit will be increased only for 48 months of delayed retirement. Your benefit will be 132 percent of your primary insurance amount.
No statement from them about how stupid that would be and if they would automatically pay a benefit for 8/2019. I will not find out what they would do by trying it and seeing what happens.

Last edited by Steve White; 12-12-2018 at 04:47 PM..
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  #23  
Old 12-12-2018, 05:34 PM
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and thanks, twig, for calling my attention to that calculator. It always helps to be able to play with alternative scenarios, including seeing that it translates as expected to an actual birthday instead of a hypothetical one.
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Old 12-12-2018, 05:40 PM
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So as someone with a birthday on the first of the month, I can receive dollars in my bank account the second week of the month after which my 62nd birthday falls? Is that correct?
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Old 12-12-2018, 05:43 PM
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Let's say you were born on August 1, 1957. Your 62nd birthday would be on August 1, 2019. By standard government rules, you would attain age 62 on July 31, 2019. So in August 2019, you would be age 62 years and 1 month and be eligible for the entire month (presuming that you didn't die during the month). If you applied for benefits then, you would receive your August benefit on the 2nd Wednesday in September.

Bruce
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  #26  
Old 12-12-2018, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve White View Post
Bruce's info (no surprise here) is right according to the SSA calculator.

https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/quickcalc/early_late.html

If I put in a birthday of 8/6/1949, and say that I want to start receiving benefits for the month of 8/2019 where it asks

It says

If instead I say I want to start receiving benefits beginning for the month of 9/2019 it says No statement from them about how stupid that would be and if they would automatically pay a benefit for 8/2019. I will not find out what they would do by trying it and seeing what happens.
Thanks for clearing that up.
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  #27  
Old 12-12-2018, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve White View Post
Bruce's info (no surprise here) is right according to the SSA calculator.

https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/quickcalc/early_late.html

If I put in a birthday of 8/6/1949, and say that I want to start receiving benefits for the month of 8/2019 where it asks

It says

If instead I say I want to start receiving benefits beginning for the month of 9/2019 it says No statement from them about how stupid that would be and if they would automatically pay a benefit for 8/2019. I will not find out what they would do by trying it and seeing what happens.
This is not a calculator that I've played around with before today.

It disagrees with what used to be on the anypia calculator. (Still not sure what's currently on anypia) If you put in a date that is on the 2nd of the month, anypia would give you 100% of the benefit on your SSNRA month, and also 100% credit 1 month later.

Any birthdate not the 2nd of the month, delaying 1 month gives you extra benefits. And my 2007 read of the relevant laws supported this because the early/late calculation says that you weren't 67 (or whatever your SSNRA is) for the entire month, but the SSNRA calculation says that you were. And because the two disagreed, people born on the 2nd of the month lost a month of credit if they claimed any time other than their SSNRA. If you took the benefit one month before SSNRA, they discounted you 2 months instead of 1.

I very clearly recall having to write this glitch into our calculator because we initially excluded it and bumped *everyone's* benefits up or down the exact number of months before/since SSNRA, but we had to put in the glitch about people born on the 2nd of the month. Our first batch of test cases didn't have anyone born on the 2nd and the calculator passed all of our tests, but then we later added a test case of someone born on the 2nd of the month and suddenly it was failing the anypia calculation that we'd passed months earlier... because we hadn't written the glitch in at that point.

So I'm now intrigued by the fact that *this* calculator doesn't have that glitch... which I'd assumed was actually part of Social Security law. Can't wait to dig into the anypia calculator to see what it says. Remain fascinated by this.

Too bad I don't still have the computer I had in 2007 as I'd downloaded the then-current anypia calculator onto it. I probably still have some of the paperwork saved somewhere, but it'd be a nightmare to find it.
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Last edited by twig93; 12-12-2018 at 06:24 PM..
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  #28  
Old 12-12-2018, 06:26 PM
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It doesn't really matter what you were looking at in 2007. It's just creating confusion. My description of the law is perfectly accurate, and the law hasn't changed in that particular area since the early 1980s.

Bruce
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Old 12-12-2018, 06:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bdschobel View Post
It doesn't really matter what you were looking at in 2007. It's just creating confusion. My description of the law is perfectly accurate, and the law hasn't changed in that particular area since the early 1980s.

Bruce
Well it matters to people born on the 2nd of the month... and it matters if my former employer is systematically under-estimating the Social Security benefits for ~12/365ths of their customers.
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  #30  
Old 12-12-2018, 06:40 PM
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People born on the 2nd of the month attain their age on the 1st -- and are the only group that can receive benefits at exact age 62. Everyone else has to wait until at least age 62 years and 1 month. People born on the 2nd who wait a month to claim benefits get the appropriate increase (one fewer month of delayed-retirement reduction). Why would you believe that people born on the 2nd get cheated somehow? Surely, Social Security wouldn't do such a thing.

Bruce
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