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  #81  
Old 07-17-2018, 02:22 PM
Master_of_my_domain Master_of_my_domain is offline
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I've done a few quizzes (through annuities section) but also I haven't done too many because I don't want to go through the ADAPT questions now and then when I am actually practicing the 45 days before the exam, I don't want to see the same ADAPT questions over and over again. Maybe that's a little silly but I've always amped up on ADAPT about 4-6 weeks before exam date.
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  #82  
Old 07-17-2018, 02:23 PM
zenkei18 zenkei18 is offline
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Originally Posted by Liar View Post
Have you done ADAPT quizzes? I do 10-question quizzes after each section.
I'm on premiums right now.

So far, there wasn't a single problem I didn't know how to solve. I make a silly calculation mistake on my quizzes and end up with a 9, but I at least know how to solve every problem.

Now, my ASM and TIA friends & coworkers on the other hand...

We decided to study together once and I was a bit afraid when I saw them solve problems in ways I haven't seen, but every single time, they say "Wait, was it this formula or that formula"?
I got all the questions right in our get together sessions, while they got almost everything wrong.
I feel really sorry for you.
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  #83  
Old 07-17-2018, 02:25 PM
Liar Liar is offline
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Originally Posted by zenkei18 View Post
I feel really sorry for you.
Because?
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  #84  
Old 07-17-2018, 09:00 PM
NchooseK NchooseK is offline
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Originally Posted by Liar View Post
I don't agree with NChooseK.

For LTAM, at least, coachingactuaries is the best for "weaker" students, since they don't go into as much detail as the other study materials.

You must derive everything from first principal's if you use CA, but if you use something like TIA, you would just remember shortcuts.

For example, for percentile annuities and insurance, TIA gave a wishy-washy derivation and gave the u / (u+ d) formula for constant force, while CA expects you to derive Pr(T > h) from first principals.

TIA and ASM are good if you are able to make mathematical logical jumps given missing details, while CA is good if you're not as smart and can't see the answer immediately, and so you need first principals to solve everything.
I don't have experience with TIA. If TIA is videos, I wouldn't use it because I learn best from reading. I have heard good things about TIA and I assume it is a very good product.

When I do practice problems that aren't slam-dunk easy for me, I like to solve using every possible method, whether I'm using ASM or CA.

I am not sure I agree that first principles are necessarily easiest or "dumbest." In an exam environment, I will use whatever is quickest. Sometimes it is first principles, sometimes it is a shortcut, sometimes I draw from my "mathematical toolkit" and sometimes I employ a combination or something else. I am having a hard time understanding why first principles is the dumbest/worst/etc. method.

CA is also not just first principles.

ASM gives you examples for every single type of problem. ASM is sort of like doing problems 1-31 odd for homework. For each type of problem, you will cover almost every way it can be presented. CA may give you one variation of a problem, then expects you to handle a completely different problem drawing from mathematical knowledge and applying the same concepts as the other problem in SOME but not all aspects of the current problem. You use discretion. You have to think.

CA is doesn't give you the same amount of practice as ASM, so CA is designed for someone with more command of the material. We are preparing for an exam, not preparing to do end-of-chapter exercises. CA's exercises are easier, yes. But you need to be able to do the simpler exercise as practice, then do more difficult examples in ADAPT or on an exam. If the exercises were homework, yes, ASM is far more difficult. Yes, ASM will go into more depth, and in-depth exercises are more difficult.

Say you are 33 like I am. You were really good at differential equations and found it easy at the time. However, you took diffEQ when you were 20, and you don't remember absolutely everything. You are still an expert in Diff EQ, but you need to brush up. Do you read ASM or browse CA? Do a few problems in each chapter and you should be fine. No need to go in depth if a few problems with more overall coverage rekindles your memory.
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  #85  
Old 07-17-2018, 09:51 PM
Liar Liar is offline
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Originally Posted by NchooseK View Post
I don't have experience with TIA. If TIA is videos, I wouldn't use it because I learn best from reading. I have heard good things about TIA and I assume it is a very good product.

When I do practice problems that aren't slam-dunk easy for me, I like to solve using every possible method, whether I'm using ASM or CA.

I am not sure I agree that first principles are necessarily easiest or "dumbest." In an exam environment, I will use whatever is quickest. Sometimes it is first principles, sometimes it is a shortcut, sometimes I draw from my "mathematical toolkit" and sometimes I employ a combination or something else. I am having a hard time understanding why first principles is the dumbest/worst/etc. method.

CA is also not just first principles.

ASM gives you examples for every single type of problem. ASM is sort of like doing problems 1-31 odd for homework. For each type of problem, you will cover almost every way it can be presented. CA may give you one variation of a problem, then expects you to handle a completely different problem drawing from mathematical knowledge and applying the same concepts as the other problem in SOME but not all aspects of the current problem. You use discretion. You have to think.

CA is doesn't give you the same amount of practice as ASM, so CA is designed for someone with more command of the material. We are preparing for an exam, not preparing to do end-of-chapter exercises. CA's exercises are easier, yes. But you need to be able to do the simpler exercise as practice, then do more difficult examples in ADAPT or on an exam. If the exercises were homework, yes, ASM is far more difficult. Yes, ASM will go into more depth, and in-depth exercises are more difficult.

Say you are 33 like I am. You were really good at differential equations and found it easy at the time. However, you took diffEQ when you were 20, and you don't remember absolutely everything. You are still an expert in Diff EQ, but you need to brush up. Do you read ASM or browse CA? Do a few problems in each chapter and you should be fine. No need to go in depth if a few problems with more overall coverage rekindles your memory.
I think you're exaggerating the difficulty of the problems on level 1-5 ADAPT, which is what you should be using to review after each section.

Yes, the problems are slightly different from end of video problems, but I had no trouble with any of them except for slight calculation errors every 10 problems or so.
You just have to think a bit.

I only scored a 450 on the SAT Math section and only got up to algebra, so I don't know why someone from Swarthmore can't do it.

Last edited by Liar; 07-17-2018 at 09:54 PM..
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  #86  
Old 07-17-2018, 11:52 PM
NchooseK NchooseK is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liar View Post
I think you're exaggerating the difficulty of the problems on level 1-5 ADAPT, which is what you should be using to review after each section.

Yes, the problems are slightly different from end of video problems, but I had no trouble with any of them except for slight calculation errors every 10 problems or so.
You just have to think a bit.

I only scored a 450 on the SAT Math section and only got up to algebra, so I don't know why someone from Swarthmore can't do it.
Never said they were hard problems for me. I was making a comparison. And 1-5 ADAPT is boring lol. Crank it up! But you are right--ADAPT 1-5 is exam appropriate.
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  #87  
Old 07-18-2018, 05:54 AM
AlBuloushi AlBuloushi is offline
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How heavy is the calculus in this exam as compared to the other prelims? I've noticed that on the actual exams that i've taken, I have barely used any integration to solve the majority of questions. Is this exam any different?
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  #88  
Old 07-18-2018, 10:05 AM
Liar Liar is offline
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Integration will be mostly on e^x.

So far, the most challenging part of the material is getting used to the symbols and notation.
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  #89  
Old 07-18-2018, 12:49 PM
NchooseK NchooseK is offline
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Originally Posted by Liar View Post
So far, the most challenging part of the material is getting used to the symbols and notation.
That is 100% true, now. Get comfortable writing it! Second nature
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  #90  
Old 07-18-2018, 01:21 PM
NchooseK NchooseK is offline
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Originally Posted by AlBuloushi View Post
How heavy is the calculus in this exam as compared to the other prelims? I've noticed that on the actual exams that i've taken, I have barely used any integration to solve the majority of questions. Is this exam any different?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liar View Post
Integration will be mostly on e^x.
1) Memorize the integral of xe^-x.

2) And know the geometric series well.

3) If this needs to be said, be comfortable with the laws of exponents.

4) If you see a tough integral, there is probably a better way to do it.

5) They go easy on the Calculus. No limits, time-consuming integrals, I can't recall any derivatives. No trig, no surface-area integrals. The only double integrals will look like this: int(from 0 to inf) of e^(-int from 0 to t of likely a constant). Also double integrals in the Markov Chain section. Markov chains can get messy, so perform each integral on one line. You will see. They are very easy individually if you avoid the clunkiness.

6) Again if this needs to be said, remember to switch the sign of the inequality when mult/dividing by a negative number. You will be taking a ton of natural logs of positive numbers less than 1, which are obviously negative. Can kinda get screwy with tons of minus signs.

7) Spare yourself the Calculus and read Makeham's Law at the bottom of the new set of tables.

8) The new topic on Long-Term Insurance Coverage has some messing around with integral limits, but it is straightforward.

9) Know the following integral with respect to t: x^t.

10) mu_x+t = f_t(x)/S_t(x)

This forum needs native LaTeX.

You'll do great!
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