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  #51  
Old 12-13-2016, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
How about:
1. Burden on candidate with a lot of competition to wow.
2. Burden on employer to wow when interviewing top candidates.
3. Might be some above-average candidates where candidate and employer both should be wow'ing.
This street goes both directions. Stronger candidates with options are going to pick the option that stood out to them most.

I once worked with an HR recruiter that had some sort of god complex and played games with things like expected salary, kept moving the goalpost, kept me in the dark until the last minute. I eventually spoke up about it and got a scathing e-mail.

That might work for dealing with the 500 applicants to your EL marketing position, but you can't offend experienced local actuaries and just move on. Not easily, anyway.
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  #52  
Old 12-13-2016, 09:46 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
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Yeah, I'm thinking EL only about this.

For experienced positions, should see 2-way wowing.
3-way wowing would probably result in a call to HR.
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Last edited by Dr T Non-Fan; 12-14-2016 at 02:43 PM..
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  #53  
Old 12-14-2016, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Yeah, I'm thinking EL only about this.

For experienced positions should see 2-way wowing.
3-way wowing would probably result in a call to HR.


fwiw, when it comes to interviewing, I'm usually the one trying to sell the position to the candidate (but also give them a realistic view of what their job would involve).

That's because I'm not the hiring manager, so I won't be the ultimate decision-maker. I do provide input, but it's not like my input is key on the hiring decision.

However, I can be more influential in selling the position, because many of the people interviewed, whatever position, have more options than what we have.
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  #54  
Old 12-14-2016, 11:00 AM
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The people who really set themselves apart (for me, anyway) are the ones who ask good questions. And they don't have to be "fancy" questions. Like, you can tell certain candidates who are trying too hard, and they're hoping to impress with a question like, "So, what did you think about your level of reserves at end of FY2015?"

No, the people who impress me are the ones who want to really know what a day in the life is like in my office.
I'd say the actual questions asked mean less to me than the mentality behind them.

I go into a short 30 minute interview with an EL candidate, and there are two things I absolutely need to be convinced of to give my thumbs up to a potential offer:

1) Is this person going to be engaged? If they have a question, will they try to figure out the answer, or will they sit there twiddling their thumbs until I spoon feed them the answer? I learned 90% of what I know from researching and figuring things out on my own and only asking senior colleagues when I hit a brick wall, and I expect the same level of independence from my junior colleagues. Many of my questions are geared towards figuring this out about the person (give me an example of a situation where you had to learn a new piece of software for a class - how did you go about doing this? is one of my go-tos).

This is also where questions are important - if the questions are completely irrelevant to the conversation we're having, that's a red flag to me.

2) Is this person going to be someone personable that I can work with? I would say less than 15% of candidates I've interviewed with have failed this test (mostly because the person who phone screens before we bring in EL candidates for interviews is great at weeding out!). I do not have a high bar on this test.
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  #55  
Old 12-14-2016, 11:02 AM
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fwiw, when it comes to interviewing, I'm usually the one trying to sell the position to the candidate (but also give them a realistic view of what their job would involve).

That's because I'm not the hiring manager, so I won't be the ultimate decision-maker. I do provide input, but it's not like my input is key on the hiring decision.

However, I can be more influential in selling the position, because many of the people interviewed, whatever position, have more options than what we have.
And at the experienced hire level, you need to be honest - sometimes, the position really isn't a good fit, and the interviewee needs to have the relevant info to figure that out. Neither party wants to waste their time with a bad hire if it's a really bad fit.

I've interviewed with a couple good, solid name companies, and it was clear that while I had the requisite skill set on paper for what they wanted, the role they were looking to fill included many things I really do not enjoy doing, and I would have hated the job had I taken it.
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  #56  
Old 12-14-2016, 11:47 AM
Captain Oveur Captain Oveur is offline
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Originally Posted by Lusus Naturae View Post
I'd say the actual questions asked mean less to me than the mentality behind them.

I go into a short 30 minute interview with an EL candidate, and there are two things I absolutely need to be convinced of to give my thumbs up to a potential offer:

1) Is this person going to be engaged? If they have a question, will they try to figure out the answer, or will they sit there twiddling their thumbs until I spoon feed them the answer? I learned 90% of what I know from researching and figuring things out on my own and only asking senior colleagues when I hit a brick wall, and I expect the same level of independence from my junior colleagues. Many of my questions are geared towards figuring this out about the person (give me an example of a situation where you had to learn a new piece of software for a class - how did you go about doing this? is one of my go-tos).

This is also where questions are important - if the questions are completely irrelevant to the conversation we're having, that's a red flag to me.

2) Is this person going to be someone personable that I can work with? I would say less than 15% of candidates I've interviewed with have failed this test (mostly because the person who phone screens before we bring in EL candidates for interviews is great at weeding out!). I do not have a high bar on this test.
I don't think you can really figure out 1) from the interview. Someone can be able to have their gameface on and be fully engaged during an hour-long conversation, but that's much different than a months-long project. You won't really know if they're going to be good until a reasonable amount of time on the job.
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  #57  
Old 12-14-2016, 12:41 PM
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I don't think you can really figure out 1) from the interview. Someone can be able to have their gameface on and be fully engaged during an hour-long conversation, but that's much different than a months-long project. You won't really know if they're going to be good until a reasonable amount of time on the job.
But I can very quickly figure out if they will absolutely NOT be good

I've interviewed a couple EL candidates who I did not like who got hired anyway, and in both occasions they were terrible hires who didn't work out. The candidates that I loved ended up being star employees. Mixed but mostly positive on the candidates who weren't stars or fails.
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  #58  
Old 12-14-2016, 02:01 PM
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Good points above. I think people can absolutely "fake it" for an interview and then be a complete dud on the job. Doesn't matter how good you are at it, still happens sometimes.

Look at a lot of world class organizations, a Blackstone or McKinsey or Goldman Sachs - they fire people sometimes. Most common reason is, they did a poor job of hiring the person. But many good interview questions give candidates the opportunity to show that they will not be a good fit; yes, some will "play the game well" and pass the test, but if it's a filter that allows you to catch a lot of duds, then it's a great filter - that doesn't change just because some get past the filter.
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  #59  
Old 12-21-2016, 10:28 AM
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I ran into this amusing article today, and of all of the interviews I've had, I've never been asked
Quote:
“If you were a can of soup, what kind of soup would you be?”
Serious question: if one is asked this, how should one respond to it?
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  #60  
Old 12-21-2016, 10:32 AM
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I ran into this amusing article today, and of all of the interviews I've had, I've never been asked


Serious question: if one is asked this, how should one respond to it?
Respond? Just tell them your favorite soup.
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