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  #461  
Old 08-31-2017, 07:05 AM
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Mary Pat Campbell
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AUSTRALIA
NEW SOUTH WALES
JUDGES

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/push-to-ra...24-gy3frr.html

Quote:
The judicial retirement age would be lifted in NSW from 72 to 75 and pension rules tightened under a plan to keep legal talent on the bench and deliver budget savings to reinvest in the justice system.

NSW Bar Association president Arthur Moses, SC, has written to the Berejiklian government and the Labor opposition urging them to amend existing laws to raise the retirement age.


The association is also pushing for a related, and likely more controversial, change that would lift the age at which judges qualify for a generous pension after at least 10 years' service from 60 to 65.

Mr Moses said there were "compelling reasons" to lift the judicial retirement age to 75, including stemming the loss of experienced judges "who would otherwise have had the capacity to continue to make significant contributions to the development of the law".
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  #462  
Old 09-10-2017, 04:32 PM
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JAPAN

https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Eco...retirement-age

Quote:
Japan eyes raising civil service retirement age
Threshold could move from 60 to 65 to cope with shrinking workforce

TOKYO -- The Japanese government has begun examining lifting the mandatory retirement age for civil servants to 65 as a means of counteracting the nation's shrinking labor pool.

Japanese law generally sets the retirement age for civil servants working for the national government at 60. An extension up to three years can be granted if a departure would cause a significant disruption of functions.

But the Japanese population is rapidly graying, which is severely depleting the population of working-age adults, so the government is exploring ways to shore up the number of civil servants.

A group of top-ranking officials from the Cabinet Bureau of Personnel Affairs, the National Personnel Authority and the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications formed a panel this summer to study the issue. They are discussing raising the retirement age in stages, starting in fiscal 2019.

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  #463  
Old 09-20-2017, 12:51 PM
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Mary Pat Campbell
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POLAND

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-e...-idUSKBN1AN1PV

Quote:
EU expresses worry over Poland reviving different retirement age for men and women

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The EU’s executive arm, the European Commission, is concerned that reintroducing a different retirement age for men and women in Poland could violate the bloc’s equality rules, according to a letter from Brussels to Warsaw seen by Reuters.

Poland’s ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party and President Andrzej Duda - who comes from the same political grouping - campaigned on promises to undo a 2012 reform that had been gradually raising and equalising the retirement age at 67.

The government’s change, largely popular among Poles, will take effect from October, reintroducing a retirement age of 65 for men and 60 for women.

“Equal treatment between women and men is a key pillar on which our Union is based,” top EU officials for justice and gender equality, Vera Jourova, and employment and social affairs, Marianne Thyssen, wrote to Poland’s labour minister, Elzbieta Rafalska.

“The Commission has concerns about the changes in the Polish statutory pension system which might be incompatible with EU law.”

Poland’s Deputy Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki defended the government’s change, saying women should have the right to retire earlier because they have more responsibilities, including raising children.
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  #464  
Old 09-21-2017, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by campbell View Post
that's F'd up. If anything everyone on this board knows they have a sounder actuarial argument if it were the other way around.
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  #465  
Old 09-21-2017, 02:17 PM
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And only women raise children? Double WTF!
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  #466  
Old Yesterday, 01:56 PM
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NEW ZEALAND

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/hawkes-bay...ectid=11922585

Quote:
Nick Stewart: Like Romans, fall on our sword and raise retirement age

The issue of ageing populations and funding retirement schemes is not a modern one - the Romans faced the same political and fiscal problems 2000 years ago.

Take yourself back to March when new Prime Minister Bill English opened the door to raising the retirement age in New Zealand - the new superannuation age would lift to 67 years old from 2037.

The new policy would be phased in over three years, from then. Anyone born before 1974 would not be affected by the change.

To be entitled to New Zealand superannuation, the residency test is doubled. A person must have lived in New Zealand for 20 years, and five of those years must be post 50 years of age.

Taking a leaf from John Key's 2008 playbook, Labour leader Jacinda Arden last week pledged during spirited debate that she would repeal National's two-year age lift in 2037 and resign before raising the retirement age.

Stern words for an ever-growing problem.

The average age of Kiwis has increased by 1.3 years every decade, yet the retirement age has not kept pace.

The retirement age hasn't changed since 2001, when it was raised from 60 to 65 over nine years.

Kiwis are living longer, but the retirement age has not changed. It would have been ideal if this was phased in some time ago.

Australia moved on the issue years ago, with former Labour Prime Minister Kevin Rudd introducing the policy.

It has already come into effect across the ditch. Current Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull intends to lift it to 70 years of age by 2035.

Superannuation at its crux has been a political football since 1898, when means-tested pensions were first established in New Zealand.

At that time, the retirement age was 65 and it was formally known as an old-age pension.

When introduced, life expectancy for a man was about 54 years and, due to the harsh means test, about only a third of those over 65 were eligible.

This is not a modern-day problem and is well documented. This has happened before; other states have been dealing with this for thousands of years.

In Roman times, 2000 years ago, Emperor Augustus introduced the "Aerarium militare" for legionaries, a pension for army veterans.

The problem was, Romans started living for longer and there were fewer wars, so fewer people were killed. The pension for the military was under-funded and Augustus found he kept having to introduce new taxes and levies to pay for it.

Unsurprisingly, this caused huge social unrest and civil war appeared inevitable.

In the end, new foreign conflicts were initiated that resulted in the number of serving centurions decline due to casualties and the pension increased from being awarded to those who had served for 12 years to staggering 25 years, to cope with the demand.


Oooh, I've got a bright new idea....
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