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  #61  
Old 02-09-2015, 04:54 PM
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MEASLES

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/mea...europe-n301726

Quote:
Last year, Europe had 3,840 measles cases. Italy alone had 1,921 cases. And that's an improvement over 2013, when there were more than 10,000 cases across Europe. France has had more than 23,000 cases in the past five years.

In comparison, the United States last year had 644 measles cases in 27 states.That's the most since measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. When you look at that another way, it's about the same rate Britain had in 2014, when 137 cases there equaled a rate of 2.1 cases per million people. But it's much lower than Italy's rate of 32 cases per million or the Czech Republican's rate of 21 per million.

"In Europe, we are looking at the American continent as the example of measles elimination," said Niklas Danielsson, senior expert in the Vaccine Preventable Disease Programme at the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC).

Even with regular outbreaks, the United States and other countries in the Americas have been able to stop outbreaks before they spread out of control — at least ever since the bad epidemic years of 1989-1991, when 55,000 measles cases were reported and 123 children died. Soon after federal health officials recommended in 1989 that kids start getting two vaccines instead of one, measles virtually vanished.


Well that explains the graph.

Now I'm wondering if I ever got two shots.

back to Europe's problem:

Quote:
But there are other factors that explain the larger measles outbreaks in Europe, experts say:

-Roma people across the continent fall through the cracks of government-provided healthcare.
-In Italy, there is a lack of access to vaccines.
-In some of the former eastern bloc countries, there are disorganized health care systems.

"We have countries that, very early on after the introduction of the measles vaccine eliminated measles and maintained measles-free (status) since then," Danielsson said. Three examples: Bulgaria and Portugal had no cases last year; Greece had one.

"Then there are other countries that reduced the transmission of measles but never really eradicated it." They include Poland and the Czech Republic.
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  #62  
Old 02-11-2015, 05:04 PM
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MEASLES

http://www.webmd.com/news/20150203/m...DbFQOdSeEC0%3d

Quote:
“We are starting to see more adults get measles and spread it,” Anne Schuchat, MD, said in a press briefing last week. She's the director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.

In just the first month of this year, 102 cases of measles were reported in 14 states, according to the CDC. That's the greatest number of cases since measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. One outbreak -- the one linked to two Disney parks in California -- is responsible for 92% of cases.

According to new numbers from California, 62% of the 92 cases they’ve seen in that state since December are in adults older than 20.

As a result, the CDC is urging adults to get vaccinated.

“If you’re not sure if you’ve had measles vaccine or not, or if you never had measles, we urge you to contact your doctor or nurse and get vaccinated. There’s no harm in getting another MMR vaccine if you’ve already been vaccinated,” Schuchat said.

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  #63  
Old 02-11-2015, 06:30 PM
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"Adults"?
I take it these are adults who got only one shot and that was not enough for this outbreak.
I had measles as a child. Hopefully that will do.
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  #64  
Old 02-11-2015, 06:49 PM
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So, I'm back to getting a measles shot. I'm pretty sure I only got 1.
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  #65  
Old 02-11-2015, 06:54 PM
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Anyone seen any stats on how many Americans are undervaccinated for Measles?

This could get pretty bad, though we're way down on the flat-end of the exponential curve so far.
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  #66  
Old 02-11-2015, 06:56 PM
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Okay, shots I need to get:

- MMR
- DTAP (or whatever)
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  #67  
Old 02-14-2015, 08:14 PM
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EBOLA

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsod...t-want-to-know

Quote:
Now researchers have confirmed how long those bodies can be contagious. The Ebola virus can survive for up to a week in a dead primate.

"As long as the virus is viable then there shouldn't be any difference between a live body and a dead body," head researcher Vincent Munster, a virus ecologist at the National Institute of Health, tells Goats and Soda. His findings will be published in May in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Ebola isn't the only virus that can linger after death.

"Just because a body dies, it doesn't mean that all cells die simultaneously," says Alan Schmaljohn, a microbiology and immunology professor at the University of Maryland, who is unaffiliated with the study. Viruses continue to reproduce, although the total number of viral cells decreases exponentially as the body decays.

Of all the viruses that stick around, the most persistent is smallpox. "It can last for an exceedingly long time," Schmaljohn says, describing how the virus remains viable in scabs. "That's part of what makes the smallpox vaccine such a good vaccine," he says. Because the virus is so tough to kill, doctors could easily move the vaccine from place to place without refrigeration.

.....
A respiratory illness like influenza also isn't such a concern, because the dead aren't likely to sneeze on you. Still, a living person who touches influenza-infected mucus, even from a dead person, might get sick.

As for Ebola, it can spread through many different channels. So it's really easy to catch from people living and dead. "When somebody succumbs to the Ebola virus, the virus is everywhere [on that person's body]," says Munster. "Anywhere you would take a swab you will find the virus." The decaying body emits fluids — blood, saliva, pus, feces — and all of them could carry the Ebola virus. So if any of those fluids come into contact with an orifice or an open cut on a living person, there's a decent chance that person will get infected. And that's the case for at least one other disease that seems far less exotic: norovirus or stomach flu.

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  #68  
Old 02-19-2015, 07:38 PM
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EBOLA

oh look

maaaaaaybe it can be transmitted via a pathway they said they couldn't

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/t...ew-study-says/

Quote:
A team of prominent researchers suggested Thursday that limited airborne transmission of the Ebola virus is "very likely," a hypothesis that could reignite the debate that started last fall after one of the scientists offered the same opinion.

"It is very likely that at least some degree of Ebola virus transmission currently occurs via infectious aerosols generated from the gastrointestinal tract, the respiratory tract, or medical procedures, although this has been difficult to definitively demonstrate or rule out, since those exposed to infectious aerosols also are most likely to be in close proximity to, and in direct contact with, an infected case," the scientists wrote. Their peer-reviewed analysis was published in mBio, a journal of the American Society of Microbiology.

....
"There was almost a rush to ensure the public that we knew a lot more than we did," Osterholm said in an interview Wednesday night, repeating a theme he has raised many times before. "But we're saying you can’t rule out respiratory transmission."

Osterholm's September opinion piece focused on the possibility that the virus could mutate and eventually become airborne, a theory that other experts widely dismissed as extremely unlikely. In contrast, Thursday's review examines the idea that minuscule droplets of body fluid containing the virus could hang in the air and be inhaled by others, providing an unrecognized, if minor, pathway for the virus.

This time Osterholm was joined by Gary P. Kobinger of Canada's Public Health Agency, Pierre Formenty of the World Health Organization's pandemic response unit and Clarence J. Peters, of the Galveston National Laboratory at the University of Texas Medical Branch, among many others.

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  #69  
Old 02-19-2015, 08:36 PM
Dr T Non-Fan Dr T Non-Fan is offline
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So, misty farts?
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  #70  
Old 02-20-2015, 05:56 PM
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SUPERBUGS

http://www.lifehealthpro.com/2015/02..._LID=164548918

Quote:
Every year at least 23,000 Americans die from bacterial infections that don’t have effective treatments, including two patients killed in a recent outbreak in a Los Angeles hospital that has spurred new attention on the issue.

While public health experts say the risk from infections of drug-resistant “superbugs” has been growing, the pipeline of new antibiotics to treat them hasn’t kept pace. Doctors are forced to rely on decades-old medicines with sometimes heavy side effects to treat everything from urinary tract infections to deadly hospital-acquired bacteria such as carbapenem- resistant Enterobacteriaceae, the pathogen in the Los Angeles cases.
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