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  #41  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Catholibertarian95 View Post
I'm not very picky about georgraphy (maybe a little, within 100 miles of my hometown or so).
You should adjust the radius to within 3,000 miles of your hometown. If you're in the midwest you can narrow it further to about 2,000 miles.
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  #42  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:30 AM
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sounds like you do not understand at all the amount of time and effort you have ahead of you if you stick with this profession

if you think college + work + passing exams is too heavy a workload to manage, then this might not be the profession for you

hate studying? lol

don't want to invest time and effort in things that interest you? grow up

don't want to invest time and effort in things that don't interest you? grow up
It sounds like this might not be the profession for the OP.
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  #43  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Hello, My Baby View Post
Look for jobs in other fields, in addition. Actuarial EL is saturated whereas plenty of other stuff is not, and has more upward mobility due to easier competition.
This is a really good point. It's better to be the best underwriter or the best claims analyst than to be the worst actuary. The top nurse at a hospital makes more than the lowest level attending physician. Etc.

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Originally Posted by Klaymen View Post
You should adjust the radius to within 3,000 miles of your hometown.
Very much agree with this.
Actuarial is a tiny field with few employers. Unless your hometown is New York City, you've got to be willing to branch out. Many towns have 0 - 2 actuarial employers within a 100 mile radius and you simply can't afford to be choosy. If you're not willing to work literally anywhere in the continental United States then it would be better to pick another career. The chances that you'll get lucky with an employer who happens to be within 100 miles of your hometown is extremely low for almost any possible hometown.
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  #44  
Old 03-09-2017, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Quasi View Post
I hope you're joking with "not very picky" and then narrowing things to within 100 miles of a town. That is the definition of very picky. You are not the type of candidate that can be picky at all. Get a job any where you can. Work there a year or two and then be picky on location of job #2.
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  #45  
Old 03-09-2017, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Catholibertarian95 View Post
I guess I can also put myself in the seat of someone who graduated with a degree in math (or anything really), who can't find work, and then decides to start taking exams and become an actuary. They would also lack internship experience, as well as having an emplpyment gap. People work their way into the field, so it's possible for me right?
I didn't major in actuarial science or start in actuarial out of college so perhaps my example will help give you ideas. Where you say "lack internship experience", perhaps specific actuarial experience, but you don't need to be cookie cutter (and you aren't).

I graduated with a weak GPA (2.8) in Econ+Math from a state school. I didn't know what actuarial science was nor did I know I'd be interested in it, I just knew I wanted to do data analysis. I struggled to find a job, though I did have an internship and also worked during college, but I job searched 9-5 everyday (was living at home and my Dad even had me "clock in" and "clock out" on a shared google calendar). After two months post-graduation I landed a job a state over doing data analysis. Worked really hard there to get to do work I enjoyed and about 18 months in discovered actuarial. I found an old connection of my Dad's who worked with an actuary who agreed to have coffee with me so I could get a sense of what the work was like and I was set.

Spent the next 12 months working my then current job (which didn't employ any actuaries) studying for the exams by waking up early to study before work and then coming home to study. A year later I'd passed two exams, started looking for a job in EL actuarial and then ended up at an insurance company where I work today (and even got married in the middle of it all).

You don't fit the cookie cutter path and if you're really keen on actuarial it's possible to do it, but you'll have to try and find another job someplace else first to develop a solid trackrecord and a chance to pass exams, but it'll require doing more work than other people around you on a daily basis. My days working and studying (in secret from my boss) for P and FM were some of the longest days I've ever done.

Edit: In fact funny story. Shortly before I left my first job out of college I was helping to interview guys we planned to hire to add to the team. One of them had actuarial science as his major on his resume but no exams passed. My boss and more senior coworker thought his resume looked great but I was cynical because I knew that actuarial science as a major is basically a study program from my experiences researching the field. When I interviewed him I asked him if he'd passed any exams and he said no, that's why he wasn't trying to work in actuarial. I was downbeat on him because of this though my boss/coworker offered him the job. He ended up taking another job elsewhere in the end though.

Last edited by NormalDan; 03-09-2017 at 11:18 AM..
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  #46  
Old 03-09-2017, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Quasi View Post
I hope you're joking with "not very picky" and then narrowing things to within 100 miles of a town. That is the definition of very picky. You are not the type of candidate that can be picky at all. Get a job any where you can. Work there a year or two and then be picky on location of job #2.
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  #47  
Old 03-09-2017, 11:33 AM
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OP, you should check out this thread http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...d.php?t=320077

You seem really clueless about what it takes to be an actuary. And expectations are going to be higher (exams, experience/internships) if your degree is ActSci. So I honestly think your chances of breaking into actuarial work are very small. So maybe you should consider something else - that doesn't require a lot of studying, which you say you hate.
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  #48  
Old 03-09-2017, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Catholibertarian95 View Post
full-time classes + part-time work + extra-curriculars > 40 hours/week
If you believe this is true, wait until you work 40 hours/week while studying for exams. This job is tough. Full-time classes + part-time work + extracurriculars is a breeze compared to being an actuary with adult responsibilities. Is it even considered full-time classes if you cannot manage to get a decent GPA? I would drop some of your extracurriculars if you are struggling passing exams and in your classes. I know people who have had full-time classes/part/full-time work/extracurriculars all while passing actuary exams in addition to having 3.5+ GPAs. I honestly believe that this career choice is not worth the time for you. You would have to commit the next 2+ years of hard work in grooming your resume just to break into the entry level market. Your previous track record shows that you probably do not have the work ethic required to achieve this.

Where are all of the supporters from that other thread that said we should discourage some people from moving on with this occupation? Sometimes it is a lost cause. We should shoot the horse with the broken leg.
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  #49  
Old 03-09-2017, 11:37 AM
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Agree with "clueless". 100 miles is very restrictive. If you don't know this, you have not done an incredibly basic level of research on the profession and how it works. Spend a couple hours on here reading some of the threads just for general info. Learn about this profession that you think you're interested in because you don't seem to have any idea what it is.
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  #50  
Old 03-09-2017, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by ToBeAnActuaryOrNotToBe View Post
If you believe this is true, wait until you work 40 hours/week while studying for exams. This job is tough. Full-time classes + part-time work + extracurriculars is a breeze compared to being an actuary with adult responsibilities. Is it even considered full-time classes if you cannot manage to get a decent GPA? I would drop some of your extracurriculars if you are struggling passing exams and in your classes. I know people who have had full-time classes/part/full-time work/extracurriculars all while passing actuary exams in addition to having 3.5+ GPAs. I honestly believe that this career choice is not worth the time for you. You would have to commit the next 2+ years of hard work in grooming your resume just to break into the entry level market. Your previous track record shows that you probably do not have the work ethic required to achieve this.

Where are all of the supporters from that other thread that said we should discourage some people from moving on with this occupation? Sometimes it is a lost cause. We should shoot the horse with the broken leg.
:bang:

I think the OP really has to decide if it's worth it to him. I was lazy in college and had horrible work ethic but I think I've been relatively slow to mature compared to my age group. By the time I'd worked a year in a real job I was able to motivate myself to put in long days to recover. OP has to figure out if he wants to do the recovery or find an easier (and completely legitimate) path.
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