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  #51  
Old 07-06-2018, 04:59 PM
MathStatFin MathStatFin is offline
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Originally Posted by Pension.Mathematics View Post
do you even realize the amount of work this master plan of yours would require?

1, work full time (during the day)
2, go to school for undergraduate studies and maintain that 3.8 GPA of yours (during evenings)
3, prepare for two actuarial exams
4, prepare for (ivy university) graduate school admission

You need to do all of the above at the same time.

Wouldn't it be better to attempt an actuarial exam (a prelim) first to get a taste of what it's like so that you can maybe eliminate some of your options? and keep in mind that fellowship exams are different from and (arguably) much harder than the prelims, that's why we have career ASAs.
He must have downtime at work to study or else he's potentially setting himself up for failure.
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  #52  
Old 07-06-2018, 05:07 PM
MathStatFin MathStatFin is offline
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Yeah, it's a lot, I'm working my way up to it. At the moment I'm doing 1 and 2, and I'm taking the CPCU at an accelerated rate to help prepare myself for taking the next step towards the actuarial exams. I guess that can be step 2.5. Step 3 and 4 will definitely add a lot, it might be too much for me.

You're right about not knowing until I've taken the actuarial exam, maybe I'll waste some time leading up to the exam and realize that I can't handle all of the above.

Knowing this, I still think laying the groundwork and potentially doing some formal research leading up to the exam is fine, if it turns out grad schools going to be a no go at that point then ok, that's life. But if I wait and get to the exam and turns out, hey, I think grad school is doable, I'll have lost a lot of prep time. Of course, doing exam P sooner would answer that question quicker so I see where you're coming from. I guess I'm just ok with not finding out until later because it makes everything else I'm doing now go smoother. If I get involved in some research, maybe do some volunteer work etc, and it turns out grad schools out of the question once I start the actuarial exam prep, I won't look at it as time wasted. I look at it as taking steps towards a goal that maybe I'll fail to achieve, doesn't mean to not take the steps in the first place.

All of this is assuming I even am going to pursue grad school at all though. The info everyone has given me has been really helpful and I need to think on it some more. I'm also going to review the textbook list in detail at the levels clarinetist recommended to get a better idea of what I'm in for.
Cpcu, actuarial exams, volunteer work, research, grad school, academia, etc. Why are you thinking about all this stuff when you're 30 trying to finish up a bachelors at night?
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  #53  
Old 07-07-2018, 08:26 AM
bsanders33 bsanders33 is offline
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I understand that it's important for many people to establish short-term and long-term goals. But, yah, you need to be realistic and practical or you will simply be wasting a bunch of time building air castles.

My advice: just focus on doing the best you can at your job while maintaining the goal of getting that undergrad. Don't worry about this other stuff. Set up short term goals for classes, courses, grades, and keep plugging away. You are 30 yo with a LOT of hard work in front of you in order to get that Bachelors degree. But getting that done at your age, while working full time, would be a huge achievement and something to be very proud of.

Do that before you even worry about or waste time and mental energy on these bigger dreams
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  #54  
Old 07-07-2018, 12:06 PM
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OP is inspirational IMO
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  #55  
Old 07-07-2018, 12:21 PM
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This is amazing, you've just saved me so much time researching. Thank you so much.
+1
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  #56  
Old 07-07-2018, 02:01 PM
bsanders33 bsanders33 is offline
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Btw you really don't need a fancy reading list to do well on the gre subject test in math. Back in the day, the old SOA 100 was a calculus and LA test. I still have the books I used to study for that. I used the varberg/Purcell calculus book, which is very lean by intro calc standards, even in the newer editions. And for LA they recommended the first six chapters of a wonderful little book called a primer of linear algebra. That stuff isn't hard, but it takes time to learn it well enough to do all the problem sets, as it's about 14 credit hours of stuff. But if you learned it well enough to get an 8 or higher on the old 100 (which required a good grasp of college algebra too) you were well on your way (like maybe 65% there) to getting a decent score on the gre subject test. What you had to add --

A good knowledge of a 2 semester undergrad abstract algebra course. Lots of good texts on this subject. I would recommend any edition (4th is best imo) of durbin's modern algebra

Baby Rudin - just do it. First 7 chapters is fine, maybe a bit of chapter 8. Also read/skim first 15 pages or so of chapter 11, because there are occasional questions on lebesgue integration

Munkres topology, if you have time and you really want a good score. Just first four chapters.

Other stuff - if you've had a course in ODE, diff geo, undergrad geometry, number theory, programming, etc, review it a little before the exam so you can hopefully get a question that may get thrown on this stuff

But really, if you could get an 8 or higher on old soa 100 type exam and if you add the parts of durbin, baby rudin and munkres that I listed, and you study the crap out of it, you'll do great on gre math test
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  #57  
Old 07-09-2018, 08:37 AM
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Thanks everyone for the great feedback. I'll be taking some of the steps recommended, mostly focused on my studies.

I really appreciate all the support I've received over the years here while working towards becoming an actuary, such a great resource. Once I start exam P prep hopefully I can give back a bit by sharing study notes!
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  #58  
Old 07-09-2018, 10:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MathStatFin View Post
Cpcu, actuarial exams, volunteer work, research, grad school, academia, etc. Why are you thinking about all this stuff when you're 30 trying to finish up a bachelors at night?
I don't see what the point of a CPCU is. It's going to have zero implications long-term if indeed this guy's future is so bright that he's gotta wear shades.

I passed the CPCU tests in my spare time for the bonus money. It has zero implication on my career as well, although the collection of letters behind my name looks nice.
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  #59  
Old 07-09-2018, 06:56 PM
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you will simply be wasting a bunch of time building air castles.
Depending on the perspective, everyone builds air castles.

-Riley
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