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  #421  
Old 02-06-2019, 07:39 AM
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During some viral outbreak (swine flu, maybe?), I remember seeing a note on a medical clinic door instructing patients with those symptoms to call upon arrival, then return to their vehicle to wait, and the medical staff would come out to their car to evaluate them. But otherwise I assume the below:
Huh, I was assuming that there would be some sort of test or physical exam required so the telephone / internet stuff wouldn’t work. I guess having them come out to your car could work, but brrrr!
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  #422  
Old 02-07-2019, 04:36 PM
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This is way cool -- something to visualize the evolution of various pathogens

https://nextstrain.org/

Here's zika:
https://nextstrain.org/zika

here's seasonal flu:
https://nextstrain.org/flu/seasonal/h3n2/ha/3y
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  #423  
Old 02-08-2019, 05:27 AM
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https://ktla.com/2019/02/07/downtown...e-all-carpets/

Quote:
Video Shows Rats Inside L.A. City Hall Amid Typhus Outbreak That May Force Removal of the Gov’t Hub’s Carpets

Spoiler:
All carpets at Los Angeles City Hall may need to be replaced amid a Typhus outbreak that may have infected one city employee while at work, according to a motion filed by Council President Herb Wesson on Wednesday.

Wesson first became aware of a vermin issue in November 2018, contacted pest control experts and removed all his office's carpets, according to the motion.

The motion reported cleanup issues and a noticeable increase in rodents in the area, which could have contributed to the outbreak.

On Thursday, Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez provided to KTLA video showing rats running through City Hall offices. Spooked staffers could be heard shrieking in the background.

Los Angeles county health officials first reported a Typhus outbreak in downtown Los Angeles in October 2018, the year there were 142 Typhus cases in Los Angeles County alone, according to a study by the California Department of Public Health.

Typhus is a deadly bacterial disease that is typically transmitted through fleas that have been infected by rodents.

Symptoms include high fever, chills, headaches, muscle aches, rashes, and in some severe cases, internal bleeding. The disease can be treated with antibiotics, according to the California Department of Public Health.

Wesson's motion asks for a report on the scope of vermin and pest control issues at City Hall, and instructs city staff to report back with a cost estimate for removing all carpets in the building and an assessment of all live plants in any city building.

Elizabeth Greenwood, an L.A. city employee, said she started experiencing flu-like symptoms and went to the doctor in November last year.

A blood test revealed she had contracted Typhus.

“I was in shock. Who thinks of Typhus?” Greenwood said. “I thought of Typhus as something I read about in history books."

She said she felt so sick, she thought she was going to die.

“It is terrifying to me that going from my car, up an elevator to my office, I can get this disease from a flea bite,” Greenwood said.

Greenwood said she refuses to return to work until all of City Hall East is fumigated.

Mayor Eric Garcetti's office issued a statement saying that multiple city departments began a coordinated effort to improve cleanliness in Civic Center last fall.

"In addition to increased trash collection and cleanings, aggressive action has been taken to address pests both in the buildings and in the surrounding outside areas," the statement said.

On Thursday, city workers were seen power-washing the sidewalk outside City Hall, cleaning up piles of trash and filling in rat burrows in the surrounding area.

An email was sent out to all city employees telling them not to leave food out in their work area and to take out the trash daily.

“Rats and cockroaches are survivalists and so they are not easy to eliminate,” Wesson told KTLA. “We need to try to stay one step ahead of them, because what we don’t want, is for some of our employees to get sick.”

Typhus is transmitted through the bite of an infected flea and does not travel from person to person, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.


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  #424  
Old 02-09-2019, 06:49 AM
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WASHINGTON STATE
MEASLES

https://www.stripes.com/news/like-a-...AT9nawt5VIahJ8

Quote:
‘Like a wildfire’: Washington state measles outbreak has potential to go very big, very quickly

Spoiler:
VANCOUVER, Wash. — Amber Gorrow is afraid to leave her house with her infant son because she lives at the epicenter of Washington state's biggest measles outbreak in more than two decades. Born eight weeks ago, Leon is too young to get his first measles shot, putting him at risk for the highly contagious respiratory virus, which can be fatal in small children.

Gorrow also lives in a community where she said having an anti-vaccine belief is as acceptable as being vegan or going gluten free. Almost a quarter of kids in Clark County, Washington, a suburb of Portland, Oregon, go to school without measles, mumps and rubella immunizations, and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, recently declared a state of emergency amid concern that things could rapidly spin out of control.

Measles outbreaks have sprung up in nine other states this winter, but officials are particularly alarmed about the one in Clark County because of its potential to go very big very quickly.

The Pacific Northwest is home to some of the nation's most vocal and organized anti-vaccination activists. That movement has helped drive down child immunizations in Washington, as well as in neighboring Oregon and Idaho, to some of the lowest rates in the country, with as many as 10.5 percent of kindergartners statewide in Idaho unvaccinated for measles. That is almost double the median rate nationally.


Amber Gorrow, her daughter Eleanor, 3, and her son Leon, 8 weeks, pick out a show to watch after Eleanor's nap on Feb. 6, 2019. Eleanor received her first measles vaccine, but Leon is still too young to get the shot.
ALISHA JUCEVIC/THE WASHINGTON POST

Libertarian-leaning lawmakers, meanwhile, have bowed to public pressure to relax state laws to exempt virtually any child from state vaccination requirements whose parents object. Three states allow only medical exemptions; most others also permit religious exemptions. And 17, including Washington, Oregon and Idaho, allow what they call "philosophical" exemptions, meaning virtually anyone can opt out of the requirements.

All those elements combine into a dangerous mix, spurring concern about the resurgence of a deadly disease that once sent tens of thousands of Americans to hospitals each year and killed an estimated 400 to 500 people, many of them young children.

"You know what keeps me up at night?" said Clark County Public Health Director Alan Melnick. "Measles is exquisitely contagious. If you have an undervaccinated population, and you introduce a measles case into that population, it will take off like a wildfire."

To date, at least 55 people in Washington and neighboring Oregon have gotten sick with the virus, with new cases tallied almost daily. All but five are in Clark County. King County, which includes Seattle, has one case; Multnomah County in Oregon, which includes Portland, has four, including three cases reported Wednesday. Most of those infected are unvaccinated children under 10, health officials said.

Gorrow, who lives in a middle-class bedroom community, says the outbreak has changed nearly every aspect of her life, which is now laser-focused on avoiding contact with children who may carry measles germs.

When she picks up her 3-year-old from preschool, she gently pushes grubby little hands away from the baby. She canceled a family outing to a children's museum, regular trips to the library, the weekly Costco run and play dates for her daughter.

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"I hate to say it, but I'm even nervous about having people over — especially people who have small children and I'm not sure where they stand" on vaccinations, said Gorrow, 29, who had her older child vaccinated.

Measles, which remains endemic in many parts of the world, generally returns to the United States when infected travelers bring the disease back to pockets of the country where some parents have chosen not to vaccinate their children. When immunization rates fall below a certain threshold, outbreaks can occur; pregnant women, young children and people with compromised immune systems who can't get vaccinated are especially at risk. Last year, 349 cases were confirmed across 26 states and the District of Columbia, the second highest total since the disease was declared eliminated from the United States in 2000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Since October, an outbreak in New York's Orthodox Jewish community has sickened 209 people. In the first month of 2019, 10 states, including New York and Washington, have reported cases, all signs of a resurgence of a disease that is entirely preventable with a vaccine that authorities say is safe and effective.

In Washington, with late winter and spring generally the height of measles transmission, health officials say they are scrambling to stop the disease before it can spread further — spending about $200,000 so far to track down hundreds of unvaccinated people who may have been exposed.

Clark County officials have directed hundreds of families who may have been exposed to the virus at more than three dozen locations — including a Portland Trailblazers basketball game, schools, churches and stores such as Costco and Walmart — to keep their kids home from school for 21 days to avoid exposing others.

They're encouraging parents to vaccinate their kids if they haven't already, and are pushing back against rumors and misinformation, including that self-medicating with vitamin A will prevent measles.

Melnick said the county is also spending precious time and resources addressing false ideas being spread by anti-vaccine advocates, who he said posted "ridiculous" misinformation as comments on the county health department's Facebook page.

Critics claimed, for instance, that the measles vaccine can cause encephalitis, or brain inflammation, he said. That was documented once in a child who had an immune deficiency and should not have gotten a shot. More commonly, encephalitis is a severe but rare complication of the disease itself.

The department has a three-person team countering those assertions and responding to questions.

"That's what we're up against," he said.

Anti-vaccination activists say state officials are twisting facts to stoke public fear.

"It shouldn't be called an outbreak," Seattle-area mother Bernadette Pajer, a co-founder of the state's main anti-vaccine group, Informed Choice Washington, said of the measles cases, arguing that the illness has spread only within a small, self-contained group. "I would refer to it as an in-break, within a community."

Like many in her group, Pajer considers the risks from measles to be less dangerous than those posed by the vaccine itself — a claim that can be traced back to a retracted and discredited 1998 paper that inspired the modern anti-vaccination movement.

In fact, health officials say the virus is so contagious that if an unvaccinated person walks through a room two hours after someone with measles has left, there's a 90 percent chance that an unvaccinated person will get the disease. People can spread measles for four days before the rash appears and for four days after.

Vaccine advocates are also trying to arrange for doctors to meet with parents in small groups or one on one, sometimes for hours at a time, to answer their questions.

Martina Clements, 41, a Portland mom who didn't vaccinate her two children until recently, said the anti-vaccine community uses fear to raise doubts about vaccine safety. But parents who support immunizations can be belittling.

"On one side, they make you afraid, and the other side they make you feel stupid, and you get stuck in this middle where you feel beat up by both sides," she said.

Clements eventually changed her mind, deciding to give her kids the shots after a doctor at a vaccine workshop answered her questions for more than two hours, at one point drawing diagrams on a whiteboard to explain cell interaction. He was thoughtful, factual and also "still very warm," she said.

Vaccine advocates blame federal public health officials for not mounting a more robust response to those spreading fears about vaccine safety.

Peter Hotez, a vaccine scientist and dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, whose daughter has autism, wrote a book, "Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel's Autism," to counter the anti-vaccine lobby.

In a Twitter exchange last week, Hotez said the U.S. surgeon general and CDC director could be doing much more to push states to tighten state vaccination requirements. Surgeon General Jerome Adams responded by flipping the responsibility back to local and state officials, who he says have greater influence with local communities.

"Their response seemed to say this was not their fight because it's a state issue, not a federal one," Hotez said. "But I disagree. I feel that anything adversely affecting the public health of Americans is certainly within" the federal government's purview.

CDC Director Robert Redfield has tweeted about the dangers of the disease and the importance of routine vaccinations. On Sunday, Adams also released a YouTube video with information about measles.

In Washington state, lawmakers supporting tougher vaccine requirements are mounting their second effort in the past three years to make it harder for parents to opt out of vaccinations.

On the same day that Inslee declared a state of emergency, Washington state Rep. Paul Harris, a Republican from Vancouver who represents Clark County, introduced a bill that would prohibit all exemptions from the measles vaccine requirement save for medical and religious reasons.

"It's about public health," he said. "People have told me they won't go to the store or out into the community as much because they have cancer and are getting chemotherapy. So it doesn't just impact those people who choose not to get vaccinated."

Anti-vaccine groups are prepared to turn out at a committee hearing scheduled for Friday. Pajer said her group is arranging experts to testify against it. Among those expected to speak is Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who has argued that there is a government conspiracy about the safety of vaccines.

Despite the expected turnout and the defeat of a similar bill in 2015, Harris said he believes the bill has a chance of passage. The resurgence of a vaccine-preventable disease has scared a lot of people, he said, noting that polls show the vast majority of Americans support vaccinations.

"It's the right thing to do," he said. "This is something we can actually control if we choose to."


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  #425  
Old 02-11-2019, 02:13 PM
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It's just awful. One of my friends there has a 9 month old that needed to go to the ER for a 105 degree fever and he was terrified to take her because he was worried she'd contract measles. Left her in the car with her mother while they waited, but still...

(9 month olds are too young to be vaccinated, I'm told.)
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  #426  
Old 02-11-2019, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by twig93 View Post
It's just awful. One of my friends there has a 9 month old that needed to go to the ER for a 105 degree fever and he was terrified to take her because he was worried she'd contract measles. Left her in the car with her mother while they waited, but still...

(9 month olds are too young to be vaccinated, I'm told.)
Yes, first dose at 12-15 months

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/mmr...-faqs-hcp.html
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  #427  
Old 02-25-2019, 12:48 PM
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SEASONAL FLU

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-n...ead-widely-cdc

Quote:
More Severe Strain of Flu Starting to Spread Widely: CDC

Spoiler:
FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Americans aren't out of the woods yet, as the flu season continues to spread across the country, health officials reported Friday.

One major shift that's occurred is in the viruses that are circulating. At the start of the flu season, the predominant strain was influenza A H1N1, but now a more severe strain, influenza A H3N2, accounts for nearly half of all the new cases, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"It looks like we are moving from an H1 wave to an H3 wave," said Lynnette Brammer, lead of CDC's domestic influenza surveillance team. "There's still a lot of flu to come."

On the plus side, this year's vaccine is more effective than last year's was. According to Brammer, this vaccine is 62 percent effective against H1N1 and 44 percent effective against H3N2.

For children aged 6 months to 17 years, overall vaccine effectiveness is 61 percent, according to the CDC.

Getting kids vaccinated is crucial. This season, flu has already claimed the lives of 41 children.

Behind that statistic lie very real tragedies and heartbreak:

In Lowell, Mass., CBS News reported that 4-year-old Puthiraksmey Paak passed away Feb. 16 due to complications from flu. Her heartbroken father, Sopheak Paak, said his family had recently moved to the United States from Cambodia in search of a better life.
In San Diego, NBC News reported the first child death this season from flu in that city occurred when Julie Leyva Campos, 14, succumbed to the illness Feb. 12. Family members said she hadn't gotten a flu shot and had an unspecified underlying medical condition.
And on Feb. 18, an 8-year-old boy, Martin Ray "Chucky" Campbell Jr., of Rockport, Texas, died only hours after being diagnosed with flu, NBC News reported. "He had a lot to say and now it's just quiet," Campbell's aunt, Jessica Solis, told NBC.

So, Brammer is still urging people who haven't been vaccinated to get their shot. "As long as flu is circulating and you haven't been vaccinated, we recommend that you go ahead and get vaccinated," she said.

In terms of the severity of the season, Brammer said that no flu season is mild. The severity of the season is simply a comparison between seasons. "There are no good flu seasons," she said.

The death toll of flu among adults -- many of them the frail elderly -- is high. So far this year 22,300 adults have died from flu, Brammer said, and more than 250,000 people have been hospitalized.

That's still much lower than last year's death toll, which topped 80,000. But the flu is still around, so more people will be hospitalized and die, Brammer said.

If more people were vaccinated, the number of deaths and hospitalizations could be drastically reduced, she noted.

Brammer stressed that if you get vaccinated but still get the flu, your illness will be milder than if you hadn't gotten the shot. It's also important that anyone who's around babies and older adults get a flu shot.

"Vaccinating the family provides a ring of protection around the baby, or any other family member at high risk for flu," she explained.

The CDC stressed that everyone over 6 months of age should get the flu shot.

Last year, vaccination was estimated to prevent 7.1 million illnesses, 3.7 million medical visits, 109,000 hospitalizations and 8,000 deaths, the CDC reported.

As of Feb. 16, flu is widespread in 48 states, and 30 states are experiencing high levels of the disease. In addition, hospitalizations are increasing, the CDC researchers found.

According to the CDC, flu activity is high in New York City and 30 states including Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

If you get the flu, antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu and Relenza can make your illness less severe. But if you're sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home so you don't infect others.

More information

For more on the flu, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


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Old 02-27-2019, 03:53 PM
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I read the federal government was thankfully going to step in and force mandatory vaccination so that our children aren't exposed to diseases by these anti-vaccine people.
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  #429  
Old 02-27-2019, 05:04 PM
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Please provide a link.
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Old 03-01-2019, 06:54 AM
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CHICAGO
MEASLES

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...228-story.html

Quote:
Travelers passing through Midway Airport last week may have been exposed to measles, health officials say
Spoiler:
Travelers passing through Midway Airport last week may have been exposed to measles, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health.

Most people are vaccinated for the disease in childhood, but those who have not been vaccinated are at higher risk of catching the highly contagious and potentially life-threatening disease.

An Illinois resident who was unvaccinated and infectious arrived in Concourse B of the Chicago airport on Feb. 22, IDPH said in a Thursday news release. People in the airport between 9 p.m. and midnight may have been exposed to the disease, the department said.

Measles is spread through the air when someone coughs or sneezes and can also spread through contact with mucus or saliva from an infected person, according to IDPH.

Two days after the infected person was at Midway, they sought treatment in the emergency department at Northwestern Medicine Delnor Hospital in west suburban Geneva. Those who were in the emergency department on Feb. 24 between 11:45 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. also may have been exposed, according to the news release, as well as individuals who were in the hospital from 4 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. on Feb. 24 and from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Feb. 25.

IDPH and local health departments are investigating the case, according to the news release. No other public locations are known where exposure occurred, and local health departments are working to notify Illinois residents who may have been exposed on the person’s flights, according to the news release.

“Measles is highly contagious,” said IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike in the release. “However, two doses of measles vaccine are about 97 percent effective in preventing measles. We urge everyone to make sure they and their family members are up-to-date on measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine and all other age-appropriate immunizations, especially if you are traveling to other countries where measles is regularly found. Getting vaccinated not only protects you, it protects others around you who are too young to get the vaccine or cannot receive it for medical reasons.”

Those infected by measles may not develop symptoms for weeks. Symptoms like rash, high fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes could develop as late as March 20, according to IDPH. Serious complications like pneumonia and swelling of the brain can follow.

IDPH recommends contacting a health care provider before going in-person to see a health care professional, to make plans for an evaluation that keeps other patients and medical staff from becoming infected.


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