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  #11  
Old 02-14-2017, 02:19 PM
TeacherD TeacherD is offline
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https://www.amazon.com/Excel-2013-Bi...f_rd_i=desktop

What do you think of this book? I messaged one of my old friends in the industry and she uses Excel 2010. I currently have 2007 student version of Excel (wife is schoolteacher) and planned to buy Excel 2013 to start practicing. The interface on the student version of the software is probably different than what folks use on the job and I want to be well prepared.
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Old 02-14-2017, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by TeacherD View Post
https://www.amazon.com/Excel-2013-Bi...f_rd_i=desktop

What do you think of this book? I messaged one of my old friends in the industry and she uses Excel 2010. I currently have 2007 student version of Excel (wife is schoolteacher) and planned to buy Excel 2013 to start practicing. The interface on the student version of the software is probably different than what folks use on the job and I want to be well prepared.
Walkenbach's stuff is good. I don't think that much has changed though
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Old 02-14-2017, 02:22 PM
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Yea, it's not called the Bible for nothing. If you find a 2007 version though I'm sure that's fine as well.
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Old 02-14-2017, 02:49 PM
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You should go to ACTEX and look for "Actuarial Technical Toolbox: Getting the Most Out of Excel" in the Career Building Skills section of their site.

There's about 3 or 4 (pre-recorded) session done by the AO's very own Mary Pat Cambell.

She also has 2 or 3 sessions on VBA as well.
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  #15  
Old 02-26-2017, 10:58 PM
TeacherD TeacherD is offline
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Update: purchased the 2016 version of the book from Amazon. 1000 pages long, and the tech editor is credited with creating some sort of actuarial add-in.

2016 Excel looks pretty similar to 2007. Apparently 2007 was the year MS went to the "ribbon" format of displaying commands.

Given that Excel can now handle over 1M rows of data, I am guessing one does not need to use MS Access very often in the Actuarial field anymore, correct? My recollection is that this was one of the useful tools for datasets too large for Excel in the past (2003 Excel was limited to 65,536 rows).
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Old 02-27-2017, 01:08 AM
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Depends on what you're doing - databases and spreadsheets often have different purposes. If I need to query data, I use Access. It has little to do with how many rows there are (if I had a ton of rows I'd be trying to work in SQL server or something), more to do with what I'm trying to accomplish.

Last job I used Access a lot. My job right now it's mostly Excel but I'm not often needing to query data, and my job is less data intensive in general.

Access is still around, but it varies by company. A personal lines company with really large data sets is unlikely to be using Access much. A specialty line of business where there isn't much data anyway? Less likely to have invested into switching to other technology if they only need to run a query now and then on a smaller data set. Also some companies are slow to change legacy processes, for a multitude of reasons, so you could still see Access even when something else (SQL) would be better.

Just because Excel can handle more rows doesn't mean it does so easily - especially if you have a lot of lookups or array formulas that can slow calculation times down - and it doesn't mean Excel is good for trying to query data.
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