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  #71  
Old 02-08-2017, 08:28 PM
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lllj lllj is offline
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With regard to salaries see
http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...37#post8820237

Seems pay kind of sucks at least without much experience
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  #72  
Old 02-08-2017, 08:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thekang View Post
An actuarial degree in the US is still supposed to prepare you for all the preliminary exams (whether it works or not is another matter).
I wouldn't say this is necessarily true. From what I've seen it's very common for actuarial programs to only have required coursework related to maybe three exams (thinking P, FM, MLC). There might be electives for other exams but not required as part of the major/not necessarily the norm to take. Many actuarial programs are only really meant to prep you for two or three exams, along with some general finance/business/math/economics/insurance knowledge. It's very rare that people come out of college having learned most of the material for the preliminary exams already.
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Old 02-12-2017, 01:43 PM
ishamael ishamael is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jominican View Post
You're talking about one out of thousands of university in North America. The whole discussion here is the if you go to a university in NA, you can't waive actuarial exams.

I'm not sure if you're just using your own personal circle of friends to generalize all the actuarial students in the UK, but it is extremely common in the UK to get exemption CT exams. Sure, they might not get exempt from all the CT, but even 3-4 is significant. Like you said, they could apply to get exempt from the SOA exams, which makes it even faster to become credentialed in the UK (whether you want a UK or US credential). Even if you know a bunch of people who weren't in an actuarial program in University, that doesn't mean the option is unavailable to the general public. Having that option alone makes it faster to become credentialed regardless if you take it.
Worth taking a look at the age of the people who are/aren't ActSci grads. When I first started working with a British-centric team, in my company at least, those born in the late 1970s and prior tended to be non-ActSci grads. In fact many were OxBridge math grads (brilliant people who took the exams from scratch and I really learned a lot from them). Those from the late 1980s onwards tended to be ActSci grads with chockloads of exemptions (mainly people with inordinately high opinion of themselves as they were nearly qualified immediately after graduation)
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