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  #11  
Old 02-15-2017, 08:12 AM
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Abelian Grape Abelian Grape is offline
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Originally Posted by lllj View Post
Really, learning VBA at the level employers will expect doesn't take more than a few days. You can do this and also study for an exam, it's very doable.

If you learned the following in VBA you'd be ahead of the game in my opinion
Know how to record a macro and run that macro later
Know how to open the visual basic editor
Know how to write a sub that creates a message box that says hello world
Know how to write a function that takes an input of a number and adds 1 to it
Write a macro that pastes the number 10 into cell B5
Write a macro that loops through 10 cells and pastes numbers in them

No one's going to expect substantially more than that. Bonus points for learning what an event macro is and how to write one (get a macro to trigger when someone changes a cell, for example).

Once you know the above it's easy enough to play around and learn how to do other basic things. Just need to learn the basic loops and syntax for referencing cells.


I don't know why people think picking up tech skills at an EL candidate level or passing another exam must be an XOR.
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  #12  
Old 02-15-2017, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Abelian Grape View Post


I don't know why people think picking up tech skills at an EL candidate level or passing another exam must be an XOR.
Why doesn't the OP focus on (1) applying for jobs; (2) building a network; (3) developing interview skills?
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  #13  
Old 02-15-2017, 08:27 AM
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Abelian Grape Abelian Grape is offline
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Why doesn't the OP focus on (1) applying for jobs; (2) building a network; (3) developing interview skills?
If his goal is to get himself to stand out from the rest of the competition, passing the four prelims that both societies recognize (for now) in less than a year is a great way to show that. My point is, if he can pass P, FM, and C from Nov 2016 to now, he can probably pass MFE and pick up the other skills by July
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  #14  
Old 02-15-2017, 10:46 AM
Fracktuary Fracktuary is offline
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Do the Exam. SQL is super duper easy to learn, and - based on your background - you should have little to no problem learning it.

If you could explain the various types of joins in an interview, i would consider your skill level sufficient for an EL.
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  #15  
Old 02-15-2017, 10:47 AM
Fracktuary Fracktuary is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lllj View Post
Really, learning VBA at the level employers will expect doesn't take more than a few days. You can do this and also study for an exam, it's very doable.

If you learned the following in VBA you'd be ahead of the game in my opinion
Know how to record a macro and run that macro later
Know how to open the visual basic editor
Know how to write a sub that creates a message box that says hello world
Know how to write a function that takes an input of a number and adds 1 to it
Write a macro that pastes the number 10 into cell B5
Write a macro that loops through 10 cells and pastes numbers in them

No one's going to expect substantially more than that. Bonus points for learning what an event macro is and how to write one (get a macro to trigger when someone changes a cell, for example).

Once you know the above it's easy enough to play around and learn how to do other basic things. Just need to learn the basic loops and syntax for referencing cells.

Based on his coursework, all of this is trivial.
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  #16  
Old 02-15-2017, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by baanotdorky View Post
The whole reason I have this question is because I filled out a job application yesterday that had a check box: "I have basic programming skills such as VBA, R or another language." When I failed to check that box I imagined my application going straight to the trash.

.
You should have checked the box yesterday and check it going forward. Based on your OP you have classes that covered C++, R and what ever other languages you listed in college. i.e. you have just as much basic programming knowledge as anyone else coming out of college who has never had a technical job.

Don't sell yourself short. You should also list all those languages you used in school on your resume. When you get to the interview and they ask, just say "I had classes that covered languages X,Y and Z in school. I haven't used them in a while, but I know it won't be hard for me to get up to speed pretty quickly."

No one will think twice, as this is most entry level candidates looking for a job.
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  #17  
Old 02-15-2017, 11:07 AM
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Checkboxes on applications are rubbish. I would stretch the truth an enormous amount (much more than what TrollMaster is suggesting) before I worried about it. It's all pretty meaningless until you sit down in an interview to discuss what you can actually do.
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  #18  
Old 02-15-2017, 01:03 PM
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that's some pretty nice exam progress
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ASM does not have a discussion of stimulation, but considering how boring the manual is, maybe it would be a good idea.
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  #19  
Old 02-15-2017, 01:24 PM
baanotdorky baanotdorky is offline
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Thanks guys! This is super helpful. Going forward I will definitely try not to sell my existing computer skills short. Too late for the application I submitted yesterday, but that just means the next application will be better!

If being able to do the tasks listed by lllj really is viewed as adequate for entry level candidates then maybe I am in better shape than I thought.

It sounds like taking MFE in March just might be beneficial, but definitely wouldn't hurt. Since I already spent the money on it and can "check the box" on programming skills on applications, I'll start studying for MFE tonight.

Worst case: I fail, still have 3 exams and will have plenty of time to focus on applications/networking before the July sitting.

Best case: I pass and stand out a little more when I start seriously applying to jobs in March.

Still working on being more interesting than a potato.
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  #20  
Old 02-15-2017, 01:43 PM
CowboyGuy CowboyGuy is offline
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Learn the language(s). They'll come very handy, both for the interview and the job itself.

They will distinguish you from others.
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