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  #11  
Old 05-03-2016, 02:06 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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A post on career track that I thought was pretty good, including the "OMG you're so dumb that" advice from a friend.:
http://www.actuarialoutpost.com/actu...0&postcount=87
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  #12  
Old 04-05-2017, 05:41 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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From a thread where a person got some advice from HR while interviewing and asked our opinion (the specific question and advice given aren't really the point):
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Originally Posted by Westley View Post
Don't listen to this, nor to any advice at all that comes from HR, ever.

If HR says something that actually seems like it makes sense - and don't assume this will ever happen, but be ready just in case - then feel free to come here like you have or just go to any experienced actuary and ask what they think about HR's advice, then listen to the actuary (even if they agree with HR, still ok to listen to the actuary).

Most likely scenario IMO is that HR is trying to keep costs down (directive from senior management), but they have a pay scale based on exams, so they don't want people with "too many" exams. So, if you don't have any other potential employers, might be worth listening to HR but in general you want to just go work for a better company.
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  #13  
Old 04-12-2017, 12:14 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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(quoted from another thread)
kingofants, I find your posts kinda annoying, mostly because I think you make a lot of posts demonstrating how clueless you are, and rarely seem interested in actually developing an understanding.

I think that reading and understanding this post will be a huge issue for you, like it could be make-or-break for career potential IMO. Please read carefully and think about this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kingofants View Post
But what about the hours taken away from work to study. I don't know how to quantify that. So for example, an employee that works only 7 hours a day instead of 8 due to studying, and times that by a year or two, how much would that be in terms of dollars?
You're trying to figure out how to quantify the value of an actuary's time? Here's a link that makes that question trivially easy. You could have googled "actuarial salary" and found that in less time than it took you to post here and ask questions.
https://www.dwsimpson.com/downloads/...ge-HANDOUT.pdf


Quote:
Originally Posted by kingofants View Post
1. I am preparing my pitch. By the end of April I should have 5 exams passed. By then, I would be competing with candidates with 2-3 exams. So I am just trying to determine how I can convince them to hire me, with 5 exams, as opposed to someone with 2-3 exams. So if I can get a dollar amount that is significant that hiring me would save the company as opposed to hiring the other guy then I'll save some space on the cover letter for it.

2. No, I can't do it. The 1 hour per day for a year or two in productivity, I have no clue on how to put a dollar amount to that.
OK, if this sounds harsh, not intended. Open up the knowledge basket because here it comes:

1 That is not a pitch that's going to get you a job. Or really help with anything, ever. Read a couple good books (and my thread, see sig line), talk to people, use Career Services at your uni, etc, on how to interview.
2 The fact you can't solve this for yourself is probably going to be a problem when you go to get a job. It's DEFINITELY going to be a HUGE problem if you can't solve such trivially easy questions on your own at whatever job you're interviewing for.

People don't hire (or make hardly any decisions ever, really) based on the type of logic you're talking about. They hire based on instincts and emotions, then after making that emotional decision, they use logic to come up with reasons to justify what they want to do. You're trying to help them with the logic, but if you don't get them to make that emotional decision then they don't care about the logic.
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  #14  
Old 04-12-2017, 12:36 PM
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Vorian Atreides Vorian Atreides is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westley View Post
People don't hire (or make hardly any decisions ever, really) based on the type of logic you're talking about. They hire based on instincts and emotions, then after making that emotional decision, they use logic to come up with reasons to justify what they want to do. You're trying to help them with the logic, but if you don't get them to make that emotional decision then they don't care about the logic.


I would also add that "instincts" will also include an internal sense of "logic" that isn't well-articulated (yet) by the decision maker . . .

Or perhaps kingofants *is* helping them by working from the logic-perspective . . . as it will make it far easier for the interviewer to make a definitive decision on his/her application . . .
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  #15  
Old 08-16-2017, 04:56 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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What does it take to get an actuarial job?

This is an old post, which I've updated a bit:


With two exams, you need two or three things from this list to get a job:

a lot of patience
a little bit of luck,
some extra effort,
a willingness to settle for (what you might consider to be) a second-rate job
a truly dazzling personality



With three exams, you will find a job unless you have

bad communication skills
bad personality
geographical constraints
citizenship issues
some other glaring defect

(any one of those could prevent you from getting a job regardless of exams)



So, it's easier with three, but can definitely be done with two.

Last edited by Westley; 08-23-2017 at 12:59 PM..
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  #16  
Old 08-16-2017, 05:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westley View Post
What does it take to get an actuarial job?

This is an old post, which I've updated a bit:


With two exams, you need two or three things from this list to get a job:

a lot of patience
a little bit of luck,
some extra effort,
a willingness to settle for (what you might consider to be) a second-rate job
a truly dazzling personality



With three exams, you will find a job unless you have

bad communication skills
bad personality
geographical constraints
citizenship issues
some other glaring defect

(any one of those could prevent you from getting a job regardless of exams)



So, it's easier with three, but can definitely be done with two.
Just to be clear, this is for the US market. Other markets might have a different threshold between the two lists.
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  #17  
Old 09-12-2017, 01:47 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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This will be a repository of specific interview questions, and people struggling with how to answer them. My general advice is, think through what the honest answer is and give some version of that. Stop over-thinking, and spend a little time thinking about why they're asking but don't focus on "What do they want to hear?".

Why do you want to work here?
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  #18  
Old 12-13-2017, 03:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
Stop assuming what they think. Better yet, just assume you don't know what they think.
Best advice I've seen for some of the Careers denizens.

Westley, I hope you don't mind my addition to your thread.
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This. And everything else JMO wrote.
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I'm disappointed I don't get to do both.
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  #19  
Old 12-13-2017, 04:51 PM
Westley Westley is offline
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Additions always welcome. And that one is very good.

While the post is addressed to one of the worst offenders, the problem is pervasive: You're in actuarial because you're pretty smart* - even the dumb actuaries are probably top quartile of college grads in intelligence, top 10% of the entire population. So, you're used to being in a lot of situations where you know more than most, and you can use your intuition to reach a conclusion, and then you say "I know that _____ is true". This serves you well when you are, for example, trying to figure out a probability problem that you haven't seen before, because your intelligence is geared toward solving that type of problem. This will not serve you well in most business situations, especially interviewing.

People will almost always be more impressed with you for asking an intelligent question and figuring out what's going on than for insisting you already know and don't have to ask any questions.



*for this post, smart = intelligent = IQ; I'm ignoring all the other facets of intelligent, like self-awareness, creativity, and emotional intelligence.
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  #20  
Old 12-13-2017, 07:11 PM
Aspiring Act Aspiring Act is offline
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What do you do if you are smart IQ wise but not smart in those things that help you do well at an interview?
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