Actuarial Outpost
 
Go Back   Actuarial Outpost > Actuarial Discussion Forum > Careers - Employment
FlashChat Actuarial Discussion Preliminary Exams CAS/SOA Exams Cyberchat Around the World Suggestions

DW Simpson Global Actuarial & Analytcs Recruitment
Download our 2017 Actuarial Salary Survey
now with state-by-state salary information!


View Poll Results: Career?
Petroleum Engineer 37 68.52%
Actuary 17 31.48%
Voters: 54. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-02-2012, 03:28 AM
centaurphoenix centaurphoenix is offline
Non-Actuary
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Amérique du Nord
Favorite beer: "Apple Yuce" :D
Posts: 18
Default Petro-Engineer VS Actuary

I'm stuck between these two.

Important things to consider when arguing among yourselves and I:
  • I'm fluent in Spanish, English, Portuguese, and French. I'd be fine with learning more languages/Spanish dialects, if required.
  • I would not mind working in a different country, if needed.
  • I'm a very good student and hard worker, so I know that I have the potentiality to dominate in either career; especially those pesky actuarial "licensing" exams; lol. I saw someone, on this site, call them that. Thought 'twas cute :3
  • I'm interested in having a technocrat-like influence in the corporate-political world by, hopefully, becoming a CEO; so, which career would give me more opportunity to do this?
  • I actually get a kick out of problem solving.
  • Both careers actually, quite, interest me.
  • I have respectable connections with admission counselors at school X and Y, and I found a way to pull strings at school X, to aid in my acceptance. School X is one of the best engineering schools in the country; it also is one of the schools petroleum/oil and gas extraction/mining activities/coal products manufacturing companies (like EVIL BP & EVIL Dutch petro-Companies) first go to, to employ their future petro-engineers. Lastly, school X is ABBET accredited in its Petroleum Engineering program. I must add that all of school X's undergraduates are always employed immediately after graduation, if not already before graduation!

    School Y has key graduate/upper-division undergraduate courses for future actuarial scientists (like Theory of Interest, Stochastic Process, Actuarial Applications, Advanced SAS Programming/Certification Program, Economic Forecasting). And, it has approved VEE courses. In addition, school Y has very low tuition prices, for its in-state students, yet retaining quality academic programs.
  • I'm still "theoretically" in high school, according to my counselours.
  • I wont mind missing the "college life" too much.
  • I do have a descent plethora of interests, but I know that I can just catch up with'em on m'spare time; and "m'spare time" wont be so existent for a decade (or so), if I choose to go into actuarial work, I've noticed, according to the posts on this site. Probably longer if I choose the CAS route, too :b
  • Would going into actuarial work give me more opportunity to travel, like working in petro-engineering would?
  • Which job would you consider to have more job security, if you consider that I'll be fine taking up work anywhere (in the world being) a petro-Engineer, yet only limit myself to doing actuarial work across the Americas? (I <3 the Americas; hence why I learned its elite languages ['though French isn't "too" elite], even though I'm missing Dutch, Danish, and Greenlandic, but that's another story).
  • I'll try to get through exams P and FM in college, to see if it's m'cup'f tea... Actually, is there an age limit on when you can take P? I'd be willing to start getting ready for it, now lol; only, I'd probably sit-in for it in a year and a half or later-ish.
  • Lucrativeness is quite important to me because I'd like to donate A LOT of my future salary to worthy 'causes; and, that'd be done after doing some interesting investing, inside trading, credit default swaps, and futures trading 'f course
  • I'm a moderate environmentalist and human rights advocate, so I know that being a Petro-engineer would give more opportunity in these areas :p
  • And, yes, I know that if choose to go the petro-engineering route I'll only most likely be surrounded by just guys, please don't reiterate that one.
  • I also know that I'll have to stay up to date with the up-to-datetion of technology, if that made any sense, which I've read is quite hard...
  • I also know that both careers are very consuming.
  • And, don't start with the BS line of "we're gonna run out of oil in couple decades" because it's complete crap. Even if we do, we'll probably be extracting from Mars and the Moon by then, or some other planet, I guess...

And, I know that I might have read of as being a bit ambitious, but as my mumzy says when she's drunk: "It don't cost ta dream!"

lol xD
__________________
Quote:
It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all--in which case, you fail by default.
~ J.K. Rowling


Last edited by centaurphoenix; 07-02-2012 at 03:54 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-02-2012, 03:52 AM
Wigmeister General's Avatar
Wigmeister General Wigmeister General is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Beverly Hills off Canon Drive
Favorite beer: Ringnes
Posts: 18,318
Default

tl;dnr

choose petro engineering
__________________
Spoiler:
* * * * * *
"No one remembers 5K and I wrote a nice poem for the occassion. No one remember's 10k. No one will remember 20k either." - Sir Post-A-Lot

"One of the ordinary modes, by which tyrants accomplish their purposes without resistance, is, by disarming the people, and making it an offense to keep arms."
-- Constitutional scholar and Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story, 1840

"The problem with socialism is you eventually run out of other peoples' money." -- Margaret Thatcher

"Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master." -- George Washington

"Caca pasa" - Anonymous
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-02-2012, 07:24 AM
Guest
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I reject the claim that you are fluent in English.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:05 AM
wolferine wolferine is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
College: Michigan
Posts: 4,588
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dismal Science View Post
I reject the claim that you are fluent in English.
He probably speaks better Portuguese than you.

I think you will need petro engineering and an MBA to rule the world as a technocrat.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:05 AM
cyc's Avatar
cyc cyc is offline
Member
CAS
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 363
Default

petro engineering
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:16 AM
Kaner3339
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Being a "very good student and hard worker" is certainly a good start but the best, most objective metric for which you should use to determine your potential actuarial ability would be how quickly you can catch on to math and logical problem solving. When I was in junior high and high school all I did was play video games when I was at home and I payed attention in my classes for my 90's. Was I a hard worker? No. A good student? Of course not. I may not have gone far yet into this profession but what I do know is that there were students in high school who were hard workers and had great marks but wouldn't stand a chance at passing these preliminary exams. These two replies before me gave troll responses because they have seen enough naive high schoolers ready to take on the world crushed by reality.

Your post lacks objective measures of your ability and believing in yourself is definitely a good start but when you say you "get a kick out of problem solving" instead of listing off your accolades including a first place math olympiad medal or something, people will take it to mean, ok so he thinks he likes problem solving.

If you like calculus then go for it man, and hard work can take you anywhere with some talent.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:17 AM
AvidLearner AvidLearner is offline
Member
CAS SOA
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 259
Default

I'm quite perplex on the long-term survival of both of these fields. ANYWAY:

They both, however, have plenty of skills that could be used in other fields. I can see actuarial skills being used very well in a plethora of situations if you throw in a CFA or MBA, Master in financial economics/others.

Just go with what you like, money will follow?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:26 AM
Interrogative Statement Interrogative Statement is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Studying for FAP
Posts: 1,304
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by centaurphoenix View Post
I'm stuck between these two.

Important things to consider when arguing among yourselves and I:
  • I'm fluent in Spanish, English, Portuguese, and French. I'd be fine with learning more languages/Spanish dialects, if required.
  • I would not mind working in a different country, if needed.
  • I'm a very good student and hard worker, so I know that I have the potentiality to dominate in either career; especially those pesky actuarial "licensing" exams; lol. I saw someone, on this site, call them that. Thought 'twas cute :3
  • I'm interested in having a technocrat-like influence in the corporate-political world by, hopefully, becoming a CEO; so, which career would give me more opportunity to do this?
  • I actually get a kick out of problem solving.
  • Both careers actually, quite, interest me.
  • I have respectable connections with admission counselors at school X and Y, and I found a way to pull strings at school X, to aid in my acceptance. School X is one of the best engineering schools in the country; it also is one of the schools petroleum/oil and gas extraction/mining activities/coal products manufacturing companies (like EVIL BP & EVIL Dutch petro-Companies) first go to, to employ their future petro-engineers. Lastly, school X is ABBET accredited in its Petroleum Engineering program. I must add that all of school X's undergraduates are always employed immediately after graduation, if not already before graduation!

    School Y has key graduate/upper-division undergraduate courses for future actuarial scientists (like Theory of Interest, Stochastic Process, Actuarial Applications, Advanced SAS Programming/Certification Program, Economic Forecasting). And, it has approved VEE courses. In addition, school Y has very low tuition prices, for its in-state students, yet retaining quality academic programs.
  • I'm still "theoretically" in high school, according to my counselours.
  • I wont mind missing the "college life" too much.
  • I do have a descent plethora of interests, but I know that I can just catch up with'em on m'spare time; and "m'spare time" wont be so existent for a decade (or so), if I choose to go into actuarial work, I've noticed, according to the posts on this site. Probably longer if I choose the CAS route, too :b
  • Would going into actuarial work give me more opportunity to travel, like working in petro-engineering would?
  • Which job would you consider to have more job security, if you consider that I'll be fine taking up work anywhere (in the world being) a petro-Engineer, yet only limit myself to doing actuarial work across the Americas? (I <3 the Americas; hence why I learned its elite languages ['though French isn't "too" elite], even though I'm missing Dutch, Danish, and Greenlandic, but that's another story).
  • I'll try to get through exams P and FM in college, to see if it's m'cup'f tea... Actually, is there an age limit on when you can take P? I'd be willing to start getting ready for it, now lol; only, I'd probably sit-in for it in a year and a half or later-ish.
  • Lucrativeness is quite important to me because I'd like to donate A LOT of my future salary to worthy 'causes; and, that'd be done after doing some interesting investing, inside trading, credit default swaps, and futures trading 'f course
  • I'm a moderate environmentalist and human rights advocate, so I know that being a Petro-engineer would give more opportunity in these areas :p
  • And, yes, I know that if choose to go the petro-engineering route I'll only most likely be surrounded by just guys, please don't reiterate that one.
  • I also know that I'll have to stay up to date with the up-to-datetion of technology, if that made any sense, which I've read is quite hard...
  • I also know that both careers are very consuming.
  • And, don't start with the BS line of "we're gonna run out of oil in couple decades" because it's complete crap. Even if we do, we'll probably be extracting from Mars and the Moon by then, or some other planet, I guess...

And, I know that I might have read of as being a bit ambitious, but as my mumzy says when she's drunk: "It don't cost ta dream!"

lol xD
tl;dr
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:36 AM
Guest
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wolferine View Post
He probably speaks better Portuguese than you.
What's your point? Did I write my post in a *******ized version of Portuguese and claim fluency?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-02-2012, 08:36 AM
Guest
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Wow - *******ized is censored. GTFO
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
petro-engineering

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
*PLEASE NOTE: Posts are not checked for accuracy, and do not
represent the views of the Actuarial Outpost or its sponsors.
Page generated in 0.55572 seconds with 12 queries