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  #21  
Old 11-12-2002, 07:11 PM
Cynic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roasted Almond
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If after a few exams and you feel like it would take you 10 years to get your FSA, then you definitely need a new career.
I also agree 10 years is NOT that bad travel time, the key is to START EARLY, investing 10 years from 18-28 is better than investing 28-38 and so on.....
Well, I guess you are right, in most cases. I just think that I don't want to spend 10 years for a post-graduate degree. My goal is to stop studying and have a life after I'm 30. So if I don't get my FSA by then, I'll just settle with ASA or go somewhere else.
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  #22  
Old 11-13-2002, 09:07 AM
Agtuary Agtuary is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynic
My goal is to stop studying and have a life after I'm 30.
This has got to be my favorite quote. I don't think having a life and studying for actuarial exams are mutually exclusive. There are a lot of people passing these exams that are not recluses. Maybe the people saying this are defining "life" as the flexibility to do what I want, when I want. Of course, if you have a job or any other responsibility then you must not have a life under this definition.

All it takes is a little planning and a little effort. There are 52 weeks in the year. That's alot of time. Assuming you want to study 400 hrs per sitting, that's less than 8 hours per week. Okay I'll give you "some" time off. If you take 2 weeks vacation and you don't study for 2 weeks after each sitting we are down to 46 weeks, or 23 weeks per sitting. 400/23 =17.39. Let's make that an even 18 hours per week. You can study 2 hours per day during the week (really, it's not that difficult). That leaves just 4 hours per day on the weekend. Even if you sleep 10 hrs both nights on the weekend you still get 10 hrs per day play time. That sounds like a full day to me.

Not enough time? How about your week days? If you work 9 hr days, take an hour for lunch and have a 1 hr commute each way you would only be gone from 7 to 7. Maybe if you actually sleep 10 hrs per night you don't have much time to do anything else, but for those of us who sleep less, there is still plenty of time to take care of the necessary things in life.

If you were paying attention, 400 hours per sitting and a 45 hr work week only come out to 63 hrs per week. That's including your 6 weeks of not studying. I also forgot to mention company paid study time.

There are plenty of professions where 60 hr work weeks are pretty normal, even after 5 or 10 years.

[off rant]
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  #23  
Old 11-13-2002, 11:32 AM
Caramel Caramel is offline
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Originally Posted by Buru Buru
I thought that 10 years to FSA was pretty good. That's one exam every 1-1.5 years. That doesn't seem so bad. Maybe I do need a new career.
Everything is relative here. In the company that I am working, many people only took 4-6 years to complete FSA, they pass every exam on the first tria. Therefore, you don't feel proud to walk around thinking you want to take 10 years to complete all the exam.

However, I have seen people who took more than 10 years to reach their designation and they enjoyed the same respect, and great career as other who can make it faster.

Ultimately, I guess it's up to personal choice on how many years invested in studying is ENOUGH.
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  #24  
Old 11-13-2002, 12:46 PM
jlf jlf is offline
 
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for all the replies. i have a better taste in my mouth now...

just hope i pass!
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  #25  
Old 11-13-2002, 01:52 PM
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GA Peach GA Peach is offline
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jlf-

Here are my words of wisdom:

Typically, people tend to express themselves more when dealing with negatives and things that aren't pleasant. This is why the majority of what you read are all of the nasty things that go on in this field. Just think about it, how much interest would I stir up if I posted a message saying, gee...I passed my exam and I really didn't mind studying. Pretty boring if you ask me. Things that get people fired up are usually something that's *issed them off.

Just my opinion...

I say go for the exams and if you don't want to continue - change routes! Best of luck-
GP
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  #26  
Old 11-13-2002, 07:26 PM
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Avi Avi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roasted Almond
Quote:
If after a few exams and you feel like it would take you 10 years to get your FSA, then you definitely need a new career.
I also agree 10 years is NOT that bad travel time, the key is to START EARLY, investing 10 years from 18-28 is better than investing 28-38 and so on.....
Unless you're like me, who spent 7 years in a different profession first before returning to mathematics and actuarial studies. I started at 28 (last april) and I guess I'm facing about 8-10 years total time to the FCAS, so my goal is to be FCAS before 40

ps, I STILL don't know my kids' names
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