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  #21  
Old 01-26-2018, 12:06 PM
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Carol Marler
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Originally Posted by campbell View Post
It doesn't help that the human is not cooperating:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/mbvd/the-ha...LE0#.qhevv3b4o
Fear of disciplinary action? Fear of legal implications? Fear, remorse and anxiety?
Yes, the person ought to cooperate, but I can understand their reluctance.
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  #22  
Old 01-26-2018, 02:10 PM
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Dozens of death threats? That's ridiculous. (I'm assuming the claim is true.)
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  #23  
Old 01-26-2018, 03:18 PM
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Then may I suggest shapes as well?

Though I don't know offhand what shape incites the greatest amount of urgency. Red octagon, maybe?
Big Red Exclamation point...in bold. !
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  #24  
Old 01-30-2018, 02:34 PM
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http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/01/30...-fcc-says.html

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Hawaii employee who issued false missile alert thought it was real emergency, FCC says
Spoiler:
The Hawaii employee who issued a ballistic missile alert to residents — causing mass panic for nearly 40 minutes earlier this month — intentionally sent the message thinking the island was being attacked, the FCC said Tuesday in a stunning reversal after officials had insisted the alert was the result of a mistaken keystroke.

In a written statement, the employee, who was not identified, said he believed there was a real emergency on Jan. 13 after hearing a recording that stated “THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” But the employee did not hear the first half of the message that stated “EXERCISE, EXERCISE, EXERCISE,” the FCC said in its preliminary report Tuesday. Though the recording also ended with the "EXERCISE" message, the officer did not hear it.

“While other warning officers understand that this is a drill, the warning officer at the alert origination terminal claimed to believe, in a written statement provided to HI-EMA [Emergency Management Agency] that this was a real emergency, not a drill,” the FCC said.

HAWAII'S FALSE MISSILE THREAT: WORKER WHO PUSHED WRONG BUTTON TO BE REASSIGNED

The employee followed emergency protocol and transmitted the “live incoming ballistic missile alert to the State of Hawaii,” selecting “yes” when reaching a page asking: “Are you sure that you want to send this Alert?”

The FCC said the incident was caused by a "miscommunication" during a shift change between the overnight and day crews. Three other officers reported hearing the "exercise" portion of the message.

This smartphone screen capture shows a false incoming ballistic missile emergency alert sent from the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency system on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
The alert was sent to people in Hawaii on Jan. 13 and caused mass panic and fear.

The FCC said Hawaii officials were conducting an “atypical number of no notice drills” that increased the chances of a mistake happening. The organization blamed the state’s flawed system, including how the alert software failed to differentiate between testing and live production environments, for the error. The report added the Hawaii agency wasn’t well equipped to send out a correction and the delay to send one made the mistake even worse.

“I do want to say it is astounding that no one was hurt in this accident," FCC Commissioner Mike O'Reilly said. "This could have been a catastrophe."

HAWAII GOVERNOR TOOK LONG TO POST ON TWITTER ABOUT MISSILE ALERT BECAUSE HE FORGOT USERNAME, PASSWORD

The emergency alert that was sent on Jan. 13 about 8:07 a.m. local time read: “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

By 8:20 a.m., Hawaii EMA tweeted there was “NO missile threat” to the state, but failed to send a follow-up phone alert for another 38 minutes, causing mass panic among people who weren’t able to check social media.


Hawaii EMA

@Hawaii_EMA
NO missile threat to Hawaii.

1:20 PM - Jan 13, 2018 Honolulu, HI
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Vern Miyagi, who oversees the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, said in a news conference the worker who pressed the alert button “feels bad.”

"This guy feels bad, right. He's not doing this on purpose - it was a mistake on his part and he feels terrible about it," Miyagi said.

View image on Twitter
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Anthony Quintano

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Electronic signs displaying this in Honolulu right now

2:50 PM - Jan 13, 2018 Honolulu, HI
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The worker, who still remains unidentified, was temporarily reassigned pending the investigation.

The FCC said Hawaii Emergency Agency has taken steps to update its system and create new policies to prevent another false alert. Agency supervisors will be required to receive prior warnings before a drill. Two officers will also be assigned to transmit and validate every alert and test before it is sent.


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  #25  
Old 01-30-2018, 03:06 PM
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Thanks, campbell.

I can see why this person does not want identifying information revealed. And perhaps why the person did not want to be interviewed. At least not without first talking to a lawyer.

And the part about replying "yes" to the "are you sure?" question actually makes me feel better about the matter.
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Carol Marler, "Just My Opinion"

Pluto is no longer a planet and I am no longer an actuary. Please take my opinions as non-actuarial.


My latest favorite quotes, updated Apr 5, 2018.

Spoiler:
I should keep these four permanently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekrap View Post
JMO is right
Quote:
Originally Posted by campbell View Post
I agree with JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westley View Post
And def agree w/ JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG View Post
This. And everything else JMO wrote.
And this all purpose permanent quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Yup, it is always someone else's fault.
MORE:
All purpose response for careers forum:
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorNo View Post
Depends upon the employer and the situation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sredni Vashtar View Post
I feel like ERM is 90% buzzwords, and that the underlying agenda is to make sure at least one of your Corporate Officers is not dumb.
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  #26  
Old 02-02-2018, 03:59 PM
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https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.49be3cfbfa2e

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The missile employee messed up because Hawaii rewards incompetence

Spoiler:

sorry, on an ipad, will fill in the actual story later
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  #27  
Old 02-02-2018, 05:48 PM
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This week, we learned the man responsible for the bogus Hawaii missile alert kept his job for a decade even though he had a history of performance problems and has been a “source of concern,” according to an Federal Communications Commission report. His co-workers had expressed discomfort about his leadership, and the FCC said he has been “unable to comprehend the situation at hand and has confused real life events and drills on at least two separate occasions.” Although the emergency management supervisor, who remains unnamed, was a union member, he could have been fired at will. Instead, he was promoted to a leadership role. “Why,” Gizmodo understandably wondered, “was the employee in a position to send a false missile alarm to a couple million people?”

As we say in the islands, e komo mai (welcome) to Hawaii.

I worked as a Hawaii state employee for a short time, serving as spokesman for a division of the Hawaii Commerce Department, and then spent more than seven years dealing with the government as a journalist. Anyone who knows how Honolulu functions cannot have been surprised by this week’s revelations. The sad part is the worker’s incompetence and the chaos he caused have exposed to the world ugly, old tropes about Hawaiian accountability and competence about the state residents would love nothing more than to shake off. “How many more noneffective employees are on the job here in Hawaii?” asked a local on Hawaii News Now’s Facebook page.


There is a strong assumption in the islands that once you enter the state government system, you are set for life. There are great retirement benefits, union protections and the ability to move up, and laterally, across departments. (According to figures drawn from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Hawaii has the second-highest rate of union membership — more than 20 percent — after New York.) The prevailing assumption is: You do not have to work that hard.

And there is no cost for messing up. Vern Miyagi, the emergency management chief who resigned in the wake of the FCC report Tuesday, made his reluctance to fire the alert author clear: “You gotta know this guy feels bad right? I mean he’s not doing this on purpose.” I also recall a Honolulu police officer who was fired in 2012 for falsifying reports and lying to investigators, then was hired by the state of Hawaii as a law enforcement officer, only to be convicted last year of raping a teenage girl while in uniform. Even the police chief in Honolulu held onto his job for a year while the feds investigated him for using police resources to frame someone for a personal vendetta.

Hawaii Gov. David Ige (D) said a false wireless emergency alert that a ballistic missile was headed for Hawaii was "unfortunate and regrettable." (Reuters)





Hawaii is a small community with a strong local whisper network (coconut wireless, as it is called), but the community there dislikes shaming. Despite that his salary is paid by tax dollars, and he led hundreds of thousands to believe they would imminently die, the man behind the phone alert still remains unaccountable to the public.


Another problem is state workers who want to buckle down are saddled with obsolete tech. Hawaii Gov. David Ige said after the alert debacle he did not know his own Twitter password (and apparently neither did his communications staff) — a perfect encapsulation of how behind the state’s tech is. It is a government that pays its employees via a financial accounting platform that’s 40 years old strung together with parts bought on eBay.

Hawaii desperately wants to diversify its economy beyond tourism and U.S. military spending. Plantation agriculture kept the state afloat for the past century but is now a dead industry. The state wants to “develop foundations for an innovation economy and nurturing emerging industries,” according to a government strategy plan. It is hard to see how this episode inspires any confidence for investors and start-up wunderkinds.

When I worked at the Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs in 2013, I remember opening a PDF attachment and closing my eyes for a few minutes while my outdated, state-issued computer opened the file only a few megabytes large. It was a great time to rest before spending two hours out to lunch with the rest of your colleagues — a normal occurrence for state employees.


Culturally, Hawaii tends to reward seniority, not competence. Careers often advance only when incumbent workers resign or die. In 2006, when Time magazine called octogenarian Hawaii’s Dan Akaka one of the five worst U.S. senators for sponsoring only minor resolutions and bills that died in committee, former U.S. representative Ed Case decided to challenge him in the Democratic primary. A 2006 Star-Bulletin piece surveyed the widespread reaction to this brazen maneuver. Sample comment: “Wait his turn! Has he no respect for his elders?” Case lost by 10 percentage points.

That is a sentiment young people (and apparently 54-year-old members of Congress) hear often in Hawaii. The writer of that 2006 essay rued how “local values” insist on deference and conformity. “If I were first to speak, I’d be called ‘pushy.’ If my answers were too outrageous, I might be teased,” she wrote. “Best to keep silent.”

I often heard residents of my old state parrot a Japanese saying: The nail that sticks out gets hammered down. People who want reform, or just to try something new, hear a common refrain in Hawaii’s private and public sectors: “That’s not how things have been done before.” Play your role, and you will be rewarded when you are good and old.


That attitude has consequences. This week’s report shows it was no secret the missile alert’s author was inept. Yet he somehow landed the critical job of telling an entire state whether they could die of a nuclear blast. While 10 years passed, his supervisors did nothing to remove him from a job they knew he was unqualified for, nor did they implement any procedures on what to do when someone accidentally sends a missile alert. It took a national embarrassment to dislodge him from his job.

A nuclear reality is a new one for Hawaii residents to face, one they are clearly unprepared for. The way things were done before did not suffice, and it appears nobody who could change it stuck out and risked getting hammered down.

In 2018, speed and accountability are life-or-death matters, and Hawaii is not ready. For 10 years and more, it tolerated incompetence. It cannot afford another 10 years of inaction. This is not a drill.
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  #28  
Old 02-02-2018, 06:00 PM
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Thanks wat -- I just got back on my laptop

I don't think this is a Hawaii thing. I think it's a government employee thing.
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