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  #11  
Old 01-20-2018, 09:11 AM
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Carol Marler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wat? View Post
If we're sending out emergency messages all at once by clicking individual links, it's a problem.

Everyone's talking about a "big red button". Well, if they are indeed emergency situations, then let's go ahead and make them "big red buttons". If it's a test, then make them yellow. If it's a maintenance message/regular update, make it a green button.

Part of operational risk, I think, can be alleviated by understanding the human psyche and constructing your processes around what comes naturally to people. Most adults will get the concept behind a green/yellow/red color schematic.
Just don't forget that some people are color-blind.
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Pluto is no longer a planet and I am no longer an actuary. Please take my opinions as non-actuarial.


My latest favorite quotes, updated Feb 15, 2018. Hmmm. It's been quite a while.

Spoiler:
I should keep these four permanently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekrap View Post
JMO is right
Quote:
Originally Posted by campbell View Post
I agree with JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westley View Post
And def agree w/ JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG View Post
This. And everything else JMO wrote.
And this all purpose permanent quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Yup, it is always someone else's fault.
MORE:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeppermintPatty View Post
But sometimes you get someone who has that charming mix of "don't care" and "don't get it", and there's just not much you can do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bro View Post
I recommend you get perspective.
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Originally Posted by Enough Exams Already View Post
Dude, you can't fail a personality test. It just isn't that kind of test.
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  #12  
Old 01-20-2018, 01:33 PM
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Mary Pat Campbell
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https://medium.com/code-for-america/...t-445cb2b7af82

Quote:
What Healthcare.gov has to do with the Hawaii false alarm — and what to do about it
Spoiler:
By now, you’ve heard of the Hawaii False Alarm, and about the blowback and blame as people try to sort out how this could have happened. In government circles, however, there have been empathy and knowing cringes. It is the norm, not the exception, that government systems are confusing and hard to use. Horrible mistakes happen when people use clunky government systems — they just usually don’t make the news.


An actual punch card with a line of COBOL programming on it. By Rainer Gerhards
In fact, the last time a government technology failure was so thoroughly plastered across the news was when healthcare.gov failed to launch. At the time, I was working for the Chief Technology Officer of the United States in the White House. It was a difficult, frustrating time — but the media glare and public outrage opened up an opportunity to make some critical progress on changes that government workers had been asking for, for years, to prevent it from happening again. Government design is news right now, so I thought I’d share some thoughts on what people working on this problem could do next.

“​One privilege the insured and well-off have is to excuse the terrible quality of services the government routinely delivers to the poor. Too often, the press ignores — or simply never knows — the pain and trouble of interfacing with government bureaucracies that the poor struggle with daily.” — Ezra Klein

What do we do now?
1. Usability Test Your Most Important Services.
Usability test your most important services. Test services that residents count on like food benefits applications, but also internal tools that government workers use, like the software that, say, sends out alerts about incoming missiles. This doesn’t have to be an expensive, slow process with consultants. There are excellent materials and support to do lightweight, frequent, in-house testing that can prevent these issues. The goal isn’t just to find the biggest problems with the service — it’s also to get buy-in and focus from your executives.


Last year, Harvard asked me to present on technology to newly elected members of Congress as part of the longstanding bipartisan program they run to prepare them for their new jobs.


Instead of using my ~15 minutes to rant about my pet government tech issues, I showed them this video of Dominic, a Veteran struggling with homelessness, trying to apply for healthcare.*

The video worked. The congresspeople-to-be weren’t just engaged, they were angry. How could it be this bad? More importantly, how can we help? This set up the rest of the conversation — the specific steps we must take to prevent these problems

2. Adopt the Digital Services Playbook
After the Healthcare.gov rescue, we developed a Digital Service Playbook which hopefully, if followed, would prevent such a disaster again. Every recommendation is written in plain English, and comes with a checklist to help follow along. It was released by the White House and anyone can use it as a hit list of the important issues to cover.

3. Get Help
Great! So now you’ve done usability testing and found the biggest issues and gotten buy-in from leadership that change is needed, you’ve gone through the Digital Service Playbook and know what you’re missing… But how do you actually get it done?

Hire people
Working to keep the people of Hawaii (or Ohioans or Tuscaloosans) safe is some brilliant designer’s dream job. If you need help finding that designer (or engineer or Chief Technology Officer), post your job for free on the Code for America Public Interest Technology job board. (Note to brilliant designers — this is where you can get your dream job)

Get training
If you’re already in government and want to learn skills to help address issues like this, come to the Code for America summit, especially the workshops. Every session — from procurement to hiring — is designed to build exactly the skills we think government leaders need.

Develop relationships with local volunteers


In cities across the country, from Tulsa, OK to Miami, FL, Code for America Brigade volunteers get together with government to help improve services. For example, they’re improving services designed to serve people experiencing homelessness (Asheville, NC) and simplifying benefits applications into SMS-based conversations you can have on a flip phone (Anchorage, AK). Go meet them. There are engineers and designers, but also EMTs and school teachers. They’re ready, today, to help.

Contract help
Government contractors can do incredible work, but the work is typically not set up for success. The key to getting the best out of a contract is to include usability testing and the digital service playbook in the statement of work, but also in breaking down the contract into the smallest pieces possible. 18F is doing groundbreaking work on this front and is happy to help.

Make friends
There are almost 22 million government employees.** They’re all struggling with the exact same things. If you’re a government employee looking for your people, here are some listservs you can join to meet them, team up, and share resources:

Digital Service Listserv
Discussions about developments and best practices in digital services in government.
To join: Email listserv@listserv.gsa.gov with no subject and subscribe digitalservice in the body.

Security Today Listserv
Discussions about developments and best practices in security and privacy, with a focus on technology and the internet.
To join: Email listserv@listserv.gsa.gov with no subject and subscribe security-today in the body.

Devops Today Listserv
Discussions about DevOps practices within government IT organizations, including overcoming the organizational and cultural challenges to effecting change.
To join: Email listserv@listserv.gsa.gov with no subject and subscribe devops-today in the body.

Note: You must have a .gov email address to join these listservs

Digital Service Playbook:
https://playbook.cio.gov/

Quote:
Digital Services Playbook
The American people expect to interact with government through digital channels such as websites, email, and mobile applications. By building digital services that meet their needs, we can make the delivery of our policy and programs more effective.

Today, too many of our digital services projects do not work well, are delivered late, or are over budget. To increase the success rate of these projects, the U.S. Government needs a new approach. We created a playbook of 13 key “plays” drawn from successful practices from the private sector and government that, if followed together, will help government build effective digital services.

Digital Service Plays

1. Understand what people need
2. Address the whole experience, from start to finish
3. Make it simple and intuitive
4. Build the service using agile and iterative practices
5. Structure budgets and contracts to support delivery
6. Assign one leader and hold that person accountable
7. Bring in experienced teams
8. Choose a modern technology stack
9. Deploy in a flexible hosting environment
10. Automate testing and deployments
11. Manage security and privacy through reusable processes
12. Use data to drive decisions
13. Default to open
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  #13  
Old 01-20-2018, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by JMO View Post
Just don't forget that some people are color-blind.
Then may I suggest shapes as well?

Though I don't know offhand what shape incites the greatest amount of urgency. Red octagon, maybe?
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  #14  
Old 01-22-2018, 08:50 PM
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https://mobile.twitter.com/starpolit...er-password%2F

Quote:
Gov. David Ige explains that part of the delay in notifying the public that the Jan. 13 missile alert was a false alarm was because he did not know his Twitter password.
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  #15  
Old 01-23-2018, 11:06 AM
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Carol Marler
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It seems to me that the"real" alert, as opposed to the test version, ought to at least ask one more time "are you sure?"
I had even thought about making a password necessary, but on second thought, if it's a real alert, maybe a delay for password could be a mistake.
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Carol Marler, "Just My Opinion"

Pluto is no longer a planet and I am no longer an actuary. Please take my opinions as non-actuarial.


My latest favorite quotes, updated Feb 15, 2018. Hmmm. It's been quite a while.

Spoiler:
I should keep these four permanently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekrap View Post
JMO is right
Quote:
Originally Posted by campbell View Post
I agree with JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westley View Post
And def agree w/ JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG View Post
This. And everything else JMO wrote.
And this all purpose permanent quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Yup, it is always someone else's fault.
MORE:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeppermintPatty View Post
But sometimes you get someone who has that charming mix of "don't care" and "don't get it", and there's just not much you can do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bro View Post
I recommend you get perspective.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enough Exams Already View Post
Dude, you can't fail a personality test. It just isn't that kind of test.
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  #16  
Old 01-23-2018, 11:45 AM
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SRSLY? A freaking governor doesn't have a communications director/press secretary?
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  #17  
Old 01-23-2018, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by nonlnear View Post
SRSLY? A freaking governor doesn't have a communications director/press secretary?
My understanding was that was the problem. The communications staff run the twitter account, so to post on twitter, the governor had to find someone who had access to his account.
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  #18  
Old 01-23-2018, 04:37 PM
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Mary Pat Campbell
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https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...m_npd_nn_tw_ma

Quote:
Hawaii Gov. David Ige slow to correct false missile alert because he couldn’t log onto Twitter
Spoiler:
In the chaotic minutes after a ballistic missile alert was mistakenly sent out by the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, Gov. David Ige was experiencing a little chaos of his own: He didn't know his Twitter log-in.

While some officials, including Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, raced to Twitter to notify residents that there were not, in fact, any incoming missiles, Ige's Twitter account was dormant for a harrowing 17 minutes — even though he had learned within two minutes that it was a false alarm.

The initial all-caps alert went out at 8:07 a.m. local time on Jan. 13, sending panicked Hawaii residents running for shelter and bracing for catastrophe. "THIS IS NOT A DRILL," warned the ominous message sent to cellphones.

But it wasn't until 8:24 a.m. when Ige tweeted: "There is NO missile threat."

Image: Gov. David Ige speaks at a news conference about the missile alert that rattled Hawaii in the morning hours of Jan. 13, 2018.
Gov. David Ige (left) speaks at a news conference about the missile alert that rattled Hawaii in the morning hours of Jan. 13, 2018. KHNL
On Monday, when asked about the delay, Ige, a Democrat, told reporters he simply couldn't log on to Twitter.

"I have to confess that I don't know my Twitter account log-ons and the passwords, so certainly that's one of the changes that I've made," Ige said after delivering the State of the State address, which made no mention of the missile alert blunder.

An update to his Facebook account came even later: It took Ige another six minutes, until 8:30 a.m., to share on Facebook that the alert was sent in error.

Related: Hawaii missile alert test goes wrong, terrifies the state

He didn't say Monday whether he also was locked out of his Facebook account.

Like many lawmakers, Ige's social media accounts are managed by his communications team. His spokeswoman, Cindy McMillan, told NBC News that the governor had to track her down before he was able to post anything.

"Gov. Ige's Twitter and Facebook accounts have always been updated and managed by staff. Going forward, he will be able to log in on his phone to post in an emergency situation. However, staff will continue to post to and manage both accounts on a day-to-day basis," McMillan said via email.

Hawaii's false missile alert under investigation
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Hawaii's false missile alert under investigation 2:58
Regardless, many residents, cowering in basements or crammed inside bathtubs, were not checking Ige's social accounts as they awaited what they feared would be a deadly missile strike from North Korea. And it wasn't until 38 minutes after the initial alert went out that the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency finally sent out an update: "False Alarm. There is no missile threat or danger to the State of Hawaii."

The incident has prompted a probe by the Federal Communications Commission and a slew of changes to the Emergency Alert System and the Wireless Emergency Alert used by Hawaii's agency, which routinely does internal tests of the system.


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  #19  
Old 01-26-2018, 09:51 AM
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Default I liked the part about human error

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...ng-fcc-n841166

Quoting Lisa Fowlkes, chief of the FCC's Public Safety & Homeland Security Bureau, this part is of interest to anyone dealing with risk management:
Quote:
Fowlkes told the Senate committee that, while the investigation is ongoing, "based on current information it appears that the false alert was a result of two failures: First, simple human error. Second, the state did not have safeguards or process controls in place to prevent the human error from resulting in the transmission of a false alert."
Since humans do make errors, it's necessary to have a plan that prevents the human error from producing a singificantly harmful result.
__________________
Carol Marler, "Just My Opinion"

Pluto is no longer a planet and I am no longer an actuary. Please take my opinions as non-actuarial.


My latest favorite quotes, updated Feb 15, 2018. Hmmm. It's been quite a while.

Spoiler:
I should keep these four permanently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekrap View Post
JMO is right
Quote:
Originally Posted by campbell View Post
I agree with JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westley View Post
And def agree w/ JMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MG View Post
This. And everything else JMO wrote.
And this all purpose permanent quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr T Non-Fan View Post
Yup, it is always someone else's fault.
MORE:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeppermintPatty View Post
But sometimes you get someone who has that charming mix of "don't care" and "don't get it", and there's just not much you can do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bro View Post
I recommend you get perspective.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enough Exams Already View Post
Dude, you can't fail a personality test. It just isn't that kind of test.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 01-26-2018, 10:29 AM
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Mary Pat Campbell
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It doesn't help that the human is not cooperating:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/mbvd/the-ha...LE0#.qhevv3b4o

Quote:
The Hawaii Employee Who Sent The False Missile Alert Is Refusing To Cooperate With The Investigation
An official with the Federal Communications Commission said in a US Senate hearing on Thursday that they were disappointed the employee was refusing to cooperate.
Spoiler:
The employee who sent the false missile alert in Hawaii, causing widespread panic and confusion, is refusing to cooperate with the investigation, a federal official said Thursday.

Lisa Fowlkes, public safety bureau chief for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), told senators in a hearing that she was generally pleased with the cooperation from officials in Hawaii, but that "one key employee, the person who transmitted the false alert, is refusing to cooperate."

"We hope that person will reconsider," she said.

Richard Rapoza, a spokesman for the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, where the employee works, told BuzzFeed News that he wasn't sure why there was a lack of cooperation with the FCC, since he was not privy to their communications.

"With regard to our own investigations, he has taken the position that he provided a written statement shortly after the incident, and doesn't need to speak to investigators because he has nothing to add," Rapoza said.

The alert, which stated "BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL," was pushed to phones on the morning of Jan. 13, sending residents and visitors scrambling to find shelter. They were left shaken and confused when they were notified after 38 minutes that it was a false alarm.

The incorrect alert was sent as part of a drill by the state's Emergency Management Agency, which is responsible for alerts and is a part of the state's Department of Defense.

Last year, Hawaii became the first state to enable push alerts for inbound missile warnings, which are part of preparedness plans made in case of an attack from North Korea.

In the initial aftermath of the alert, Hawaii Gov. David Ige said the alert was sent after an emergency management official accidentally pushed a wrong button.

"It was a procedure that occurs at the change of shift where they go through to make sure that the system is working, and an employee pushed the wrong button," Ige said.

A facsimile of what the operator saw at work was released by Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency, showing that the employee used a button on a drop-down menu with about five options to accidentally send the message. The employee clicked a link titled "PACOM (CDW)," instead of the correct "DRILL-PACOM (DEMO)."

He also had to confirm his choice before sending it, according to agency officials.

While the investigation is underway, the employee has been reassigned within Hawaii's emergency operations center and does not have access to the warning system, Rapoza told BuzzFeed News after the incident.

The employee has received "dozens of death threats," Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Executive Director Toby Clairmont told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser last week. Threats have also been made against the employee's family.

But Clairmont also suggested that the incident could be more than just a case of someone pressing the wrong button, telling the Star-Advertiser that "it's not as easy saying it was one person doing this."

A total of four people were on duty that Saturday morning, he said, and the employee who sent the alert is both a 10-year veteran of the agency and "very well-trained and seasoned."

After the false alert was sent, the agency started requiring that two people sign off on sending the alerts. It also created a correction draft to immediately send to phones if someone sends a false alert again, since one of the reasons cited for taking 38 minutes to send the correction was that there was no prepared message.

In the case of a real missile attack, the US Pacific Command would notify Hawaii officials, who would activate the warning system.

The alert is sent over the Wireless Emergency Alert, a federal system designed to send messages to people based on geographic location. Federal and state agencies can use the system to alert people of weather events and law enforcement notifications.

Sen. Brian Schatz, a Democrat from Hawaii, said during the hearing he is also introducing legislation to make it clear that the authority to send missile alerts is the responsibility of the federal government, which would still work with state and local emergency management agencies.


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