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View Poll Results: Do employers consider job hopping in hiring decisions?
Definitely. 23 32.39%
Somewhat. 25 35.21%
Only a little bit. 9 12.68%
Not at all. 6 8.45%
42 jobs in 84 years 8 11.27%
Voters: 71. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 04-05-2018, 02:40 PM
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kmhst25 kmhst25 is offline
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Default Do employers still care about job hopping?

I recently had a series of interviews for a position, and I was worried about my job history. My resume reads very much like job hopping (new job every ~2 years). I have specific reasons for those transitions, and I made sure to bring them up in the interviews. But, honestly, no one asked and they didn't seem to be critical of my reasons. In fact, when I interviewed with the director, he told me his job history and he sounded like a bit of a job hopper too...

So do employers still care about this? I mean, it's an open secret that moving around is the way to get better salaries and better positions. Have we reached the point where this is a common enough practice that employers don't consider propensity to stay as a big hiring factor anymore?
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Old 04-05-2018, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmhst25 View Post
I recently had a series of interviews for a position, and I was worried about my job history. My resume reads very much like job hopping (new job every ~2 years). I have specific reasons for those transitions, and I made sure to bring them up in the interviews. But, honestly, no one asked and they didn't seem to be critical of my reasons. In fact, when I interviewed with the director, he told me his job history and he sounded like a bit of a job hopper too...

So do employers still care about this? I mean, it's an open secret that moving around is the way to get better salaries and better positions. Have we reached the point where this is a common enough practice that employers don't consider propensity to stay as a big hiring factor anymore?
Why not? most younger generation employees don't have any DB pension like the older ones, loyalty means very little financially if the company doesn't up the pay, then the only way to get a better deal is to change job. Right now the market is good, better do it while it lasts
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Old 04-05-2018, 07:30 PM
extrovertedactuary extrovertedactuary is offline
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When still taking exams, my salary increased by more than 10% per yea, on average. Now that I'm done with exams, my only hope of getting more than a 2% cost of living raise is a promotion. However, it's impossible to get a promotion every year. If I really want big raises now, I'll have to switch.

When discussing whether to offer the job to candidates, we have discussed if we thought the candidate was a flight risk. I always called it a yellow flag and not a red flag. But after raising job hopping history as a concern, the hiring teams I've been on have been pretty lenient.

It seems as though the conclusion was the following: This person may be a job hop risk, but he or she is the best person available for the job at this time, and even if he or she leaves in a year or two, at least we are confident they will have contributed positively to the department during their short tenure.

All else equal, we would prefer someone who does not raise the job hopper yellow flag. However, we have never had all else equal before.
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:03 PM
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We recently hired someone who switched jobs every year. The person assured us that they were looking for something long term. Snake oil. They were gone in a year. I wouldn't do it again. Of course, I can't speak for all hiring managers.
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:14 PM
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I think it depends on where you are in your career. For a young person with too many job hopping, it would matter because for them, a new company has to invest (money and time) to train them and if they leave after a couple of years, their ROI is not good.

On the other hand, in case of experienced people, they start adding value to the company from the beginning and need little time for training. Many of the times companies hire experienced people because the company needs certain skillset and background. These people add a ton of value to the company even if they leave after one year.

I had similar concerns as you until a year ago. I interviewed at 5 different companies and no one even bothered to ask or pay attention towards my job change history. I also had valid reasons handy in case I was asked. I've come to realize that after a certain time, frequent job changes don't matter.
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:31 PM
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The mediocre ones do. The ones that do won't pay you what you want anyway, so don't worry about being rejected by them.
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Don't you even think about sending me your resume. I'll turn it into an origami boulder and return it to you.
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Old 04-05-2018, 08:42 PM
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Depends upon the employer and the situation.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:03 PM
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One time we interviewed a guy with a ridiculous number of jobs. He had like 20 something jobs and his resume was like a little booklet. We passed on him, but I looked him up and it looks like the place that ended up hiring him has had him for 4 years and counting .
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:05 PM
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I'v seen a few managers or senior analysts chirp here and there about job hopping....but from what I've seen.....job hopping doesn't matter if you come across as top tier talent. I can't recall anyone who appeared like an awesome superstar be turned down because he or she was a job hopper.

I think companies are adjusting to the reality is that there is no corporate loyalty (in both directions) so you might as well go for the best option sitting in front of you right then and there.

Some small plan manager in nowhere ville might care...but would you want to work there anyway?

You have to be geographically flexible to use that to your advantage. If you only want to work in one city that can be a problem.

I voted Only a Little Bit in the poll.
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Old 04-05-2018, 10:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmhst25 View Post
I recently had a series of interviews for a position, and I was worried about my job history. My resume reads very much like job hopping (new job every ~2 years). I have specific reasons for those transitions, and I made sure to bring them up in the interviews. But, honestly, no one asked and they didn't seem to be critical of my reasons. In fact, when I interviewed with the director, he told me his job history and he sounded like a bit of a job hopper too...

So do employers still care about this? I mean, it's an open secret that moving around is the way to get better salaries and better positions. Have we reached the point where this is a common enough practice that employers don't consider propensity to stay as a big hiring factor anymore?
From your post history, it doesn't look like you've been an actuary for very long? If by ~2 years, you mean you've had 2 jobs 2 years each, it's not a problem, imo.
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